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Topografía, Cartografía y Geodesia Topografía, Cartografía y Geodesia

Description

La asignatura se ocupa de formar al alumno en las materias relacionadas con la topografía general (tanto aparatos como métodos), las aplicaciones cartograficas y los sistemas de información geográfica como herramienta fundamental en el manejo de la información territorial. La asignatura se ocupa de formar al alumno en las materias relacionadas con la topografía general (tanto aparatos como métodos), las aplicaciones cartograficas y los sistemas de información geográfica como herramienta fundamental en el manejo de la información territorial.

Subjects

equialtímetro | equialtímetro | planimetría | planimetría | escala | escala | levantamiento topográfico | levantamiento topográfico | goniómetro | goniómetro | altimetría | altimetría | fotogrametría | fotogrametría | acimut | acimut | sistemas de representación | sistemas de representación | Ingeniería Cartográfica | Geodésica y Fotogrametría | Ingeniería Cartográfica | Geodésica y Fotogrametría

License

Copyright 2009, by the Contributing Authors http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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STS.S28 Godzilla and the Bullet Train: Technology and Culture in Modern Japan (MIT) STS.S28 Godzilla and the Bullet Train: Technology and Culture in Modern Japan (MIT)

Description

This course explores how and why Japan, a late-comer to modernization, emerged as an industrial power and the world's second-richest nation, notwithstanding its recent difficulties. We are particularly concerned with the historical development of technology in Japan especially after 1945, giving particular attention to the interplays between business, ideology, technology, and culture. We will discuss key historical phenomena that symbolize modern Japan as a technological power in the world; specific examples to be discussed in class include kamikaze aircraft, the Shinkansen high-speed bullet train, Godzilla, and anime. This course explores how and why Japan, a late-comer to modernization, emerged as an industrial power and the world's second-richest nation, notwithstanding its recent difficulties. We are particularly concerned with the historical development of technology in Japan especially after 1945, giving particular attention to the interplays between business, ideology, technology, and culture. We will discuss key historical phenomena that symbolize modern Japan as a technological power in the world; specific examples to be discussed in class include kamikaze aircraft, the Shinkansen high-speed bullet train, Godzilla, and anime.

Subjects

modern japan | modern japan | transformation of japan | transformation of japan | nationalism | nationalism | japanese culture | japanese culture | postwar japan | postwar japan | anime | anime | japanese media | japanese media | japanese history | japanese history | modernization | modernization | cultural ideology | cultural ideology | Godzilla | Godzilla | technology transfer | technology transfer | shinkansen | shinkansen

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Serial Storytelling (MIT) 21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Serial Storytelling (MIT)

Description

Serial Storytelling examines the ways the passing and unfolding of time structures narratives in a range of media. From Rembrandt's lifetime of self-portraits to The Wire, Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers to contemporary journalism and reportage, we will focus on the relationships between popular culture and art, the problems of evaluation and audience, and the ways these works function within their social context. Serial Storytelling examines the ways the passing and unfolding of time structures narratives in a range of media. From Rembrandt's lifetime of self-portraits to The Wire, Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers to contemporary journalism and reportage, we will focus on the relationships between popular culture and art, the problems of evaluation and audience, and the ways these works function within their social context.

Subjects

serial | serial | storytelling | storytelling | narrative | narrative | seriality | seriality | Tennyson | Tennyson | memoriam | memoriam | wire | wire | David Simon | David Simon | Rembrandt | Rembrandt | self-portraits | self-portraits | blackbird | blackbird | Wallace Stevens | Wallace Stevens | Omar | Omar | Auden | Auden | Goya | Goya | Disasters of War | Disasters of War | War | War | Hogarth | Hogarth | Superman | Superman | Myth of Superman | Myth of Superman | Myth of Sisyphus | Myth of Sisyphus | Myth of Fingerprints | Myth of Fingerprints | photography | photography | Muybridge | Muybridge | Edweard | Edweard | Edweird | Edweird | Leland Stanford | Leland Stanford | Camp Stanford | Camp Stanford | Duchamp | Duchamp | Nude Descending | Nude Descending | Nude Ascending | Nude Ascending | Nude Suspended | Nude Suspended | journalism | journalism | animals eating people | animals eating people | Orwell | Orwell | Art is Propaganda | Art is Propaganda | McLuhan | McLuhan | Elegy | Elegy | Mourning | Mourning | Morte D'Arthur | Morte D'Arthur | Epic | Epic | Dickens | Dickens | Pickwick | Pickwick | Bleak House | Bleak House | Sherlock | Sherlock | Holmes | Holmes | Slaughterhouse | Slaughterhouse | Literature | Literature | Murder | Murder | English Murder | English Murder | Portlandia | Portlandia | Battlestar Galactica | Battlestar Galactica | Spoiler Alert | Spoiler Alert | Downton Abbey | Downton Abbey | Downtown Abby | Downtown Abby | social game | social game | anime | anime | chaplin | chaplin | gold rush | gold rush | comics | comics | remediation | remediation | mediation | mediation | dismediation | dismediation | transmediation | transmediation | procedural | procedural

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.039J Gender and Japanese Popular Culture (MIT) 21G.039J Gender and Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines relationships between identity and participation in Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities, and culture. It emphasizes contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power and value in global culture industries. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music, anime and feature films, video games, contemporary literature, and online communication. Students present analyses and develop a final project based on a particular aspect of gender and popular culture. This course examines relationships between identity and participation in Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities, and culture. It emphasizes contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power and value in global culture industries. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music, anime and feature films, video games, contemporary literature, and online communication. Students present analyses and develop a final project based on a particular aspect of gender and popular culture.

Subjects

gender | gender | Japan | Japan | culture | culture | Pecha Kucha | Pecha Kucha | media theory | media theory | manga | manga | inequality | inequality | economics | economics | robots | robots | technology | technology | anime | anime | anthropology | anthropology | queer | queer | transgender | transgender | hostess club | hostess club | feminist social theory | feminist social theory | gender traits | gender traits | fujoshi | fujoshi | women | women | Princess Jellyfish | Princess Jellyfish | Kuragehime | Kuragehime | convergence culture | convergence culture | participatory culture | participatory culture | capital | capital | debt | debt | power | power | slavery | slavery | sexism | sexism | Takarazuka | Takarazuka | host club | host club | masculinity | masculinity | seduction | seduction | Onnagata | Onnagata | Kabuki theater | Kabuki theater | idols | idols | virtual idol | virtual idol | games | games | Tokyo | Tokyo

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.065 Japanese Literature and Cinema (MIT) 21G.065 Japanese Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

This course includes surveys for both cinematic and literary representations of diverse eras and aspects of Japanese culture such as the classical era, the samurai age, wartime Japan and the atomic bombings, social change in the postwar period, and the appropriation of foreign cultural themes, with an emphasis on the modern period. The directors include Akira Kurosawa and Hiroshi Teshigahara. The authors include Kobo Abe and Yukio Mishima. The films are shown with subtitles in English. The course is taught in English. This course includes surveys for both cinematic and literary representations of diverse eras and aspects of Japanese culture such as the classical era, the samurai age, wartime Japan and the atomic bombings, social change in the postwar period, and the appropriation of foreign cultural themes, with an emphasis on the modern period. The directors include Akira Kurosawa and Hiroshi Teshigahara. The authors include Kobo Abe and Yukio Mishima. The films are shown with subtitles in English. The course is taught in English.

Subjects

japanese aesthetics | japanese aesthetics | suicide | suicide | pressure of daily life | pressure of daily life | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | contemporary japan | contemporary japan | traditional japan | traditional japan | anime | anime | surrealism | surrealism | false realism | false realism | the absurd | the absurd | humor | humor | japan | japan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.064 Intro to Japanese Culture (MIT) 21G.064 Intro to Japanese Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines the major aesthetic, social, and political elements which have shaped modern Japanese culture and society. There are readings on contemporary Japan and historical evolution of the culture are coordinated with study of literary texts, film, and art, along with an analysis of everyday life and leisure activities. This course examines the major aesthetic, social, and political elements which have shaped modern Japanese culture and society. There are readings on contemporary Japan and historical evolution of the culture are coordinated with study of literary texts, film, and art, along with an analysis of everyday life and leisure activities.

Subjects

Japan | Japan | Japanese culture | Japanese culture | otaku | otaku | tale of heike | tale of heike | tale of genji | tale of genji | hiroshima | hiroshima | modern japan | modern japan | history of japan | history of japan | anime | anime

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT) 21G.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity? This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | global economy | labor market | labor market | colonization | colonization | empire | empire | trade | trade | world music | world music | cuisine | cuisine | sports | sports | sex work | sex work | podcasts | podcasts | Islamic Spain | Islamic Spain | architecture | architecture | Silk Road | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | cultural appropriation | exotification | exotification | authenticity | authenticity | immigration | immigration | assimilation | assimilation | anime | anime | capitalism | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT) 21G.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries. This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries.

Subjects

japan | japan | popular culture | popular culture | media | media | capitalism | capitalism | comics | comics | hip-hop | hip-hop | music | music | animation | animation | movie | movie | sports | sports | sexuality | sexuality | race | race | gender | gender | fan communities | fan communities | culture | culture | manga | manga | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | anime | anime | Japanese animated films | Japanese animated films | power | power | global culture industries | global culture industries | 21F.039 | 21F.039 | 21F.037 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries.

Subjects

japan | popular culture | media | capitalism | comics | hip-hop | music | animation | movie | sports | sexuality | race | gender | fan communities | culture | manga | pop | popular music | anime | Japanese animated films | power | global culture industries

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries.

Subjects

japan | popular culture | media | capitalism | comics | hip-hop | music | animation | movie | sports | sexuality | race | gender | fan communities | culture | manga | pop | popular music | anime | Japanese animated films | power | global culture industries | 21F.039 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Serial Storytelling (MIT)

Description

Serial Storytelling examines the ways the passing and unfolding of time structures narratives in a range of media. From Rembrandt's lifetime of self-portraits to The Wire, Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers to contemporary journalism and reportage, we will focus on the relationships between popular culture and art, the problems of evaluation and audience, and the ways these works function within their social context.

Subjects

serial | storytelling | narrative | seriality | Tennyson | memoriam | wire | David Simon | Rembrandt | self-portraits | blackbird | Wallace Stevens | Omar | Auden | Goya | Disasters of War | War | Hogarth | Superman | Myth of Superman | Myth of Sisyphus | Myth of Fingerprints | photography | Muybridge | Edweard | Edweird | Leland Stanford | Camp Stanford | Duchamp | Nude Descending | Nude Ascending | Nude Suspended | journalism | animals eating people | Orwell | Art is Propaganda | McLuhan | Elegy | Mourning | Morte D'Arthur | Epic | Dickens | Pickwick | Bleak House | Sherlock | Holmes | Slaughterhouse | Literature | Murder | English Murder | Portlandia | Battlestar Galactica | Spoiler Alert | Downton Abbey | Downtown Abby | social game | anime | chaplin | gold rush | comics | remediation | mediation | dismediation | transmediation | procedural

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.S28 Godzilla and the Bullet Train: Technology and Culture in Modern Japan (MIT)

Description

This course explores how and why Japan, a late-comer to modernization, emerged as an industrial power and the world's second-richest nation, notwithstanding its recent difficulties. We are particularly concerned with the historical development of technology in Japan especially after 1945, giving particular attention to the interplays between business, ideology, technology, and culture. We will discuss key historical phenomena that symbolize modern Japan as a technological power in the world; specific examples to be discussed in class include kamikaze aircraft, the Shinkansen high-speed bullet train, Godzilla, and anime.

Subjects

modern japan | transformation of japan | nationalism | japanese culture | postwar japan | anime | japanese media | japanese history | modernization | cultural ideology | Godzilla | technology transfer | shinkansen

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.064 Intro to Japanese Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines the major aesthetic, social, and political elements which have shaped modern Japanese culture and society. There are readings on contemporary Japan and historical evolution of the culture are coordinated with study of literary texts, film, and art, along with an analysis of everyday life and leisure activities.

Subjects

Japan | Japanese culture | otaku | tale of heike | tale of genji | hiroshima | modern japan | history of japan | anime

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.065 Japanese Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

This course includes surveys for both cinematic and literary representations of diverse eras and aspects of Japanese culture such as the classical era, the samurai age, wartime Japan and the atomic bombings, social change in the postwar period, and the appropriation of foreign cultural themes, with an emphasis on the modern period. The directors include Akira Kurosawa and Hiroshi Teshigahara. The authors include Kobo Abe and Yukio Mishima. The films are shown with subtitles in English. The course is taught in English.

Subjects

japanese aesthetics | suicide | pressure of daily life | gender | sexuality | contemporary japan | traditional japan | anime | surrealism | false realism | the absurd | humor | japan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.039J Gender and Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines relationships between identity and participation in Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities, and culture. It emphasizes contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power and value in global culture industries. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music, anime and feature films, video games, contemporary literature, and online communication. Students present analyses and develop a final project based on a particular aspect of gender and popular culture.

Subjects

gender | Japan | culture | Pecha Kucha | media theory | manga | inequality | economics | robots | technology | anime | anthropology | queer | transgender | hostess club | feminist social theory | gender traits | fujoshi | women | Princess Jellyfish | Kuragehime | convergence culture | participatory culture | capital | debt | power | slavery | sexism | Takarazuka | host club | masculinity | seduction | Onnagata | Kabuki theater | idols | virtual idol | games | Tokyo

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | podcasts | Islamic Spain | architecture | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.020J Globalization: The Good, the Bad and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders. We will pay attention to the subtle interplay of history, geography, language and cultural norms that gave rise to specific ways of life. The materials for the course include fiction, nonfiction, audio pieces, maps and visual materials.

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | human trafficking | architecture | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism | ISIS | slavery | ebola | infectious diseases | NAFTA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.064 Intro to Japanese Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines the major aesthetic, social, and political elements which have shaped modern Japanese culture and society. There are readings on contemporary Japan and historical evolution of the culture are coordinated with study of literary texts, film, and art, along with an analysis of everyday life and leisure activities.

Subjects

Japan | Japanese culture | otaku | tale of heike | tale of genji | hiroshima | modern japan | history of japan | anime

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | podcasts | Islamic Spain | architecture | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.064 Intro to Japanese Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines the major aesthetic, social, and political elements which have shaped modern Japanese culture and society. There are readings on contemporary Japan and historical evolution of the culture are coordinated with study of literary texts, film, and art, along with an analysis of everyday life and leisure activities.

Subjects

Japan | Japanese culture | otaku | tale of heike | tale of genji | hiroshima | modern japan | history of japan | anime

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.065 Japanese Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

This course includes surveys for both cinematic and literary representations of diverse eras and aspects of Japanese culture such as the classical era, the samurai age, wartime Japan and the atomic bombings, social change in the postwar period, and the appropriation of foreign cultural themes, with an emphasis on the modern period. The directors include Akira Kurosawa and Hiroshi Teshigahara. The authors include Kobo Abe and Yukio Mishima. The films are shown with subtitles in English. The course is taught in English.

Subjects

japanese aesthetics | suicide | pressure of daily life | gender | sexuality | contemporary japan | traditional japan | anime | surrealism | false realism | the absurd | humor | japan

License

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21F.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | podcasts | Islamic Spain | architecture | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries.

Subjects

japan | popular culture | media | capitalism | comics | hip-hop | music | animation | movie | sports | sexuality | race | gender | fan communities | culture | manga | pop | popular music | anime | Japanese animated films | power | global culture industries

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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