Searching for antiquity : 31 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT) 12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

The interactive Earth system: Biology in geologic, environmental and climate change throughout Earth history. Since life began it has continually shaped and re-shaped the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. Introduces the concept of "life as a geological agent" and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared. Topics include the origin of the solar system and the early Earth atmosphere; the origin and evolution of life and its influence on climate up through and including the modern age and the problem of global warming; the global carbon cycle; and astrobiology. The interactive Earth system: Biology in geologic, environmental and climate change throughout Earth history. Since life began it has continually shaped and re-shaped the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. Introduces the concept of "life as a geological agent" and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared. Topics include the origin of the solar system and the early Earth atmosphere; the origin and evolution of life and its influence on climate up through and including the modern age and the problem of global warming; the global carbon cycle; and astrobiology.

Subjects

Big Bang | Big Bang | carbon cycle | carbon cycle | geobiochemistry | geobiochemistry | Solar System formation | Solar System formation | evolution | evolution | isotopic analysis: climate | isotopic analysis: climate | climate change | climate change | Snowball earth | Snowball earth | mesozoic | mesozoic | proterozoic | proterozoic | mass extinctions | mass extinctions | paleoclimate | paleoclimate | antiquity of life | antiquity of life | carbon dating | carbon dating | origin of life | origin of life | phylogenic trees | phylogenic trees

License

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT) 12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

The interactive Earth system: biology in geologic, environmental and climate change throughout Earth history. Since life began it has continually shaped and re-shaped the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. This course introduces the concept of 'life as a geological agent' and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared. The interactive Earth system: biology in geologic, environmental and climate change throughout Earth history. Since life began it has continually shaped and re-shaped the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. This course introduces the concept of 'life as a geological agent' and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared.

Subjects

interactive Earth system;biology | interactive Earth system;biology | geologic | geologic | environmental and climate change | environmental and climate change | atmosphere | atmosphere | hydrosphere | hydrosphere | cryosphere | cryosphere | solar system | solar system | evolution;global warming | evolution;global warming | global carbon cycle | global carbon cycle | Astrobiology. | Astrobiology. | evolution | evolution | global warming | global warming | Interactive earth system | Interactive earth system | biology | biology | geologic change | geologic change | environmental change | environmental change | climate change | climate change | Earth history | Earth history | life | life | solid earth | solid earth | geological agent | geological agent | astrobiology | astrobiology | biogeomorphology | biogeomorphology | long-term climate cycles | long-term climate cycles | mass extinctions | mass extinctions | biogeochemical tracers | biogeochemical tracers | origin of life | origin of life | antiquity | antiquity | habitable zone | habitable zone | deep biosphere | deep biosphere | geological time | geological time

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.134J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 21H.134J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course will survey the conditions of material life and changing social and economic conditions in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies. This course will survey the conditions of material life and changing social and economic conditions in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subjects

21H.134 | 21H.134 | 14.70 | 14.70 | medieval europe | medieval europe | economic history | economic history | the plague | the plague | mongols | mongols | antiquity | antiquity | vikings | vikings

License

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introduction to Art of the Ancient World

Description

Donna Kurtz and Sir John Boardman talk about Sir John's life, his career and experiences as a classical scholar and also the relationship works of art from different cultures around the ancient world have with one another. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

maya | aztec | antiquity | rome | china | greece | art | classics | archaeology | maya | aztec | antiquity | rome | china | greece | art | classics | archaeology

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Introduction to Art of the Ancient World

Description

Donna Kurtz and Sir John Boardman talk about Sir John's life, his career and experiences as a classical scholar and also the relationship works of art from different cultures around the ancient world have with one another.

Subjects

maya | aztec | antiquity | rome | china | greece | art | classics | archaeology | maya | aztec | antiquity | rome | china | greece | art | classics | archaeology

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The world of Orthodox sainthood The world of Orthodox sainthood

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. The enthusiasm for Valentine’s Day and Father Christmas is an example of the continuing legacy of the cult of saints in contemporary society. But who were the original St Valentine and St Nicholas? What can their lives tell us about the culture they lived in, and how were they venerated before the invention of chocolate hearts and the Christmas tree? This 10-credit module will introduce students to the cult of saints in the Eastern Orthodox world. Using original sources from late antiquity and the middle ages, we will examine the major types of saints and how they were venerated. The module will start with figures from the New Testament, and will move on to martyrs, monk This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. The enthusiasm for Valentine’s Day and Father Christmas is an example of the continuing legacy of the cult of saints in contemporary society. But who were the original St Valentine and St Nicholas? What can their lives tell us about the culture they lived in, and how were they venerated before the invention of chocolate hearts and the Christmas tree? This 10-credit module will introduce students to the cult of saints in the Eastern Orthodox world. Using original sources from late antiquity and the middle ages, we will examine the major types of saints and how they were venerated. The module will start with figures from the New Testament, and will move on to martyrs, monk

Subjects

UNow | UNow | saints in contemporary society | saints in contemporary society | ukoer | ukoer | St Valentine | St Valentine | St Nicholas | St Nicholas | cult of saints | cult of saints | Eastern Orthodox saints | Eastern Orthodox saints | late antiquity | late antiquity | New Testament | New Testament | Byzantium | Byzantium

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT) 12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the parallel evolution of life and the environment. Life processes are influenced by chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. In turn, life can influence chemical and physical processes on our planet. This course explores the concept of life as a geological agent and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared. This course introduces the parallel evolution of life and the environment. Life processes are influenced by chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. In turn, life can influence chemical and physical processes on our planet. This course explores the concept of life as a geological agent and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared.

Subjects

carbon cycle | carbon cycle | isotopic analysis | isotopic analysis | geobiochemistry | geobiochemistry | climate | climate | Snowball earth | Snowball earth | mesozoic | mesozoic | proterozoic | proterozoic | mass extinctions | mass extinctions | paleoclimate | paleoclimate | antiquity of life | antiquity of life | carbon dating | carbon dating | origin of life | origin of life | phylogenic trees | phylogenic trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT) 21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web. As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web.

Subjects

reading | reading | writing | writing | essay | essay | literary | literary | rhetorical | rhetorical | tradition | tradition | genre | genre | prose | prose | antiquity | antiquity | modern | modern | popular | popular | form | form | print | print | media | media | web | web | functions | functions | commentary | commentary | others | others | textual | textual | numerical | numerical | data | data | discovery | discovery | meaning | meaning | personal experience | personal experience | narration | narration | specialized | specialized | knowledge | knowledge | general | general | audience. | audience.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Library of Alexandria Library of Alexandria

Description

One of the most important questions for any student of the ancient world to address is 'how do we know what we know about antiquity?' Whether we're thinking about urban architecture, or love poetry, or modern drama, a wide range of factors shape the picture of antiquity that we have today. This free course, Library of Alexandria, encourages you to reflect upon and critically assess those factors. Interpreting an ancient text, or a piece of material culture, or understanding an historical event, is never a straightforward process of 'discovery', but is always affected by things such as translation choices, the preservation (or loss) of an archaeological record, or the agendas of scholars. First published on Mon, 11 Jan 2016 as Library of Alexandria. To find out more visit The Open Uni One of the most important questions for any student of the ancient world to address is 'how do we know what we know about antiquity?' Whether we're thinking about urban architecture, or love poetry, or modern drama, a wide range of factors shape the picture of antiquity that we have today. This free course, Library of Alexandria, encourages you to reflect upon and critically assess those factors. Interpreting an ancient text, or a piece of material culture, or understanding an historical event, is never a straightforward process of 'discovery', but is always affected by things such as translation choices, the preservation (or loss) of an archaeological record, or the agendas of scholars. First published on Mon, 11 Jan 2016 as Library of Alexandria. To find out more visit The Open Uni

Subjects

History & The Arts | History & The Arts | History | History | Classical Studies | Classical Studies | A863_1 | A863_1 | library | library | antiquity | antiquity | Alexandria | Alexandria

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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The body in antiquity The body in antiquity

Description

This free course, The body in antiquity, will introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation. In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and Classical Studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world around them. The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation. First published on Mon, 18 Jan 2016 as The body in antiquity. To find out This free course, The body in antiquity, will introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation. In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and Classical Studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world around them. The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation. First published on Mon, 18 Jan 2016 as The body in antiquity. To find out

Subjects

History & The Arts | History & The Arts | History | History | Classical Studies | Classical Studies | A864_1 | A864_1 | body | body | antiquity | antiquity | Culture | Culture | Greek | Greek | Roman | Roman | civilisation | civilisation

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT) 12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

This course introduces parallel evolution of life and the environment. Life processes are influenced by chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. In turn, life can influence chemical and physical processes on our planet. This course introduces the concept of life as a geological agent and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly four billion years since life first appeared. This course introduces parallel evolution of life and the environment. Life processes are influenced by chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. In turn, life can influence chemical and physical processes on our planet. This course introduces the concept of life as a geological agent and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly four billion years since life first appeared.

Subjects

carbon cycle | carbon cycle | isotopic analysis | isotopic analysis | geobiochemistry | geobiochemistry | climate | climate | climate change | climate change | Snowball earth | Snowball earth | mesozoic | mesozoic | proterozoic | proterozoic | mass extinctions | mass extinctions | paleoclimate | paleoclimate | antiquity of life | antiquity of life | carbon dating | carbon dating | origin of life | origin of life | phylogenic trees | phylogenic trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Love, Sex, and Marriage (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Love, Sex, and Marriage (MIT)

Description

It is easy to think of love as a "universal language" - but do ideas about love translate easily across history, culture, and identity? In this course, we will encounter some surprising, even disturbing ideas about love and sex from medieval writers and characters: For instance, that married people can never be in love, that the most satisfying romantic love incorporates pain and violence, and that intense erotic pleasure can be found in celibate service to God. Through Arthurian romances, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, love letters, mystical visions, and more, we will explore medieval attitudes toward marriage, sexuality, and gender roles. What can these perspectives teach us about the uniqueness of the Middle Ages—and how do medieval ideas about love continue to influence t It is easy to think of love as a "universal language" - but do ideas about love translate easily across history, culture, and identity? In this course, we will encounter some surprising, even disturbing ideas about love and sex from medieval writers and characters: For instance, that married people can never be in love, that the most satisfying romantic love incorporates pain and violence, and that intense erotic pleasure can be found in celibate service to God. Through Arthurian romances, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, love letters, mystical visions, and more, we will explore medieval attitudes toward marriage, sexuality, and gender roles. What can these perspectives teach us about the uniqueness of the Middle Ages—and how do medieval ideas about love continue to influence t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | literature | literature | late antiquity | late antiquity | society | society | history | history | love | love | sex | sex | marriage | marriage | romance | romance | religion | religion | Arthur | Arthur | Chaucer | Chaucer | Canterbury Tales | Canterbury Tales | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

This course introduces parallel evolution of life and the environment. Life processes are influenced by chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. In turn, life can influence chemical and physical processes on our planet. This course introduces the concept of life as a geological agent and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly four billion years since life first appeared.

Subjects

carbon cycle | isotopic analysis | geobiochemistry | climate | climate change | Snowball earth | mesozoic | proterozoic | mass extinctions | paleoclimate | antiquity of life | carbon dating | origin of life | phylogenic trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web.

Subjects

reading | writing | essay | literary | rhetorical | tradition | genre | prose | antiquity | modern | popular | form | print | media | web | functions | commentary | others | textual | numerical | data | discovery | meaning | personal experience | narration | specialized | knowledge | general | audience.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Literature | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | 15th | Culture | Society | Women | History | Roman empire | Religion | Literacy | Chivalry | Scholasticism | University | Education | Heretics | Nationalism | Class | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Art of Ancient Greece and Rome

Description

In this course, the student will study the art of Classical Antiquity. The different units of the course reflect the main chronological stages in art development in Ancient Greece and Rome, from the coming together of the Greek city-state and the emergence of “geometric art” (around 900 B.C.) to the fourth century A.D. shift that took place within Roman culture and art due to the growing influence of Christianity. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Art History 202)

Subjects

art history | greece | rome | art | antiquity | history | mythology | sculpture | painting | classical | acropolis | hellenistic | athens | etruscan | design | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Library of Alexandria

Description

One of the most important questions for any student of the ancient world to address is 'how do we know what we know about antiquity?' Whether we're thinking about urban architecture or love poetry or modern drama a wide range of factors shape the picture of antiquity that we have today. This free course encourages you to reflect upon and critically assess those factors. Interpreting an ancient text or a piece of material culture or understanding an historical event is never a straightforward process of 'discovery' but is always affected by things such as translation choices the preservation (or loss) of an archaeological record or the agendas of scholars.

Subjects

The Arts | History | Classical Studies | A863_1 | antiquity | Alexandria

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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Primerjava mest antika-srednji vek Comparing towns (antiquity - middle ages)

Description

Primerjava. Vaja spodbuja uporabo pisnih virov (učbenik DZS). Worksheet for comparing cities from two different eras (antiquity and middle ages).

Subjects

zgodovina | history | antika | antiquity | mesto | town | srednji vek | middle ages

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/

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The body in antiquity

Description

This free course will introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation. In recent years the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship and Classical Studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world around them. The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation.

Subjects

The Arts | History | Classical Studies | A864_1 | bodies | antiquity | Greek | Roman Empire | civilisation

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

This course introduces parallel evolution of life and the environment. Life processes are influenced by chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. In turn, life can influence chemical and physical processes on our planet. This course introduces the concept of life as a geological agent and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly four billion years since life first appeared.

Subjects

carbon cycle | isotopic analysis | geobiochemistry | climate | climate change | Snowball earth | mesozoic | proterozoic | mass extinctions | paleoclimate | antiquity of life | carbon dating | origin of life | phylogenic trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

The interactive Earth system: Biology in geologic, environmental and climate change throughout Earth history. Since life began it has continually shaped and re-shaped the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. Introduces the concept of "life as a geological agent" and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared. Topics include the origin of the solar system and the early Earth atmosphere; the origin and evolution of life and its influence on climate up through and including the modern age and the problem of global warming; the global carbon cycle; and astrobiology.

Subjects

Big Bang | carbon cycle | geobiochemistry | Solar System formation | evolution | isotopic analysis: climate | climate change | Snowball earth | mesozoic | proterozoic | mass extinctions | paleoclimate | antiquity of life | carbon dating | origin of life | phylogenic trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

The interactive Earth system: biology in geologic, environmental and climate change throughout Earth history. Since life began it has continually shaped and re-shaped the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. This course introduces the concept of 'life as a geological agent' and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared.

Subjects

interactive Earth system;biology | geologic | environmental and climate change | atmosphere | hydrosphere | cryosphere | solar system | evolution;global warming | global carbon cycle | Astrobiology. | evolution | global warming | Interactive earth system | biology | geologic change | environmental change | climate change | Earth history | life | solid earth | geological agent | astrobiology | biogeomorphology | long-term climate cycles | mass extinctions | biogeochemical tracers | origin of life | antiquity | habitable zone | deep biosphere | geological time

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.134J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course will survey the conditions of material life and changing social and economic conditions in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subjects

21H.134 | 14.70 | medieval europe | economic history | the plague | mongols | antiquity | vikings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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