Searching for ancient : 93 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4

3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | stress transformation | elasticity | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | Case studies | materials selection | materials selection | bicycle frames | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | objects of material culture | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | materials processing | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | ceramics | fibers | ideology | values | anthropology | archaeology | history | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | objects of material culture | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | materials processing | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | ceramics | fibers | ideology | values | anthropology | archaeology | history | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Oliver Taplin on Classics

Description

Professor Oliver Taplin, an authority on classics and the performance of ancient drama, talks about the subject and his research. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

theatre | ancient greek | drama | performance | classics | ancient roman | theatre | ancient greek | drama | performance | classics | ancient roman

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129007/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Oliver Taplin on Classics

Description

Professor Oliver Taplin, an authority on classics and the performance of ancient drama, talks about the subject and his research.

Subjects

theatre | ancient greek | drama | performance | classics | ancient roman | theatre | ancient greek | drama | performance | classics | ancient roman

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://rss.oucs.ox.ac.uk/oucs/oxonian_interviews-audio/rss20.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Mythology in German literature "Medea" Mythology in German literature "Medea"

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010. We are surrounded by materials from and references to ancient mythology: we talk about the Oedipus-complex, name spaceships Apollo and powerful detergents Ajax, have songs about Cupid drawing back his bow and associate Oedipus with Freud rather than Sophocles, Ulysses with James Joyce rather than Homer. Literature, in particular, uses ancient mythology as a rich source to describe powerful emotions, cunning politics or psychological drama. This module will explore how selected German literary texts use motifs from Ancient mythology and how the individual authors combine the ‘old’ stories with their ‘new’ content and message. We will focus on Medea, the powerful and This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010. We are surrounded by materials from and references to ancient mythology: we talk about the Oedipus-complex, name spaceships Apollo and powerful detergents Ajax, have songs about Cupid drawing back his bow and associate Oedipus with Freud rather than Sophocles, Ulysses with James Joyce rather than Homer. Literature, in particular, uses ancient mythology as a rich source to describe powerful emotions, cunning politics or psychological drama. This module will explore how selected German literary texts use motifs from Ancient mythology and how the individual authors combine the ‘old’ stories with their ‘new’ content and message. We will focus on Medea, the powerful and

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ancient mythology | ancient mythology | German literary texts | German literary texts | Medea | Medea | Euripides ancient version | Euripides ancient version | ukoer | ukoer | modern languages | modern languages

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Amphitheatre origins

Description

A flash asset / diagram showing a plan view of an amphitheatre and detailing the origins of western traditional theatre.

Subjects

theatre | stage | performance | drama | architecture | ancient history | ancient greece | ancient rome | PERFORMING ARTS | Architecture | Linguistics | Creative Arts and Design | Learning | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL05 = SCQF 5 | Intermediate level | Intermediate | NICAT 2 | CQFW 2 | Intermediate | GSCE A-C | NVQ 2 | | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | planning | design | related subjects | K000 | W000 | Q000 | L

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.605 Introduction to the History and Theory of Architecture (MIT) 4.605 Introduction to the History and Theory of Architecture (MIT)

Description

This course is a global-oriented survey of the history of architecture, from the prehistoric to the sixteenth century. It treats buildings and environments, including cities, in the context of the cultural and civilizational history. It offers an introduction to design principles and analysis. Being global, it aims to give the student perspective on the larger pushes and pulls that influence architecture and its meanings, whether these be economic, political, religious or climatic. This course is a global-oriented survey of the history of architecture, from the prehistoric to the sixteenth century. It treats buildings and environments, including cities, in the context of the cultural and civilizational history. It offers an introduction to design principles and analysis. Being global, it aims to give the student perspective on the larger pushes and pulls that influence architecture and its meanings, whether these be economic, political, religious or climatic.

Subjects

vernacular architecture | vernacular architecture | ancient civilizations | ancient civilizations | urbanism | urbanism | cities | cities | buildings | buildings | design principles | design principles | architecture analysis | architecture analysis | classical civilizations | classical civilizations | Greece | Greece | Rome | Rome | Asia | Asia | Islam | Islam | cathedrals | cathedrals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | number | number | irrational number | irrational number | ratio | ratio | ethics | ethics | logos | logos | logic | logic | ancient knowing | ancient knowing | modern knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | Greek conception of number | idea of number | idea of number | courage | courage | justice | justice | pursuit of truth | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

If Venice Dies - Italian Studies at Oxford Lecture

Description

Salvatore Settis' English talk is on Venice and the future of historic cities (9 June 2015). Salvatore Settis is a world-famous expert on archaeology and the arts, and an iconic public intellectual in Italy; a man who has devoted his life to the defence of Italy's cultural assets and landscape. He is the author of dozens of books and hundreds of articles, contributes vehement articles to national newspapers, and makes memorable television appearances. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

italy | Venice | city | modern | ancient | skyscraper | italy | Venice | city | modern | ancient | skyscraper | 2015-06-09

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129130/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.986 The Human Past: Introduction to Archaeology (MIT) 3.986 The Human Past: Introduction to Archaeology (MIT)

Description

This class introduces the multidisciplinary nature of archaeology, both in theory and practice. Lectures provide a comparative examination of the origins of agriculture and the rise of early civilizations in the ancient Near East and Mesoamerica. The laboratory sessions provide practical experience in aspects of archaeological field methods and analytical techniques including the examination of stone, ceramic, and metal artifacts and bone materials. Lab sessions have occasional problem sets which are completed outside of class. This class introduces the multidisciplinary nature of archaeology, both in theory and practice. Lectures provide a comparative examination of the origins of agriculture and the rise of early civilizations in the ancient Near East and Mesoamerica. The laboratory sessions provide practical experience in aspects of archaeological field methods and analytical techniques including the examination of stone, ceramic, and metal artifacts and bone materials. Lab sessions have occasional problem sets which are completed outside of class.

Subjects

Human | Human | hunter/gatherer | hunter/gatherer | society | society | history | history | agriculture | agriculture | prehistoric | prehistoric | prehistory | prehistory | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | civilization | civilization | ancient civilization | ancient civilization | technology | technology | urbanization | urbanization | Neolithic | Neolithic | Sumer | Sumer | Natufian | Natufian | Uruk | Uruk | Maya | Maya | Olmec | Olmec | Tehuancan | Tehuancan | decline | decline | collapse | collapse | stone age | stone age | city-state | city-state | Universal Transverse Mercator grid | Universal Transverse Mercator grid | UTM | UTM

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.405J The Ancient City (MIT) 21H.405J The Ancient City (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world, by analyzing a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism. This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world, by analyzing a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism.

Subjects

21H.405 | 21H.405 | 11.012 | 11.012 | archaeology | archaeology | Greece | Greece | Rome | Rome | Greek | Greek | Roman | Roman | city | city | urban | urban | architecture | architecture | political | political | social | social | economic | economic | literary | literary | evidence | evidence | space | space | Athens | Athens | Paestum | Paestum | Pompeii | Pompeii | theoretical frameworks | theoretical frameworks | ancient urbanism | ancient urbanism | 21.405 | 21.405 | 11.021J | 11.021J | 11.02 | 11.02

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT) 21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Rome | Rome | ancient | ancient | world | world | origins | origins | fifth century A.D. | fifth century A.D. | Kingship | Kingship | Republican form | Republican form | conquest | conquest | Italy | Italy | Roman expansion | Roman expansion | Pyrrhus | Pyrrhus | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | classes | classes | courts | courts | Roman revolution | Roman revolution | Augustus | Augustus | empire | empire | Virgil | Virgil | Vandals | Vandals | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | provinces | provinces | primary sources | primary sources | translation | translation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

s New Place in the World - Classics Alumni Day 15th March 2014

Description

Prof Nicholas Purcell delivers his lecture "The Roman Empire's New Place in the World" as part of the Alumni day - "Classics from Helen to the Hijaz" Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

roman empire | classics | ancient history | classics alumni day | roman empire | classics | ancient history | classics alumni day | 2014-03-14

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129065/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT) 21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century. This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | medieval | ancient history | ancient history | europe | europe | culture | culture | politics | politics | mediterranean | mediterranean | germanic | germanic | byzantine | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | carolingian renaissance | islamic | islamic | crusades | crusades | religion | religion | economics | economics | feudalism | feudalism | barbarian | barbarian | charlemagne | charlemagne | england | england | ottonian | ottonian | empire | empire | rome | rome | gothic | gothic | monarchy | monarchy | Western Europe | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | Mediterranean civilization | social development | social development | cultural development | cultural development | political development | political development | religious life | religious life | women | women | high medieval economy | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | high medieval culture | twelfth century | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT) STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This subject introduces the history of science from antiquity to the present. Students consider the impact of philosophy, art, magic, social structure, and folk knowledge on the development of what has come to be called "science" in the Western tradition, including those fields today designated as physics, biology, chemistry, medicine, astronomy and the mind sciences. Topics include concepts of matter, nature, motion, body, heavens, and mind as these have been shaped over the course of history. Students read original works by Aristotle, Vesalius, Newton, Lavoisier, Darwin, Freud, and Einstein, among others. This subject introduces the history of science from antiquity to the present. Students consider the impact of philosophy, art, magic, social structure, and folk knowledge on the development of what has come to be called "science" in the Western tradition, including those fields today designated as physics, biology, chemistry, medicine, astronomy and the mind sciences. Topics include concepts of matter, nature, motion, body, heavens, and mind as these have been shaped over the course of history. Students read original works by Aristotle, Vesalius, Newton, Lavoisier, Darwin, Freud, and Einstein, among others.

Subjects

history of science | history of science | philosophy | philosophy | ancient history | ancient history | medieval history | medieval history | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | natural history | natural history | cosmology | cosmology | psychology | psychology | relativity | relativity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT) 21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.405J The Ancient City (MIT) 21H.405J The Ancient City (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world, by analyzing a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism. This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world, by analyzing a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism.

Subjects

21H.405 | 21H.405 | 11.012 | 11.012 | archaeology | archaeology | Greece | Greece | Rome | Rome | Greek | Greek | Roman | Roman | city | city | urban | urban | architecture | architecture | political | political | social | social | economic | economic | literary | literary | evidence | evidence | space | space | Athens | Athens | Paestum | Paestum | Pompeii | Pompeii | theoretical frameworks | theoretical frameworks | ancient urbanism | ancient urbanism | 21.405 | 21.405 | 11.021J | 11.021J | 11.02 | 11.02

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT) 21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Rome | Rome | ancient | ancient | world | world | origins | origins | fifth century A.D. | fifth century A.D. | Kingship | Kingship | Republican form | Republican form | conquest | conquest | Italy | Italy | Roman expansion | Roman expansion | Pyrrhus | Pyrrhus | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | classes | classes | courts | courts | Roman revolution | Roman revolution | Augustus | Augustus | empire | empire | Virgil | Virgil | Vandals | Vandals | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | provinces | provinces | primary sources | primary sources | translation | translation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Rocking the Cradle...6,000 Years of Geological Impact in Greece

Description

From the 2010 Alumni Weekend. Phillip England talks about the history of Greece through its many earthquakes and seismic activity over the last 6000 years and shows how these events shaped the ancient world's history. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ancient | geology | alumni | earthquakes | greece | classics | 2010 | geography | ancient | geology | alumni | earthquakes | greece | classics | 2010 | geography | 2010-09-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129169/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.960 Syntactic Models (MIT) 24.960 Syntactic Models (MIT)

Description

This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others. This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others.

Subjects

architectures | architectures | syntax module of grammar | syntax module of grammar | models | models | ancient and medieval proposals | ancient and medieval proposals | structuralism | structuralism | early generative grammar | early generative grammar | generative semantics | generative semantics | government-binding theory/minimalism | government-binding theory/minimalism | LFG | LFG | HPSG | HPSG | TAG | TAG | functionalist perspectives | functionalist perspectives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-24.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.200 Ancient Philosophy (MIT) 24.200 Ancient Philosophy (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint the student with some of the ancient Greek contributions to the Western philosophical and scientific tradition. We will examine a broad range of central philosophical themes concerning: nature, law, justice, knowledge, virtue, happiness, and death. There will be a strong emphasis on analyses of arguments found in the texts. This course will acquaint the student with some of the ancient Greek contributions to the Western philosophical and scientific tradition. We will examine a broad range of central philosophical themes concerning: nature, law, justice, knowledge, virtue, happiness, and death. There will be a strong emphasis on analyses of arguments found in the texts.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | ancient | ancient | Greek western | Greek western | philosophical | philosophical | scientific | scientific | tradition | tradition | themes | themes | nature | nature | law | law | justice | justice | knowledge | knowledge | virtue | virtue | happiness | happiness | death | death | analysis | analysis | arguments | arguments | text | text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-24.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Greek theatre quiz

Description

Interactive drag and drop flash quiz on the layout of the ancient Greek theatre.

Subjects

drama | architecture | ancient history | theatre | ancient greece | PERFORMING ARTS | Architecture | Linguistics | Creative Arts and Design | Learning | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL05 = SCQF 5 | Intermediate level | Intermediate | NICAT 2 | CQFW 2 | Intermediate | GSCE A-C | NVQ 2 | | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | planning | design | related subjects | K000 | W000 | Q000 | L

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT) 21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century. This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | medieval | ancient history | ancient history | europe | europe | culture | culture | politics | politics | mediterranean | mediterranean | germanic | germanic | byzantine | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | carolingian renaissance | islamic | islamic | crusades | crusades | religion | religion | economics | economics | feudalism | feudalism | barbarian | barbarian | charlemagne | charlemagne | england | england | ottonian | ottonian | empire | empire | rome | rome | gothic | gothic | monarchy | monarchy | Western Europe | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | Mediterranean civilization | social development | social development | cultural development | cultural development | political development | political development | religious life | religious life | women | women | high medieval economy | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | high medieval culture | twelfth century | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata