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Analytical Science

Description

Wales undergraduate level and as a CPD training resource

Subjects

ukoer | sfsoer | oer | open educational resources | metadata | analytical science | cpd training resource | analytical chemistry | measurement science | analytical process model | skills for analytical science | skills for analytical chemistry | analytical sample preparation | separation and concentration of analytes | units of measurement | volumetric techniques | gravimetric techniques | calibration methods | standard-addition | method of internal-standards | statistical analysis of data | measurement uncertainty | chromatographic methods | thin layer chromatography | gc | gas chromatography | hplc | high-performance liquid chromatography | capillary electrophoresis | potentiometry | ion-selective electrodes | amperometry | coulometry | plated film thickness | electromagnetic spectrum | electronic transitions | vibrational energy | comparison of spectroscopic techniques | fluorescence spectroscopy | mid infra-red spectroscopy | near infra-red spectroscopy | aas | atomic absorption spectroscopy | atomic emission spectroscopy | inductively coupled plasme emission spectroscopy | icpms | icpes | atomic fluorescence spectroscopy | comparison of elemental analysis techniques | principles of mass spectroscopy | electron impact mass spectroscopy | chemical ionisation mass spectroscopy | quadrupole mass spectroscopy | time-of-flight mass analysers | ion-trap mass analysers | off-line sampling systems | at-line sampling systems | on-line sampling systems | in-line sampling systems | performance characteristics of analytical techniques | flow injection analysis | fia | process gc | process ir | process ms | process uv/visible | quality management | quality assurance | qa | vam principles | quality control | qc | analytical method validation | analytical method performance characteristics | sampling of solids | liquids and gases | measurement of ph | karl fischer titration | uv/visible spectroscopy | beer's law | beer-lambert law | deviations from beer's law | mid ir spectroscopy | near ir spectroscopy | raman spectroscopy | fourier transform spectroscopies | x-ray methods | x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy | gc-ms | lc-ms | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Analytical Science - modified Chapter 9

Description

An updated version of Chapter 9 from the Analytical Science course, also on JorumOpen (http://open.jorum.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/2964)

Subjects

ukoer | sfsoer | oer | open educational resources | analytical science | cpd training resource | analytical chemistry | measurement science | analytical process model | skills for analytical chemistry | skills for analytical science | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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2.672 Projects Laboratory (MIT) 2.672 Projects Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This is an engineering laboratory subject for mechanical engineering juniors and seniors. Major emphasis is on interplay between analytical and experimental methods in solution of research and development problems. Communication (written and oral) of results is also a strong component of the course. Groups of two or three students work together on three projects during the term. This is an engineering laboratory subject for mechanical engineering juniors and seniors. Major emphasis is on interplay between analytical and experimental methods in solution of research and development problems. Communication (written and oral) of results is also a strong component of the course. Groups of two or three students work together on three projects during the term.

Subjects

Engineering laboratory | Engineering laboratory | mechanical engineering | mechanical engineering | juniors | juniors | seniors | seniors | analytical and experimental methods | analytical and experimental methods | research and development problems | research and development problems | Communication (written and oral) | Communication (written and oral) | projects | projects | analytical method | analytical method | experimental method | experimental method | research and development | research and development | D | D

License

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2.672 Project Laboratory (MIT) 2.672 Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This is an engineering laboratory subject for mechanical engineering juniors and seniors. Major emphasis is on interplay between analytical and experimental methods in solution of research and development problems. Communication (written and oral) of results is also a strong component of the course. Groups of two or three students work together on three projects during the term. This is an engineering laboratory subject for mechanical engineering juniors and seniors. Major emphasis is on interplay between analytical and experimental methods in solution of research and development problems. Communication (written and oral) of results is also a strong component of the course. Groups of two or three students work together on three projects during the term.

Subjects

Engineering laboratory | Engineering laboratory | mechanical engineering | mechanical engineering | juniors | juniors | seniors | seniors | analytical and experimental methods | analytical and experimental methods | research and development problems | research and development problems | Communication (written and oral) | Communication (written and oral) | projects | projects | analytical method | analytical method | experimental method | experimental method | research and development | research and development | D | D

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT) 14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information 14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analytical tools | analysis | analysis | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | coordintation | coordintation | incomplete markets | incomplete markets | technolgy | technolgy | distribution | distribution | employment | employment | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | demographics | demographics | complementarities | complementarities | amplification | amplification | recursive equilibria | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | uncertainty | morris | morris | shin | shin | global games | global games | policy | policy | price | price | aggregation | aggregation | social learning | social learning | dynamic adjustment | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | heterogeneous agents | savings | savings | utility | utility | aiyagari | aiyagari | steady state | steady state | krusell | krusell | smith | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | growth | fluctuations | fluctuations | heterogeneity | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | time inconsistency | reputation | reputation | information | information | coordination games | coordination games

License

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6.S079 Nanomaker (MIT) 6.S079 Nanomaker (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course links clean energy sources and storage technology to energy consumption case studies to give students a concept of the full circle of production and consumption. Specifically, photovoltaic, organic photovoltaic, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity sources are applied to electrophoresis, lab on a chip, and paper microfluidic applications–relevant analytical techniques in biology and chemistry. Hands-on experimentation with everyday materials and equipment help connect the theory with the implementation. Complementary laboratories fabricating LEDs, organic LEDs and spectrometers introduce the diagnostic tools used to characterize energy efficiency.This course is one of many OCW Energy Courses, and it is an elective Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course links clean energy sources and storage technology to energy consumption case studies to give students a concept of the full circle of production and consumption. Specifically, photovoltaic, organic photovoltaic, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity sources are applied to electrophoresis, lab on a chip, and paper microfluidic applications–relevant analytical techniques in biology and chemistry. Hands-on experimentation with everyday materials and equipment help connect the theory with the implementation. Complementary laboratories fabricating LEDs, organic LEDs and spectrometers introduce the diagnostic tools used to characterize energy efficiency.This course is one of many OCW Energy Courses, and it is an elective

Subjects

clean energy | clean energy | energy sources | energy sources | energy storage | energy storage | energy consumption | energy consumption | photovoltaic | photovoltaic | piezoelectric | piezoelectric | thermoelectric | thermoelectric | LED | LED | light emitting diode | light emitting diode | organic LED | organic LED | analytical biology | analytical biology | analytical chemistry | analytical chemistry | microfluidics | microfluidics | spectrometer | spectrometer | energy efficiency | energy efficiency

License

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts. Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts.

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | reading | reading | writing | writing | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary texts | literary texts | Dickinson | Dickinson | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Hughes | Hughes | Chekhov | Chekhov | Joyce | Joyce | Walker | Walker | Melville | Melville | Morrison | Morrison | analytical skills | analytical skills | essays | essays | analysis | analysis | communication | communication | poetry | poetry | fiction | fiction | drama | drama | Lahiri | Lahiri | Frayn | Frayn | textuality | textuality | conceptualization | conceptualization | film | film | media | media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations (MIT) 11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations (MIT)

Description

Organizations and their programs often seem, at first glance, chaotic and without order. Students embarking on evaluations and similar research, therefore, feel perplexed when faced with a live organization. This is because we have been taught to expect a certain kind of rationality in the way organizations behave that is often different than that which actually drives them. As a result of this seeming mismatch between what we expect and the actual reality, students of planning and planners, and researchers and professional evaluators, often recoil from the chaos of reality, wondering why the organization is not doing what it is "supposed" to be doing; correspondingly, they often make recommendations for change that are unrealistic, or draw conclusions from evaluations of success or fail Organizations and their programs often seem, at first glance, chaotic and without order. Students embarking on evaluations and similar research, therefore, feel perplexed when faced with a live organization. This is because we have been taught to expect a certain kind of rationality in the way organizations behave that is often different than that which actually drives them. As a result of this seeming mismatch between what we expect and the actual reality, students of planning and planners, and researchers and professional evaluators, often recoil from the chaos of reality, wondering why the organization is not doing what it is "supposed" to be doing; correspondingly, they often make recommendations for change that are unrealistic, or draw conclusions from evaluations of success or fail

Subjects

organizations | organizations | organizational behavior | organizational behavior | government and nongovernment | government and nongovernment | sociology of organizations | sociology of organizations | political science | political science | public administration | public administration | chaotic organizational environments | chaotic organizational environments | implementation experience | implementation experience | analytical skills | analytical skills | projects | projects | and environments | and environments | developing-country and developed-country | developing-country and developed-country

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.220 International Management (MIT) 15.220 International Management (MIT)

Description

Companies today confront an increasing array of choices of markets, of locations for value adding activities, and of modes of crossing borders. This course focuses on the international dimensions of strategy and organization, and provides a framework for formulating strategies in an increasingly complex world economy, and for making those strategies work effectively. The first section of the course provides the basic frameworks for understanding competitiveness in international business at the level of the industry, location, and firm. These frameworks identify the opportunities presented in a dynamic global environment. But taking advantages of those opportunities faces enormous managerial challenges, and the second section of the course focuses on using and dee Companies today confront an increasing array of choices of markets, of locations for value adding activities, and of modes of crossing borders. This course focuses on the international dimensions of strategy and organization, and provides a framework for formulating strategies in an increasingly complex world economy, and for making those strategies work effectively. The first section of the course provides the basic frameworks for understanding competitiveness in international business at the level of the industry, location, and firm. These frameworks identify the opportunities presented in a dynamic global environment. But taking advantages of those opportunities faces enormous managerial challenges, and the second section of the course focuses on using and dee

Subjects

industry | industry | location | location | firm | firm | competitiveness | competitiveness | dynamic global environment | dynamic global environment | managerial challenges | managerial challenges | analytical tools | analytical tools

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations: How Organizations Behave (MIT) 11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations: How Organizations Behave (MIT)

Description

This class analyzes how organizations behave, both government and nongovernment, drawing on the literature of the sociology of organizations, political science, and public administration. The class seeks to demonstrate rationality in otherwise seemingly chaotic organizational environments and implementation experiences. It builds analytical skills for evaluating programs and projects, organizations, and environments, and draws equally on developing-country and developed-country literature. This class analyzes how organizations behave, both government and nongovernment, drawing on the literature of the sociology of organizations, political science, and public administration. The class seeks to demonstrate rationality in otherwise seemingly chaotic organizational environments and implementation experiences. It builds analytical skills for evaluating programs and projects, organizations, and environments, and draws equally on developing-country and developed-country literature.

Subjects

organizations | organizations | organizational behavior | organizational behavior | government and nongovernment | government and nongovernment | sociology of organizations | sociology of organizations | political science | political science | public administration | public administration | chaotic organizational environments | chaotic organizational environments | implementation experience | implementation experience | analytical skills | analytical skills | projects | projects | and environments | and environments | developing-country and developed-country | developing-country and developed-country

License

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21W.747 Rhetoric (MIT) 21W.747 Rhetoric (MIT)

Description

Introduction to 21W.747This course is an introduction to the history, the theory, the practice, and the implications (both social and ethical) of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. This semester, many of your skills will be deepened by practice, including your analytical skills, your critical thinking skills, your persuasive writing skills, and your oral presentation skills. In this course you will act as both a rhetor (a person who uses rhetoric) and a rhetorician (one who studies the art of rhetoric).Because the study of rhetoric has always had as one of its goals the creation of active and informed citizens and because rhetors write to influence the real world and thus to become agents of positive change, 21W.747 has an optional Service Learning (SL) component: You may elect to Introduction to 21W.747This course is an introduction to the history, the theory, the practice, and the implications (both social and ethical) of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. This semester, many of your skills will be deepened by practice, including your analytical skills, your critical thinking skills, your persuasive writing skills, and your oral presentation skills. In this course you will act as both a rhetor (a person who uses rhetoric) and a rhetorician (one who studies the art of rhetoric).Because the study of rhetoric has always had as one of its goals the creation of active and informed citizens and because rhetors write to influence the real world and thus to become agents of positive change, 21W.747 has an optional Service Learning (SL) component: You may elect to

Subjects

ethics | ethics | rhetoric | rhetoric | persuasion | persuasion | analytical skills | analytical skills | critical thinking | critical thinking | persuasive writing | persuasive writing | oral presentation | oral presentation

License

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17.872 Quantitative Research in Political Science and Public Policy (MIT) 17.872 Quantitative Research in Political Science and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with a rigorous introduction to Statistics for Political Science. Topics include basic mathematical tools used in social science modeling and statistics, probability theory, theory of estimation and inference, and statistical methods, especially differences of means and regression. The course is often taken by students outside of political science, especially those in business, urban studies, and various fields of public policy, such as public health. Examples draw heavily from political science, but some problems come from other areas, such as labor economics. This course provides students with a rigorous introduction to Statistics for Political Science. Topics include basic mathematical tools used in social science modeling and statistics, probability theory, theory of estimation and inference, and statistical methods, especially differences of means and regression. The course is often taken by students outside of political science, especially those in business, urban studies, and various fields of public policy, such as public health. Examples draw heavily from political science, but some problems come from other areas, such as labor economics.

Subjects

mathematical economics | mathematical economics | quatitative research | quatitative research | political science | political science | public policy | public policy | modeling | modeling | probability theory | probability theory | estimation | estimation | inference | inference | analytical methods | analytical methods | regression | regression | statistical means | statistical means | labor | labor | public health | public health

License

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | 21st century | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | realism | realism | liberalism | liberalism | institutionalism | institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | conflict | conflict | war | war | globalization | globalization | critical analysis | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | analytical structures | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | contentions | environmentalism | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | warfare | transformations | transformations | structures | structures | processes | processes

License

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15.356 How to Develop Breakthrough Products and Services (MIT) 15.356 How to Develop Breakthrough Products and Services (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. Firms must develop major innovations to prosper, but they don't know how to. However, recent research into the innovation process has made it possible to develop breakthroughs systematically. 15.356 How to Develop Breakthrough Products and Services explores several practical idea generation development methods. To convey the art required to implement each of these methodologies, experts are invited to present real cases to the class. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. Firms must develop major innovations to prosper, but they don't know how to. However, recent research into the innovation process has made it possible to develop breakthroughs systematically. 15.356 How to Develop Breakthrough Products and Services explores several practical idea generation development methods. To convey the art required to implement each of these methodologies, experts are invited to present real cases to the class.

Subjects

innovation | innovation | lead user | lead user | user innovation | user innovation | patents | patents | crowdsourcing | crowdsourcing | idea generation | idea generation | breakthrough innovation | breakthrough innovation | analytical marketing | analytical marketing | development methods | development methods | segmentation | segmentation | creativity | creativity | MIT Media Lab | MIT Media Lab

License

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1.561 Motion Based Design (MIT) 1.561 Motion Based Design (MIT)

Description

This course presents a rational basis for the preliminary design of motion-sensitive structures. Topics covered include: analytical and numerical techniques for establishing the optimal stiffness distribution, the role of damping in controlling motion, tuned mass dampers, base isolation systems, and active structural control. Examples illustrating the application of the motion-based design paradigm to building structures subjected to seismic excitation are discussed. This course presents a rational basis for the preliminary design of motion-sensitive structures. Topics covered include: analytical and numerical techniques for establishing the optimal stiffness distribution, the role of damping in controlling motion, tuned mass dampers, base isolation systems, and active structural control. Examples illustrating the application of the motion-based design paradigm to building structures subjected to seismic excitation are discussed.

Subjects

preliminary design | preliminary design | motion-sensitive structures | motion-sensitive structures | analytical techniques | analytical techniques | numerical techniques | numerical techniques | optimal stiffness distribution | optimal stiffness distribution | damping | damping | controlling motion | controlling motion | tuned mass dampers | tuned mass dampers | base isolation systems | base isolation systems | active structural control | active structural control | building structures | building structures | wind excitation | wind excitation | seismic excitation | seismic excitation | building design | building design | numerical analysis | numerical analysis | motion control | motion control | motion-based design | motion-based design | safety | safety | serviceability | serviceability | loadings | loadings | optimal stiffness | optimal stiffness | optimal damping | optimal damping | base isolation | base isolation

License

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9.93 Marathon Moral Reasoning Laboratory (MIT) 9.93 Marathon Moral Reasoning Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This seminar focuses on the cognitive science of moral reasoning. Philosophers debate how we decide which moral actions are permissible. Is it permissible to take one human life in order to save others? We have powerful and surprisingly rich and subtle intuitions to such questions.In this class, you will learn how intuitions can be studied using formal analytical paradigms and behavioral experiments. Thursday evening, meet to learn about recent advances in theories of moral reasoning. Overnight, formulate a hypothesis about the structure of moral reasoning and design a questionnaire-based experiment to test this. Friday, present and select 1-2 proposals and collect data; we will then reconvene to analyze and discuss results and implications for the structure of the moral mind.This course i This seminar focuses on the cognitive science of moral reasoning. Philosophers debate how we decide which moral actions are permissible. Is it permissible to take one human life in order to save others? We have powerful and surprisingly rich and subtle intuitions to such questions.In this class, you will learn how intuitions can be studied using formal analytical paradigms and behavioral experiments. Thursday evening, meet to learn about recent advances in theories of moral reasoning. Overnight, formulate a hypothesis about the structure of moral reasoning and design a questionnaire-based experiment to test this. Friday, present and select 1-2 proposals and collect data; we will then reconvene to analyze and discuss results and implications for the structure of the moral mind.This course i

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | moral actions | moral actions | permissible | permissible | human life | human life | intuition | intuition | analytical paradigm | analytical paradigm | behavioral experiment | behavioral experiment | questionnaire | questionnaire | experiment | experiment | structure of human mind | structure of human mind

License

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches. We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | women's studies | women's studies | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.747-1 Rhetoric (MIT) 21W.747-1 Rhetoric (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the history, the theory, the practice, and the implications (both social and ethical) of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. This semester, many of your skills will be deepened by practice, including your analytical skills, your critical thinking skills, your persuasive writing skills, and your oral presentation skills. In this course you will act as both a rhetor (a person who uses rhetoric) and a rhetorician (one who studies the art of rhetoric). This course is an introduction to the history, the theory, the practice, and the implications (both social and ethical) of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. This semester, many of your skills will be deepened by practice, including your analytical skills, your critical thinking skills, your persuasive writing skills, and your oral presentation skills. In this course you will act as both a rhetor (a person who uses rhetoric) and a rhetorician (one who studies the art of rhetoric).

Subjects

ethics | ethics | rhetoric | rhetoric | persuasion | persuasion | analytical skills | analytical skills | critical thinking | critical thinking | persuasive writing | persuasive writing | oral presentation | oral presentation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | 21st century | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | realism | realism | liberalism | liberalism | institutionalism | institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | conflict | conflict | war | war | globalization | globalization | critical analysis | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | analytical structures | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | contentions | environmentalism | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | warfare | transformations | transformations | structures | structures | processes | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introduction to Analytical Chemistry

Description

A general introduction to analytical chemistry with a special focus upon the analytical process, quality assurance, and guidance on solution preparation including volumetric and concentration calculations. It also includes a bibliography of useful texts for the analytical chemist.

Subjects

ukoer | sfsoer | analytical chemistry | analytical science | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Chemistry in Action: Laboratory Manual

Description

Laboratory manual describing 11 x 3 hour experiments in the area of forensic chemical analysis. Students are presented with a case scenario of a suspicious death, which they must investigate via a series of laboratory experiments. Students would normally work in groups and co-ordinate their results in a follow-up workshop.

Subjects

ukoer | sfsoer | analytical chemistry | analytical science | forensic science | forensic analysis | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Analytical Chemistry Techniques Manual

Description

A set of four separate guides which provide introductions to the principles and practical application of different analytical chemistry techniques, illustrated with simple diagrams and photographs of equipment: (1) introduction to analytical chemistry, focusing on the analytical process, quality assurance and general laboratory techniques e.g. solution preparation; (2) introduction to molecular spectroscopy, including UV-Vis, fluorescence, IR, MS and NMR spectroscopy; (3) introduction to chromatography, including TLC, GC, HPLC and ion chromatography; (4) introduction to atomic spectrometry, including ICP-AES, ICP-MS, XRF and AAS. Each guide is also available for separate download as a pdf file.

Subjects

ukoer | sfsoer | analytical chemistry | analytical science | chromatography | spectroscopy | spectrometry | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Analytical chemistry scenarios

Description

Pre-lab exercises, pre-lab tests, lab scripts and post-lab questions for two scenarios in analytical chemistry ("Is it the Real Thing?" and "Chemistry at the Night Club"). Written for second year undergraduste module for chemistry and bioscience students. Could be used from first year undergraduate to Masters level with modifications. Stored here as a self-extracting .rar file - save it to your computer, then double click on it to extract files. Documents are in .rtf format for easy modification.

Subjects

ukoer | sfsoer | analytical chemistry | analytical science | forensic science | laboratory practical | drug analysis | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.747-1 Rhetoric (MIT) 21W.747-1 Rhetoric (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the theory, the practice, and the implications (both social and ethical) of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. This semester, many of your skills will have the opportunity to be deepened by practice, including your analytical and critical thinking skills, your persuasive writing skills, and your oral presentation skills. In this course you will act as both a rhetor (a person who uses rhetoric) and as a rhetorical critic (one who studies the art of rhetoric). Both write to persuade; both ask and answer important questions. Always one of their goals is to create new knowledge for all of us, so no endeavor in this class is a "mere exercise." This course is an introduction to the theory, the practice, and the implications (both social and ethical) of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. This semester, many of your skills will have the opportunity to be deepened by practice, including your analytical and critical thinking skills, your persuasive writing skills, and your oral presentation skills. In this course you will act as both a rhetor (a person who uses rhetoric) and as a rhetorical critic (one who studies the art of rhetoric). Both write to persuade; both ask and answer important questions. Always one of their goals is to create new knowledge for all of us, so no endeavor in this class is a "mere exercise."

Subjects

ethics | ethics | rhetoric | rhetoric | persuasion | persuasion | analytical skills | analytical skills | critical thinking | critical thinking | persuasive writing | persuasive writing | oral presentation | oral presentation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.747-1 Rhetoric (MIT) 21W.747-1 Rhetoric (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the history, the theory, the practice, and the implications (both social and ethical) of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. By the end of the semester, you will have been exposed to several of the key concepts of rhetoric (e.g., ethos, pathos, logos, invention, style, arrangement, kairos, stasis, commonplaces) and to the over-riding importance of writing to your audience. You will have gotten a taste of rhetorical history and theory. You will explore and analyze and respond to some key texts by significant writers. You will have had a chance to practice speaking and debating before the class. You will have written and revised several texts. You will have examined some of your core beliefs and assumptions. In this course you will act as both a rheto This course is an introduction to the history, the theory, the practice, and the implications (both social and ethical) of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. By the end of the semester, you will have been exposed to several of the key concepts of rhetoric (e.g., ethos, pathos, logos, invention, style, arrangement, kairos, stasis, commonplaces) and to the over-riding importance of writing to your audience. You will have gotten a taste of rhetorical history and theory. You will explore and analyze and respond to some key texts by significant writers. You will have had a chance to practice speaking and debating before the class. You will have written and revised several texts. You will have examined some of your core beliefs and assumptions. In this course you will act as both a rheto

Subjects

ethics | ethics | rhetoric | rhetoric | persuasion | persuasion | analytical skills | analytical skills | critical thinking | critical thinking | persuasive writing | persuasive writing | oral presentation | oral presentation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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