Searching for algebraic : 51 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2

18.725 Algebraic Geometry (MIT) 18.725 Algebraic Geometry (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field. It also analyzes the relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties. This course covers the fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field. It also analyzes the relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties.

Subjects

algebraic varieties over algebraically closed field | algebraic varieties over algebraically closed field | complex algebraic varieties | complex algebraic varieties | complex analytic varieties | complex analytic varieties | curves and surfaces | curves and surfaces | irreducible components | irreducible components | projective space | projective space | topological diversion | topological diversion | sheaves | sheaves | presheaves | presheaves | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | fibers | fibers | morphisms | morphisms | varieties | varieties | projective varieties | projective varieties | applications | applications | dimension | dimension | krull dimension | krull dimension | completeness | completeness | complex topology | complex topology | Chow's lemma | Chow's lemma | analytic spaces | analytic spaces | curves | curves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT) 18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT)

Description

Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory. Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory.

Subjects

perturbative quantum field theory | perturbative quantum field theory | classical field theory | classical field theory | free quantum theories | free quantum theories | Feynman diagrams | Feynman diagrams | Renormalization theory | Renormalization theory | Local operators | Local operators | Operator product expansion | Operator product expansion | Renormalization group equation | Renormalization group equation | classical | classical | field | field | theory | theory | Feynman | Feynman | diagrams | diagrams | free | free | quantum | quantum | theories | theories | local | local | operators | operators | product | product | expansion | expansion | perturbative | perturbative | renormalization | renormalization | group | group | equations | equations | functional | functional | function | function | intergrals | intergrals | operator | operator | QFT | QFT | string | string | physics | physics | mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | geometric | geometric | algebraic | algebraic | topology | topology | number | number | 0-dimensional | 0-dimensional | 1-dimensional | 1-dimensional | d-dimensional | d-dimensional | supergeometry | supergeometry | supersymmetry | supersymmetry | conformal | conformal | stationary | stationary | phase | phase | formula | formula | calculus | calculus | combinatorics | combinatorics | matrix | matrix | mechanics | mechanics | lagrangians | lagrangians | hamiltons | hamiltons | least | least | action | action | principle | principle | limits | limits | formalism | formalism | Feynman-Kac | Feynman-Kac | current | current | charges | charges | Noether?s | Noether?s | theorem | theorem | path | path | integral | integral | approach | approach | divergences | divergences | functional integrals | functional integrals | fee quantum theories | fee quantum theories | renormalization theory | renormalization theory | local operators | local operators | operator product expansion | operator product expansion | renormalization group equation | renormalization group equation | mathematical language | mathematical language | string theory | string theory | 0-dimensional QFT | 0-dimensional QFT | Stationary Phase Formula | Stationary Phase Formula | Matrix Models | Matrix Models | Large N Limits | Large N Limits | 1-dimensional QFT | 1-dimensional QFT | Classical Mechanics | Classical Mechanics | Least Action Principle | Least Action Principle | Path Integral Approach | Path Integral Approach | Quantum Mechanics | Quantum Mechanics | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Operator Formalism | Operator Formalism | Feynman-Kac Formula | Feynman-Kac Formula | d-dimensional QFT | d-dimensional QFT | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Currents | Currents | Noether?s Theorem | Noether?s Theorem | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Perturbative Expansion | Perturbative Expansion | Renormalization Theory | Renormalization Theory | Conformal Field Theory | Conformal Field Theory | algebraic topology | algebraic topology | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | number theory | number theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.725 Algebraic Geometry (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field. It also analyzes the relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties.

Subjects

algebraic varieties over algebraically closed field | complex algebraic varieties | complex analytic varieties | curves and surfaces | irreducible components | projective space | topological diversion | sheaves | presheaves | algebraic geometry | fibers | morphisms | varieties | projective varieties | applications | dimension | krull dimension | completeness | complex topology | Chow's lemma | analytic spaces | curves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT) 10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

Numerical methods for solving problems arising in heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, chemical reaction engineering, and molecular simulation. Topics: numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations, solution of partial differential equations (e.g. Navier-Stokes), numerical methods in molecular simulation (dynamics, geometry optimization). All methods are presented within the context of chemical engineering problems. Familiarity with structured programming is assumed. The examples will use MATLAB®. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Robert Ashcraft, Sandeep Sharma, David Weingeist, and Nikolay Zaborenko for their work in preparing materials for this course site. Numerical methods for solving problems arising in heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, chemical reaction engineering, and molecular simulation. Topics: numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations, solution of partial differential equations (e.g. Navier-Stokes), numerical methods in molecular simulation (dynamics, geometry optimization). All methods are presented within the context of chemical engineering problems. Familiarity with structured programming is assumed. The examples will use MATLAB®. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Robert Ashcraft, Sandeep Sharma, David Weingeist, and Nikolay Zaborenko for their work in preparing materials for this course site.

Subjects

Matlab | Matlab | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | linear systems | linear systems | scientific computing | scientific computing | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | probability theory | probability theory | use of probability theory in physical modeling | use of probability theory in physical modeling | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | finite difference techniques | finite difference techniques | finite element techniques | finite element techniques | converting partial differential equations | converting partial differential equations | Navier-Stokes equations | Navier-Stokes equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-10.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT) 10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the use of modern computational and mathematical techniques in chemical engineering. Starting from a discussion of linear systems as the basic computational unit in scientific computing, methods for solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, and differential-algebraic (DAE) systems are presented. Probability theory and its use in physical modeling is covered, as is the statistical analysis of data and parameter estimation. The finite difference and finite element techniques are presented for converting the partial differential equations obtained from transport phenomena to DAE systems. The use of these techniques will be demonstrated throughout the course in the MATLAB® computing environment. This course focuses on the use of modern computational and mathematical techniques in chemical engineering. Starting from a discussion of linear systems as the basic computational unit in scientific computing, methods for solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, and differential-algebraic (DAE) systems are presented. Probability theory and its use in physical modeling is covered, as is the statistical analysis of data and parameter estimation. The finite difference and finite element techniques are presented for converting the partial differential equations obtained from transport phenomena to DAE systems. The use of these techniques will be demonstrated throughout the course in the MATLAB® computing environment.

Subjects

Matlab | Matlab | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | linear systems | linear systems | scientific computing | scientific computing | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | probability theory | probability theory | use of probability theory in physical modeling | use of probability theory in physical modeling | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | finite difference techniques | finite difference techniques | finite element techniques | finite element techniques | converting partial differential equations | converting partial differential equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-10.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT)

Description

Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory.

Subjects

perturbative quantum field theory | classical field theory | free quantum theories | Feynman diagrams | Renormalization theory | Local operators | Operator product expansion | Renormalization group equation | classical | field | theory | Feynman | diagrams | free | quantum | theories | local | operators | product | expansion | perturbative | renormalization | group | equations | functional | function | intergrals | operator | QFT | string | physics | mathematics | geometry | geometric | algebraic | topology | number | 0-dimensional | 1-dimensional | d-dimensional | supergeometry | supersymmetry | conformal | stationary | phase | formula | calculus | combinatorics | matrix | mechanics | lagrangians | hamiltons | least | action | principle | limits | formalism | Feynman-Kac | current | charges | Noether?s | theorem | path | integral | approach | divergences | functional integrals | fee quantum theories | renormalization theory | local operators | operator product expansion | renormalization group equation | mathematical language | string theory | 0-dimensional QFT | Stationary Phase Formula | Matrix Models | Large N Limits | 1-dimensional QFT | Classical Mechanics | Least Action Principle | Path Integral Approach | Quantum Mechanics | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Operator Formalism | Feynman-Kac Formula | d-dimensional QFT | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Currents | Noether?s Theorem | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Perturbative Expansion | Renormalization Theory | Conformal Field Theory | algebraic topology | algebraic geometry | number theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.702 Algebra II (MIT) 18.702 Algebra II (MIT)

Description

The course covers group theory and its representations, and focuses on the Sylow theorem, Schur's lemma, and proof of the orthogonality relations. It also analyzes the rings, the factorization processes, and the fields. Topics such as the formal construction of integers and polynomials, homomorphisms and ideals, the Gauss' lemma, quadratic imaginary integers, Gauss primes, and finite and function fields are discussed in detail. The course covers group theory and its representations, and focuses on the Sylow theorem, Schur's lemma, and proof of the orthogonality relations. It also analyzes the rings, the factorization processes, and the fields. Topics such as the formal construction of integers and polynomials, homomorphisms and ideals, the Gauss' lemma, quadratic imaginary integers, Gauss primes, and finite and function fields are discussed in detail.

Subjects

Sylow theorems | Sylow theorems | Group Representations | Group Representations | definitions | definitions | unitary representations | unitary representations | characters | characters | Schur's Lemma | Schur's Lemma | Rings: Basic Definitions | Rings: Basic Definitions | homomorphisms | homomorphisms | fractions | fractions | Factorization | Factorization | unique factorization | unique factorization | Gauss' Lemma | Gauss' Lemma | explicit factorization | explicit factorization | maximal ideals | maximal ideals | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Gauss Primes | Gauss Primes | quadratic integers | quadratic integers | ideal factorization | ideal factorization | ideal classes | ideal classes | Linear Algebra over a Ring | Linear Algebra over a Ring | free modules | free modules | integer matrices | integer matrices | generators and relations | generators and relations | structure of abelian groups | structure of abelian groups | Rings: Abstract Constructions | Rings: Abstract Constructions | relations in a ring | relations in a ring | adjoining elements | adjoining elements | Fields: Field Extensions | Fields: Field Extensions | algebraic elements | algebraic elements | degree of field extension | degree of field extension | ruler and compass | ruler and compass | symbolic adjunction | symbolic adjunction | finite fields | finite fields | Fields: Galois Theory | Fields: Galois Theory | the main theorem | the main theorem | cubic equations | cubic equations | symmetric functions | symmetric functions | primitive elements | primitive elements | quartic equations | quartic equations | quintic equations | quintic equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.702 Algebra II (MIT) 18.702 Algebra II (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate level course follows Algebra I. Topics include group representations, rings, ideals, fields, polynomial rings, modules, factorization, integers in quadratic number fields, field extensions, and Galois theory. This undergraduate level course follows Algebra I. Topics include group representations, rings, ideals, fields, polynomial rings, modules, factorization, integers in quadratic number fields, field extensions, and Galois theory.

Subjects

Sylow theorems | Sylow theorems | Group Representations | Group Representations | definitions | definitions | unitary representations | unitary representations | characters | characters | Schur's Lemma | Schur's Lemma | Rings: Basic Definitions | Rings: Basic Definitions | homomorphisms | homomorphisms | fractions | fractions | Factorization | Factorization | unique factorization | unique factorization | Gauss' Lemma | Gauss' Lemma | explicit factorization | explicit factorization | maximal ideals | maximal ideals | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Gauss Primes | Gauss Primes | quadratic integers | quadratic integers | ideal factorization | ideal factorization | ideal classes | ideal classes | Linear Algebra over a Ring | Linear Algebra over a Ring | free modules | free modules | integer matrices | integer matrices | generators and relations | generators and relations | structure of abelian groups | structure of abelian groups | Rings: Abstract Constructions | Rings: Abstract Constructions | relations in a ring | relations in a ring | adjoining elements | adjoining elements | Fields: Field Extensions | Fields: Field Extensions | algebraic elements | algebraic elements | degree of field extension | degree of field extension | ruler and compass | ruler and compass | symbolic adjunction | symbolic adjunction | finite fields | finite fields | Fields: Galois Theory | Fields: Galois Theory | the main theorem | the main theorem | cubic equations | cubic equations | symmetric functions | symmetric functions | primitive elements | primitive elements | quartic equations | quartic equations | quintic equations | quintic equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.702 Algebra II (MIT) 18.702 Algebra II (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate level course follows Algebra I. Topics include group representations, rings, ideals, fields, polynomial rings, modules, factorization, integers in quadratic number fields, field extensions, and Galois theory. This undergraduate level course follows Algebra I. Topics include group representations, rings, ideals, fields, polynomial rings, modules, factorization, integers in quadratic number fields, field extensions, and Galois theory.

Subjects

Sylow theorems | Sylow theorems | Group Representations | Group Representations | definitions | definitions | unitary representations | unitary representations | characters | characters | Schur's Lemma | Schur's Lemma | Rings: Basic Definitions | Rings: Basic Definitions | homomorphisms | homomorphisms | fractions | fractions | Factorization | Factorization | unique factorization | unique factorization | Gauss' Lemma | Gauss' Lemma | explicit factorization | explicit factorization | maximal ideals | maximal ideals | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Gauss Primes | Gauss Primes | quadratic integers | quadratic integers | ideal factorization | ideal factorization | ideal classes | ideal classes | Linear Algebra over a Ring | Linear Algebra over a Ring | free modules | free modules | integer matrices | integer matrices | generators and relations | generators and relations | structure of abelian groups | structure of abelian groups | Rings: Abstract Constructions | Rings: Abstract Constructions | relations in a ring | relations in a ring | adjoining elements | adjoining elements | Fields: Field Extensions | Fields: Field Extensions | algebraic elements | algebraic elements | degree of field extension | degree of field extension | ruler and compass | ruler and compass | symbolic adjunction | symbolic adjunction | finite fields | finite fields | Fields: Galois Theory | Fields: Galois Theory | the main theorem | the main theorem | cubic equations | cubic equations | symmetric functions | symmetric functions | primitive elements | primitive elements | quartic equations | quartic equations | quintic equations | quintic equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.725 Algebraic Geometry (MIT) 18.725 Algebraic Geometry (MIT)

Description

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence on Algebraic Geometry. The goal of the course is to introduce the basic notions and techniques of modern algebraic geometry. It covers fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field; relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties; and examples with emphasis on algebraic curves and surfaces. This course is an introduction to the language of schemes and properties of morphisms. This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence on Algebraic Geometry. The goal of the course is to introduce the basic notions and techniques of modern algebraic geometry. It covers fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field; relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties; and examples with emphasis on algebraic curves and surfaces. This course is an introduction to the language of schemes and properties of morphisms.

Subjects

algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | Zariski topology | Zariski topology | Product Topology | Product Topology | Affine Varieties | Affine Varieties | Projective Varieties | Projective Varieties | Noether Normalization | Noether Normalization | Affine Morphisms | Affine Morphisms | Finite Morphisms | Finite Morphisms | Sheaves | Sheaves | Bezout’s Theorem | Bezout’s Theorem | Kahler Differentials | Kahler Differentials | Canonical Bundles | Canonical Bundles | Riemann-Hurwitz Formula | Riemann-Hurwitz Formula | Chevalley’s Theorem | Chevalley’s Theorem | Bertini’s Theorem | Bertini’s Theorem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.726 Algebraic Geometry (MIT) 18.726 Algebraic Geometry (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the language of schemes, properties of morphisms, and sheaf cohomology. Together with 18.725 Algebraic Geometry, students gain an understanding of the basic notions and techniques of modern algebraic geometry. This course provides an introduction to the language of schemes, properties of morphisms, and sheaf cohomology. Together with 18.725 Algebraic Geometry, students gain an understanding of the basic notions and techniques of modern algebraic geometry.

Subjects

category theory | category theory | sheaves | sheaves | abelian sheaves | abelian sheaves | shcemes | shcemes | morphisms | morphisms | projective morphisms | projective morphisms | differentials | differentials | divisors | divisors | homological algebra | homological algebra | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | cohomology | cohomology | quasicoherent sheaves | quasicoherent sheaves | projective spaces | projective spaces | hilbert polynomials | hilbert polynomials | gaga | gaga | serre duality | serre duality | cohen-macaulay schemes | cohen-macaulay schemes | riemann-roch | riemann-roch | etale cohomology | etale cohomology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.727 Topics in Algebraic Geometry: Algebraic Surfaces (MIT) 18.727 Topics in Algebraic Geometry: Algebraic Surfaces (MIT)

Description

The main aims of this seminar will be to go over the classification of surfaces (Enriques-Castelnuovo for characteristic zero, Bombieri-Mumford for characteristic p), while working out plenty of examples, and treating their geometry and arithmetic as far as possible. The main aims of this seminar will be to go over the classification of surfaces (Enriques-Castelnuovo for characteristic zero, Bombieri-Mumford for characteristic p), while working out plenty of examples, and treating their geometry and arithmetic as far as possible.

Subjects

near equivalence | near equivalence | algebraic equivalence | algebraic equivalence | numerical equivalence | numerical equivalence | birational | birational | rational | rational | maps | maps | surfaces | surfaces | ruled surfaces | ruled surfaces | rational surfaces | rational surfaces | linear systems | linear systems | castelnuovo's criterion | castelnuovo's criterion | rationality | rationality | picard | picard | albanese | albanese | classification | classification | K3 | K3 | elliptic | elliptic | Kodaira dimension | Kodaira dimension | bielliptic | bielliptic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.704 Seminar in Algebra and Number Theory: Computational Commutative Algebra and Algebraic Geometry (MIT) 18.704 Seminar in Algebra and Number Theory: Computational Commutative Algebra and Algebraic Geometry (MIT)

Description

In this undergraduate level seminar series, topics vary from year to year. Students present and discuss the subject matter, and are provided with instruction and practice in written and oral communication. Some experience with proofs required. The topic for fall 2008: Computational algebra and algebraic geometry. In this undergraduate level seminar series, topics vary from year to year. Students present and discuss the subject matter, and are provided with instruction and practice in written and oral communication. Some experience with proofs required. The topic for fall 2008: Computational algebra and algebraic geometry.

Subjects

Computational algebra | Computational algebra | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | Geometry | Geometry | Algebra | Algebra | Algorithms | Algorithms | Groebner Bases | Groebner Bases | Elimination Theory | Elimination Theory | Algebra-Geometry Dictionary | Algebra-Geometry Dictionary | Polynomial Functions | Polynomial Functions | Rational Functions | Rational Functions | Geometric Theorem Proving | Geometric Theorem Proving | Invariant Theory of Finite Groups | Invariant Theory of Finite Groups | Projective Algebraic Geometry | Projective Algebraic Geometry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.905 Algebraic Topology (MIT) 18.905 Algebraic Topology (MIT)

Description

This course is a first course in algebraic topology. The emphasis is on homology and cohomology theory, including cup products, Kunneth formulas, intersection pairings, and the Lefschetz fixed point theorem. This course is a first course in algebraic topology. The emphasis is on homology and cohomology theory, including cup products, Kunneth formulas, intersection pairings, and the Lefschetz fixed point theorem.

Subjects

algebraic topology | algebraic topology | singular homology | singular homology | singular cohomology | singular cohomology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.786 Topics in Algebraic Number Theory (MIT) 18.786 Topics in Algebraic Number Theory (MIT)

Description

This course is a first course in algebraic number theory. Topics to be covered include number fields, class numbers, Dirichlet's units theorem, cyclotomic fields, local fields, valuations, decomposition and inertia groups, ramification, basic analytic methods, and basic class field theory. An additional theme running throughout the course will be the use of computer algebra to investigate number-theoretic questions; this theme will appear primarily in the problem sets. This course is a first course in algebraic number theory. Topics to be covered include number fields, class numbers, Dirichlet's units theorem, cyclotomic fields, local fields, valuations, decomposition and inertia groups, ramification, basic analytic methods, and basic class field theory. An additional theme running throughout the course will be the use of computer algebra to investigate number-theoretic questions; this theme will appear primarily in the problem sets.

Subjects

algebraic number theory | algebraic number theory | number fields | number fields | class numbers | class numbers | Dirichlet's units theorem | Dirichlet's units theorem | cyclotomic fields | cyclotomic fields | local fields | local fields | valuations | valuations | decomposition and inertia groups | decomposition and inertia groups | ramification | ramification | basic analytic methods | basic analytic methods | basic class field theory | basic class field theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.318 Topics in Algebraic Combinatorics (MIT) 18.318 Topics in Algebraic Combinatorics (MIT)

Description

The course consists of a sampling of topics from algebraic combinatorics. The topics include the matrix-tree theorem and other applications of linear algebra, applications of commutative and exterior algebra to counting faces of simplicial complexes, and applications of algebra to tilings. The course consists of a sampling of topics from algebraic combinatorics. The topics include the matrix-tree theorem and other applications of linear algebra, applications of commutative and exterior algebra to counting faces of simplicial complexes, and applications of algebra to tilings.

Subjects

algebraic combinatorics | algebraic combinatorics | matrix-tree theorem | matrix-tree theorem | linear algebra | linear algebra | commutative algebra | commutative algebra | exterior algebra | exterior algebra | counting faces of simplicial complexes | counting faces of simplicial complexes | tilings | tilings | Young's lattice | Young's lattice | Shannon capacity | Shannon capacity | Fisher inequality | Fisher inequality | Hadamard matrices | Hadamard matrices | f-vectors | f-vectors | Sperner Property | Sperner Property | -Binomial Coeffcients | -Binomial Coeffcients

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.315 Combinatorial Theory: Introduction to Graph Theory, Extremal and Enumerative Combinatorics (MIT) 18.315 Combinatorial Theory: Introduction to Graph Theory, Extremal and Enumerative Combinatorics (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to major topics of modern enumerative and algebraic combinatorics with emphasis on partition identities, young tableaux bijections, spanning trees in graphs, and random generation of combinatorial objects. There is some discussion of various applications and connections to other fields. This course serves as an introduction to major topics of modern enumerative and algebraic combinatorics with emphasis on partition identities, young tableaux bijections, spanning trees in graphs, and random generation of combinatorial objects. There is some discussion of various applications and connections to other fields.

Subjects

enumerative combinatorics | enumerative combinatorics | algebraic combinatorics | algebraic combinatorics | partition identities | partition identities | young tableaux bijections | young tableaux bijections | spanning trees | spanning trees | random generation of combinatorial objects | random generation of combinatorial objects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the use of modern computational and mathematical techniques in chemical engineering. Starting from a discussion of linear systems as the basic computational unit in scientific computing, methods for solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, and differential-algebraic (DAE) systems are presented. Probability theory and its use in physical modeling is covered, as is the statistical analysis of data and parameter estimation. The finite difference and finite element techniques are presented for converting the partial differential equations obtained from transport phenomena to DAE systems. The use of these techniques will be demonstrated throughout the course in the MATLAB® computing environment.

Subjects

Matlab | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | linear systems | scientific computing | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | probability theory | use of probability theory in physical modeling | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | finite difference techniques | finite element techniques | converting partial differential equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT) 10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the use of modern computational and mathematical techniques in chemical engineering. Starting from a discussion of linear systems as the basic computational unit in scientific computing, methods for solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, and differential-algebraic (DAE) systems are presented. Probability theory and its use in physical modeling is covered, as is the statistical analysis of data and parameter estimation. The finite difference and finite element techniques are presented for converting the partial differential equations obtained from transport phenomena to DAE systems. The use of these techniques will be demonstrated throughout the course in the Matlab® computing environment. This course focuses on the use of modern computational and mathematical techniques in chemical engineering. Starting from a discussion of linear systems as the basic computational unit in scientific computing, methods for solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, and differential-algebraic (DAE) systems are presented. Probability theory and its use in physical modeling is covered, as is the statistical analysis of data and parameter estimation. The finite difference and finite element techniques are presented for converting the partial differential equations obtained from transport phenomena to DAE systems. The use of these techniques will be demonstrated throughout the course in the Matlab® computing environment.

Subjects

Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering | Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | nonlinear algebraic equations | nonlinear algebraic equations | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.055J The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering (MIT) 6.055J The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course teaches simple reasoning techniques for complex phenomena: divide and conquer, dimensional analysis, extreme cases, continuity, scaling, successive approximation, balancing, cheap calculus, and symmetry. Applications are drawn from the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Examples include bird and machine flight, neuron biophysics, weather, prime numbers, and animal locomotion. Emphasis is on low-cost experiments to test ideas and on fostering curiosity about phenomena in the world. This course teaches simple reasoning techniques for complex phenomena: divide and conquer, dimensional analysis, extreme cases, continuity, scaling, successive approximation, balancing, cheap calculus, and symmetry. Applications are drawn from the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Examples include bird and machine flight, neuron biophysics, weather, prime numbers, and animal locomotion. Emphasis is on low-cost experiments to test ideas and on fostering curiosity about phenomena in the world.

Subjects

approximation | approximation | science | science | engineering | engineering | managing complexity | managing complexity | divide and conquer | divide and conquer | heterogeneous hierarchies | heterogeneous hierarchies | homogeneous hierarchies | homogeneous hierarchies | proportional reasoning | proportional reasoning | conservation/box models | conservation/box models | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | special cases | special cases | extreme cases | extreme cases | discretization | discretization | spring models | spring models | symmetry | symmetry | invariance | invariance | discarding information | discarding information | oil imports | oil imports | tree representations | tree representations | gold | gold | random walks | random walks | UNIX | UNIX | triangle bisection | triangle bisection | pentagonal heat flow | pentagonal heat flow | jump heights | jump heights | simple calculus | simple calculus | drag | drag | cycling | cycling | swimming | swimming | flying | flying | flight | flight | algebraic symmetry | algebraic symmetry | densities | densities | hydrogen size | hydrogen size | bending of light | bending of light | Buckingham Pi Theorem | Buckingham Pi Theorem | pulley acceleration | pulley acceleration | waves | waves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.781 Theory of Numbers (MIT) 18.781 Theory of Numbers (MIT)

Description

This course provides an elementary introduction to number theory with no algebraic prerequisites. Topics include primes, congruences, quadratic reciprocity, diophantine equations, irrational numbers, continued fractions and elliptic curves. This course provides an elementary introduction to number theory with no algebraic prerequisites. Topics include primes, congruences, quadratic reciprocity, diophantine equations, irrational numbers, continued fractions and elliptic curves.

Subjects

number theory with no algebraic prerequisites | number theory with no algebraic prerequisites | primes | congruences | primes | congruences | quadratic reciprocity | quadratic reciprocity | diophantine equations | diophantine equations | irrational numbers | irrational numbers | continued fractions | continued fractions | partitions | partitions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.782 Introduction to Arithmetic Geometry (MIT) 18.782 Introduction to Arithmetic Geometry (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to arithmetic geometry, a subject that lies at the intersection of algebraic geometry and number theory. Its primary motivation is the study of classical Diophantine problems from the modern perspective of algebraic geometry. This course is an introduction to arithmetic geometry, a subject that lies at the intersection of algebraic geometry and number theory. Its primary motivation is the study of classical Diophantine problems from the modern perspective of algebraic geometry.

Subjects

algebra | algebra | number theory | number theory | diophantine equations | diophantine equations | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | plane conics | plane conics | elliptic curves | elliptic curves | hyperelliptic curves | hyperelliptic curves | abelian varieties | abelian varieties | Tate-Shafarevich group | Tate-Shafarevich group

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.972 Algebraic Techniques and Semidefinite Optimization (MIT) 6.972 Algebraic Techniques and Semidefinite Optimization (MIT)

Description

This research-oriented course will focus on algebraic and computational techniques for optimization problems involving polynomial equations and inequalities with particular emphasis on the connections with semidefinite optimization. The course will develop in a parallel fashion several algebraic and numerical approaches to polynomial systems, with a view towards methods that simultaneously incorporate both elements. We will study both the complex and real cases, developing techniques of general applicability, and stressing convexity-based ideas, complexity results, and efficient implementations. Although we will use examples from several engineering areas, particular emphasis will be given to those arising from systems and control applications. This research-oriented course will focus on algebraic and computational techniques for optimization problems involving polynomial equations and inequalities with particular emphasis on the connections with semidefinite optimization. The course will develop in a parallel fashion several algebraic and numerical approaches to polynomial systems, with a view towards methods that simultaneously incorporate both elements. We will study both the complex and real cases, developing techniques of general applicability, and stressing convexity-based ideas, complexity results, and efficient implementations. Although we will use examples from several engineering areas, particular emphasis will be given to those arising from systems and control applications.

Subjects

algebraic and computational techniques | algebraic and computational techniques | optimization problems | optimization problems | polynomial equations | polynomial equations | inequalities | inequalities | semidefinite optimization | semidefinite optimization | convexity-based ideas | convexity-based ideas | complexity results | complexity results | efficient implementations | efficient implementations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

Numerical methods for solving problems arising in heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, chemical reaction engineering, and molecular simulation. Topics: numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations, solution of partial differential equations (e.g. Navier-Stokes), numerical methods in molecular simulation (dynamics, geometry optimization). All methods are presented within the context of chemical engineering problems. Familiarity with structured programming is assumed. The examples will use MATLAB®. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Robert Ashcraft, Sandeep Sharma, David Weingeist, and Nikolay Zaborenko for their work in preparing materials for this course site.

Subjects

Matlab | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | linear systems | scientific computing | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | probability theory | use of probability theory in physical modeling | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | finite difference techniques | finite element techniques | converting partial differential equations | Navier-Stokes equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.312 Algebraic Combinatorics (MIT) 18.312 Algebraic Combinatorics (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes the applications of algebra to combinatorics and conversely. The topics discussed include enumeration methods, partially ordered sets and lattices, matching theory, partitions and tableaux, algebraic graph theory, and combinatorics of polytopes. This course analyzes the applications of algebra to combinatorics and conversely. The topics discussed include enumeration methods, partially ordered sets and lattices, matching theory, partitions and tableaux, algebraic graph theory, and combinatorics of polytopes.

Subjects

Applications of algebra to combinatorics and conversely | Applications of algebra to combinatorics and conversely | enumeration methods | enumeration methods | partially ordered sets and lattices | partially ordered sets and lattices | matching theory | matching theory | partitions and tableaux | partitions and tableaux | algebraic graph theory | algebraic graph theory | combinatorics of polytopes | combinatorics of polytopes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata