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11.302J Urban Design Politics (MIT) 11.302J Urban Design Politics (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar about the ways that urban design contributes to the distribution of political power and resources in cities. "Design," in this view, is not some value-neutral aesthetic applied to efforts at urban development but is, instead, an integral part of the motives driving that development. The class investigates the nature of the relations between built form and political purposes through close examination of a wide variety of situations where public and private sector design commissions and planning processes have been clearly motivated by political pressures, as well as situations where the political assumptions have remained more tacit. We will explore cases from both developed and developing countries. This is a seminar about the ways that urban design contributes to the distribution of political power and resources in cities. "Design," in this view, is not some value-neutral aesthetic applied to efforts at urban development but is, instead, an integral part of the motives driving that development. The class investigates the nature of the relations between built form and political purposes through close examination of a wide variety of situations where public and private sector design commissions and planning processes have been clearly motivated by political pressures, as well as situations where the political assumptions have remained more tacit. We will explore cases from both developed and developing countries.

Subjects

urban design | urban design | urban politics | urban politics | design politics | design politics | political extremes | political extremes | urban resilience | urban resilience | public housing | public housing | architecture | architecture | political values | political values | aesthetics | aesthetics | gender politics | gender politics | power | power | capitol design | capitol design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Understanding human pain, suffering and relief through brain imaging

Description

Using examples from her research, Professor Tracey illustrates some of the exciting developments in brain imaging -seeing exactly how the brain is affected by its environment-and discusses how this research impacts on modern medicine, law and society. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

pain | alumni | anaesthetics | brain | suffering | neuroscience | pain | alumni | anaesthetics | brain | suffering | neuroscience

License

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Understanding human pain, suffering and relief through brain imaging

Description

Using examples from her research, Professor Tracey illustrates some of the exciting developments in brain imaging -seeing exactly how the brain is affected by its environment-and discusses how this research impacts on modern medicine, law and society. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

pain | alumni | anaesthetics | brain | suffering | neuroscience | pain | alumni | anaesthetics | brain | suffering | neuroscience

License

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4.322 Introduction to Sculpture (MIT) 4.322 Introduction to Sculpture (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fundamental issues in sculpture such as site, context, process, psychology and aesthetics of the object, and the object's relation to the body. During the semester Introduction to Sculpture will explore issues of interpretation and audience interaction. As a significant component to this class introductions to a variety of materials and techniques both traditional (wood, metal, plaster) as well as non-traditional (fabric, latex, found objects, rubber, etc.) will be emphasized. This class introduces fundamental issues in sculpture such as site, context, process, psychology and aesthetics of the object, and the object's relation to the body. During the semester Introduction to Sculpture will explore issues of interpretation and audience interaction. As a significant component to this class introductions to a variety of materials and techniques both traditional (wood, metal, plaster) as well as non-traditional (fabric, latex, found objects, rubber, etc.) will be emphasized.

Subjects

fundamental sculpture issues | fundamental sculpture issues | site | site | context | context | process | process | psychology and aesthetics of the object | psychology and aesthetics of the object | the object's relation to the body | the object's relation to the body | fabric | fabric | latex | latex | found objects | found objects | rubber | rubber | wood | wood | metal | metal | plaster | plaster

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.380 Music and Technology: Algorithmic and Generative Music (MIT) 21M.380 Music and Technology: Algorithmic and Generative Music (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This course examines the history, techniques, and aesthetics of mechanical and computer-aided approaches to algorithmic music composition and generative music systems. Through creative hands-on projects, readings, listening assignments, and lectures, students will explore a variety of historical and contemporary approaches. Diverse tools and systems will be employed, including applications in Python, MIDI, Csound, SuperCollider, and Pure Data. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This course examines the history, techniques, and aesthetics of mechanical and computer-aided approaches to algorithmic music composition and generative music systems. Through creative hands-on projects, readings, listening assignments, and lectures, students will explore a variety of historical and contemporary approaches. Diverse tools and systems will be employed, including applications in Python, MIDI, Csound, SuperCollider, and Pure Data.

Subjects

Music composition | Music composition | music history | music history | music aesthetics | music aesthetics | algorithmic composition | algorithmic composition | generative music | generative music | computer music | computer music | electronic music | electronic music | contemporary music | contemporary music | music synthesis | music synthesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.304 Writing in Tonal Forms II (MIT) 21M.304 Writing in Tonal Forms II (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course builds on the composition techniques practiced in 21M.303 Writing in Tonal Forms I. Students undertake further written and analytic exercises in tonal music, including a sonata-form movement for string quartet. Students will also have the opportunity to write short works that experiment with the expanded tonal techniques of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Musicianship laboratory is required. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course builds on the composition techniques practiced in 21M.303 Writing in Tonal Forms I. Students undertake further written and analytic exercises in tonal music, including a sonata-form movement for string quartet. Students will also have the opportunity to write short works that experiment with the expanded tonal techniques of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Musicianship laboratory is required.

Subjects

composition | composition | composing | composing | listening | listening | form | form | structure | structure | harmony | harmony | melody | melody | rhythm | rhythm | motif | motif | theme | theme | voicing | voicing | chord | chord | scale | scale | cadence | cadence | tonality | tonality | tonal music | tonal music | atonal music | atonal music | phrasing | phrasing | canon | canon | classical music | classical music | chamber music | chamber music | aesthetics | aesthetics | musical analysis | musical analysis | string quartet | string quartet | prokofiev | prokofiev | sonata form | sonata form | Haydn | Haydn | Mozart | Mozart | Beethoven | Beethoven

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.303 Writing in Tonal Forms I (MIT) 21M.303 Writing in Tonal Forms I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio, AV special element video, AV special element audio. Written and analytic exercises based on 18th- and 19th-century small forms and harmonic practice found in music such as the chorale preludes of Bach; minuets and trios of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven; and the songs and character pieces of Schubert and Schumann. Musicianship laboratory is required. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio, AV special element video, AV special element audio. Written and analytic exercises based on 18th- and 19th-century small forms and harmonic practice found in music such as the chorale preludes of Bach; minuets and trios of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven; and the songs and character pieces of Schubert and Schumann. Musicianship laboratory is required.

Subjects

composition | composition | composing | composing | listening | listening | form | form | structure | structure | harmony | harmony | melody | melody | rhythm | rhythm | motif | motif | theme | theme | voicing | voicing | chord | chord | scale | scale | cadence | cadence | tonality | tonality | tonal music | tonal music | phrasing | phrasing | canon | canon | classical music | classical music | chamber music | chamber music | aesthetics | aesthetics | musical analysis | musical analysis | romantic music | romantic music | romantic poetry | romantic poetry | lieder | lieder | string quartet | string quartet

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.263 The Nature of Creativity (MIT) 24.263 The Nature of Creativity (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is an introduction to problems about creativity as it pervades human experience and behavior. Questions about imagination and innovation are studied in relation to the history of philosophy as well as more recent work in philosophy, affective psychology, cognitive studies, and art theory. Readings and guidance are aligned with the student's focus of interest. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is an introduction to problems about creativity as it pervades human experience and behavior. Questions about imagination and innovation are studied in relation to the history of philosophy as well as more recent work in philosophy, affective psychology, cognitive studies, and art theory. Readings and guidance are aligned with the student's focus of interest.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | creativity | creativity | creation | creation | emotion | emotion | discovery | discovery | invention | invention | experience | experience | evolution | evolution | affective computing | affective computing | meaning | meaning | aesthetics | aesthetics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.302J Urban Design Politics (MIT) 11.302J Urban Design Politics (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar about the ways that urban design contributes to the distribution of political power and resources in cities. "Design," in this view, is not some value-neutral aesthetic applied to efforts at urban development but is, instead, an integral part of the motives driving that development. The class investigates the nature of the relations between built form and political purposes through close examination of a wide variety of situations where public and private sector design commissions and planning processes have been clearly motivated by political pressures, as well as situations where the political assumptions have remained more tacit. We will explore cases from both developed and developing countries. This is a seminar about the ways that urban design contributes to the distribution of political power and resources in cities. "Design," in this view, is not some value-neutral aesthetic applied to efforts at urban development but is, instead, an integral part of the motives driving that development. The class investigates the nature of the relations between built form and political purposes through close examination of a wide variety of situations where public and private sector design commissions and planning processes have been clearly motivated by political pressures, as well as situations where the political assumptions have remained more tacit. We will explore cases from both developed and developing countries.

Subjects

urban design | urban design | urban politics | urban politics | design politics | design politics | political extremes | political extremes | urban resilience | urban resilience | public housing | public housing | architecture | architecture | political values | political values | aesthetics | aesthetics | gender politics | gender politics | power | power | capitol design | capitol design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT)

Description

This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays. This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays.

Subjects

Extensive reading | Extensive reading | major poets | major poets | evolution of each poet's work | evolution of each poet's work | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | recognition of beauty | recognition of beauty | justice | justice | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | British literary authors | British literary authors | 19th century | 19th century | literature | literature | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | Wordsworth | Keats | Wordsworth | Keats | Mary Robinson | Mary Robinson | Mary and Percy Shelley | Mary and Percy Shelley | Thomas De Quincey | Thomas De Quincey | Dickens | Dickens | Walter Pater | Walter Pater | Wilde | Wilde

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.350 Musical Analysis (MIT) 21M.350 Musical Analysis (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to the analysis of tonal music. Students develop analytical techniques based upon concepts learned in 21M.301-21M.302. Students study rhythm and form, harmony, line and motivic relationships at local and large scale levels of musical structure. Three papers (totaling 20 pages, one to be revised) and one oral presentation are required. This class is an introduction to the analysis of tonal music. Students develop analytical techniques based upon concepts learned in 21M.301-21M.302. Students study rhythm and form, harmony, line and motivic relationships at local and large scale levels of musical structure. Three papers (totaling 20 pages, one to be revised) and one oral presentation are required.

Subjects

composition | composition | composing | composing | listening | listening | form | form | structure | structure | harmony | harmony | melody | melody | rhythm | rhythm | musicology | musicology | motive | motive | theme | theme | voicing | voicing | chord | chord | scale | scale | cadence | cadence | tonality | tonality | tonal music | tonal music | phrasing | phrasing | canon | canon | symphony | symphony | sontata | sontata | classical music | classical music | chamber music | chamber music | aesthetics | aesthetics | Schenker | Schenker | Schenkerian analysis | Schenkerian analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.962 Digital Typography (MIT) MAS.962 Digital Typography (MIT)

Description

This class introduces studies in the algorithmic manipulation of type as word, symbol, and form. Problems covered will include semantic filtering, inherently unstable letterforms, and spoken letters. The history and traditions of typography, and their entry into the digital age, will be studied. Weekly assignments using Java® will explore new ways of looking at and manipulating type. This class introduces studies in the algorithmic manipulation of type as word, symbol, and form. Problems covered will include semantic filtering, inherently unstable letterforms, and spoken letters. The history and traditions of typography, and their entry into the digital age, will be studied. Weekly assignments using Java® will explore new ways of looking at and manipulating type.

Subjects

digital typography | digital typography | design | design | type | type | text | text | visual arts | visual arts | computation | computation | digital artworks | digital artworks | java | java | interactive design | interactive design | interactive media | interactive media | aesthetics | aesthetics | signal processing | signal processing | interaction design | interaction design | programming | programming | transformations | transformations | communication | communication | typographic design | typographic design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.961 Numeric Photography (MIT) MAS.961 Numeric Photography (MIT)

Description

The aim of the students from the Numeric Photography class at the MIT Media Laboratory was to present an exhibition of digital artworks which blend photography and computation, in the context of scene capture, image play, and interaction. Equipped with low end digital cameras, students created weekly software projects to explore aesthetic issues in signal processing and interaction design. The results are more than a hundred Java® applets, many of which are interactive, that suggest new avenues for image play on the computer. These weekly exercises led to the final product, an exhibition of the student work. The aim of the students from the Numeric Photography class at the MIT Media Laboratory was to present an exhibition of digital artworks which blend photography and computation, in the context of scene capture, image play, and interaction. Equipped with low end digital cameras, students created weekly software projects to explore aesthetic issues in signal processing and interaction design. The results are more than a hundred Java® applets, many of which are interactive, that suggest new avenues for image play on the computer. These weekly exercises led to the final product, an exhibition of the student work.

Subjects

photography | photography | computation | computation | numeric photography | numeric photography | digital artworks | digital artworks | digital photography | digital photography | java | java | interactive design | interactive design | interactive media | interactive media | aesthetics | aesthetics | signal processing | signal processing | interaction design | interaction design | programming | programming | visual arts | visual arts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.272 Culture Tech (MIT) SP.272 Culture Tech (MIT)

Description

This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw

Subjects

seminar | seminar | samurai | samurai | cooking | cooking | blacksmithing | blacksmithing | Japan | Japan | Peru | Peru | China | China | U.S.A | U.S.A | England | England | longitude | longitude | marine navigation | marine navigation | clocks | clocks | cars | cars | suburbia | suburbia | weaving | weaving | quipus | quipus | encoding | encoding | aesthetics | aesthetics | Zen Buddhism | Zen Buddhism | Inca Empire | Inca Empire | culture | culture | myths | myths | technology | technology | social change | social change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT) STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT)

Description

This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by

Subjects

landscape | landscape | technology | technology | nature | nature | wilderness | wilderness | industry | industry | industrial | industrial | commons | commons | America | America | history | history | agriculture | agriculture | systems | systems | conservation | conservation | preservation | preservation | development | development | environment | environment | native American | native American | railroad | railroad | transportation | transportation | aesthetics | aesthetics | colonial history | colonial history | Dust Bowl | Dust Bowl | National Parks | National Parks | water | water | drought | drought | natural resources | natural resources | food | food | materialism | materialism | capitalism | capitalism | organic food | organic food | photography | photography | film | film

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Does Tragedy Teach?

Description

Third dialogue on the nature of tragedy where they talk about whether tragic theatre teaches people, and if it does, how and what does it teach? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

history of ideas | literature | theory of emotion | theatre | gender | philosophy | Medea | hubris | drama | greek | hamartia | aesthetics | oedipus | shakespeare | #greatwriters | Antigone | history of ideas | literature | theory of emotion | theatre | gender | philosophy | Medea | hubris | drama | greek | hamartia | aesthetics | oedipus | shakespeare | #greatwriters | Antigone

License

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Defining Tragedy

Description

First dialogue between Oliver Taplin and Joshua Billings on tragedy: they discuss what 'tragedy' means, from its origins in Greek culture to philosophical notions of what tragedy and tragic drama are. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | Euripides | theatre | philosophy | Sophocles | drama | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | tragedy | greek literature | aesthetics | Euripides | theatre | philosophy | Sophocles | drama | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | tragedy | greek literature

License

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Understanding human pain, suffering and relief through brain imaging

Description

Using examples from her research, Professor Tracey illustrates some of the exciting developments in brain imaging -seeing exactly how the brain is affected by its environment-and discusses how this research impacts on modern medicine, law and society.

Subjects

pain | alumni | anaesthetics | brain | suffering | neuroscience | pain | alumni | anaesthetics | brain | suffering | neuroscience

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Does Tragedy Teach? (Transcript)

Description

Third dialogue on the nature of tragedy where they talk about whether tragic theatre teaches people, and if it does, how and what does it teach?

Subjects

history of ideas | literature | theory of emotion | theatre | gender | philosophy | Medea | hubris | drama | greek | hamartia | aesthetics | oedipus | shakespeare | #greatwriters | Antigone | history of ideas | literature | theory of emotion | theatre | gender | philosophy | Medea | hubris | drama | greek | hamartia | aesthetics | oedipus | shakespeare | #greatwriters | Antigone

License

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Defining Tragedy (Transcript)

Description

First dialogue between Oliver Taplin and Joshua Billings on tragedy: they discuss what 'tragedy' means, from its origins in Greek culture to philosophical notions of what tragedy and tragic drama are.

Subjects

aesthetics | Euripides | theatre | philosophy | Sophocles | drama | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | tragedy | greek literature | aesthetics | Euripides | theatre | philosophy | Sophocles | drama | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | tragedy | greek literature

License

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s Philosophy of Art

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosop-hy, University of Oxford gives his first lecture in the Aesthetics series on Plato's philosophy of Art. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art | plato | philosophy | aesthetics | art | plato | philosophy | aesthetics

License

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s Poetics

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford gives his second lecture in the Aesthetics series on Aristotle's Poetics. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | philosophy | art | aristotle | aesthetics | philosophy | art | aristotle

License

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3. Hume and the Standard of Taste

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford gives his third lecture in the Aesthetics series on Hume and the Standard of Taste. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | philosophy | art | hume | aesthetics | philosophy | art | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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s Critique of Judgement: Lecture 1

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford gives his fourth lecture in the Aesthetics series on Kant's Critique of Judgement. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement | aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

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s Critique of Judgement: Lecture 2

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford concludes his discussion of Kant's Critique of Judgement in the fifth lecture of the Aesthetics series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement | aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129205/audio.xml

Attribution

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