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4.609 The Art Museum: History, Theory, Controversy (MIT) 4.609 The Art Museum: History, Theory, Controversy (MIT)

Description

Art museums are powerful and contested institutions. They are also innovative sites of architectural and artistic practice. From the exhibitionary complex of the nineteenth century to the experiential complex of today, this course investigates the art museum from historical and contemporary perspectives, striking a balance between theoretical investigation and case studies of recent exhibitions and museum buildings. Where and why did the concept of the public art museum emerge, and how have its functions changed over time? How do art museums continue to shape our definitions of what art is? How have they responded to recent critiques of the self-described 'universal' museum and to claims for the ethical display of ill-gotten artifacts or the restitution of such objects as Greek vases and Art museums are powerful and contested institutions. They are also innovative sites of architectural and artistic practice. From the exhibitionary complex of the nineteenth century to the experiential complex of today, this course investigates the art museum from historical and contemporary perspectives, striking a balance between theoretical investigation and case studies of recent exhibitions and museum buildings. Where and why did the concept of the public art museum emerge, and how have its functions changed over time? How do art museums continue to shape our definitions of what art is? How have they responded to recent critiques of the self-described 'universal' museum and to claims for the ethical display of ill-gotten artifacts or the restitution of such objects as Greek vases and

Subjects

art museum | art museum | art history | art history | museums | museums | repatriation | repatriation | history of architecture | history of architecture | gallery | gallery | cultural appropriation | cultural appropriation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT) 21G.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity? This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | global economy | labor market | labor market | colonization | colonization | empire | empire | trade | trade | world music | world music | cuisine | cuisine | sports | sports | sex work | sex work | podcasts | podcasts | Islamic Spain | Islamic Spain | architecture | architecture | Silk Road | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | cultural appropriation | exotification | exotification | authenticity | authenticity | immigration | immigration | assimilation | assimilation | anime | anime | capitalism | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.609 The Art Museum: History, Theory, Controversy (MIT)

Description

Art museums are powerful and contested institutions. They are also innovative sites of architectural and artistic practice. From the exhibitionary complex of the nineteenth century to the experiential complex of today, this course investigates the art museum from historical and contemporary perspectives, striking a balance between theoretical investigation and case studies of recent exhibitions and museum buildings. Where and why did the concept of the public art museum emerge, and how have its functions changed over time? How do art museums continue to shape our definitions of what art is? How have they responded to recent critiques of the self-described 'universal' museum and to claims for the ethical display of ill-gotten artifacts or the restitution of such objects as Greek vases and

Subjects

art museum | art history | museums | repatriation | history of architecture | gallery | cultural appropriation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | podcasts | Islamic Spain | architecture | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Cell Phones in Social Transformation in Africa: Insights from Ongoing Research in Some African Countries

Description

Authors:  Prof. Francis B. Nyamnjoh Cell phones have proved to be as accommodating as they are accommodated by those who embrace them. They shape their users as much as they are tamed by their users. Clicked 129 times. Last clicked 07/21/2014 - 14:21. Teaching & Learning Context:  For anyone interested in gaining a wider perspective on the situatedness of mobiles in African contexts, the social appropriation of technology and new configurations of marginality.

Subjects

Centre for Higher Education Development | Centre for Open Learning | Audio | Audio Lectures | English | Post-secondary | Africa | appropriation | cell phones | cellphones | Ethnography | Francis Nyamnjoh | marginality | media studies | mobile | mobile phones | Nyamnjoh | Social Anthropology | technology | Transformation

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.5/za/

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21L.020J Globalization: The Good, the Bad and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders. We will pay attention to the subtle interplay of history, geography, language and cultural norms that gave rise to specific ways of life. The materials for the course include fiction, nonfiction, audio pieces, maps and visual materials.

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | human trafficking | architecture | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism | ISIS | slavery | ebola | infectious diseases | NAFTA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | podcasts | Islamic Spain | architecture | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | podcasts | Islamic Spain | architecture | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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