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Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder resource stub

Description

A resource stub for Loyola University's Web page. This provides a brief introduction covering the main areas of ADHD - symptoms, diagnosis, causes.

Subjects

attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity | aetiology | epidemiology | diagnosis | prevention and control | drug therapy | therapy | attention deficit disorder | attention deficit hyperactivity disorder | adhd | Psychiatry and Psychology | SAFETY | Biological Sciences | UK EL04 = SCQF 4 | Foundational Level | NICAT 1 | CQFW 1 | Foundation | GCSE D-G | NVQ 1 | Intermediate 1 | | UK EL05 = SCQF 5 | Intermediate level | Intermediate | NICAT 2 | CQFW 2 | Intermediate | GSCE A-C | NVQ 2 | | Students | Learning | Teaching | Biological sciences | C000 | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | HEALTH CARE / MEDICINE / HEALTH and SAFETY | G | P

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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About : attention deficit disorder resource stub

Description

A resource stub about attention deficit disorder from the About.com. website. It explains the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.

Subjects

attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity | aetiology | diagnosis | epidemiology | prevention and control | drug therapy | therapy | attention deficit disorder | attention deficit hyperactivity disorder | adhd | Technology | Psychiatry and Psychology | SAFETY | Subjects allied to Medicine | UK EL04 = SCQF 4 | Foundational Level | NICAT 1 | CQFW 1 | Foundation | GCSE D-G | NVQ 1 | Intermediate 1 | | UK EL05 = SCQF 5 | Intermediate level | Intermediate | NICAT 2 | CQFW 2 | Intermediate | GSCE A-C | NVQ 2 | | Learning | Teaching | Students | Subjects allied to medicine | B000 | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | HEALTH CARE / MEDICINE / HEALTH and SAFETY | INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY and INFORMATION | G | P | C

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI papers, have a good grasp on what is known about high-level vision from fMRI, and design their own fMRI experiments. This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI papers, have a good grasp on what is known about high-level vision from fMRI, and design their own fMRI experiments.

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Her training as a knight had been unconventional

Description

Model posing for a Turners publicity shot, August 1958 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/4/1048/1). To read a blog about Turners advertising techniques see www.twmuseums.org.uk/engage/blog/turners-saved-my-marriage/. Tyne and Wear Archives presents a set of images taken by the Newcastle-based firm Turners (Photography) Ltd. They were taken by the firm on is own account for possible use in their advertising campaigns. Turners frequently hired models to help promote their work and to encourage sales in their shops. Some of the shots are humorous or bizarre while others are quite suggestive. The images are fascinating for what they tell us about the times that produced them ? the fashions, the attitudes, the technology ? Most of the images are quirky and almost seem to invite comments. If you?d like to suggest alternative captions we?d be delighted to hear them! (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email info@twarchives.org.uk.

Subjects

model | modelling | turnersphotography | newcastleupontyne | photography | publicity | toy | horse | 1950s | studio | fashion | colourphotography | dress | swimsuit | playsuit | hat | lampshade | colourphotograph | socialhistory | posing | turnerspublicityshot | august1958 | modellingforturners | woman | female | advertisingcampaigns | promotion | sales | retail | shops | suggestivepose | bizzare | interesting | unusual | trend | strap | eye | ear | industry | abstract | digitalimage | saddle | feet | shoe | pattern | square | leg | skin | lines | earings | lipstick | mouth | lip | makeup | eyelashes | hair | floor | ceiling | neutralbackground | light | shadow | spotlight | centreofattention | striking | attentiongetter | circle | seated | attentive | ring | silver | shine | finger | hand | arm | body

License

No known copyright restrictions

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9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT) 9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT)

Description

An introduction to human information processing and learning; topics include the nature of mental representation and processing; the architecture of memory; pattern recognition; attention; imagery and mental codes; concepts and prototypes; reasoning and problem solving. An introduction to human information processing and learning; topics include the nature of mental representation and processing; the architecture of memory; pattern recognition; attention; imagery and mental codes; concepts and prototypes; reasoning and problem solving.

Subjects

human | human | information processing | information processing | learning | learning | mental representation | mental representation | processing | processing | architecture of memory | architecture of memory | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | attention | attention | imagery | imagery | mental codes | mental codes | concepts | concepts | prototypes | prototypes | reasoning | reasoning | problem solving | problem solving

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT) 9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

Explores the relations between neural systems and cognition, emphasizing attention, vision, language, motor control, and memory. Introduces basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition. Discusses methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. Considers evidence from patients with neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke) and from normal human participants. An additional project is required for graduate credit. Alternate years. Explores the relations between neural systems and cognition, emphasizing attention, vision, language, motor control, and memory. Introduces basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition. Discusses methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. Considers evidence from patients with neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke) and from normal human participants. An additional project is required for graduate credit. Alternate years.

Subjects

emphasizing attention | emphasizing attention | vision | vision | language | language | motor control | motor control | memory | memory | functional imaging techniques | functional imaging techniques | cognition | cognition | neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease) | neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease) | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Huntington's disease | Huntington's disease | Balint's syndrome | Balint's syndrome | amnesia | amnesia | focal lesions from stroke | focal lesions from stroke

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | brain imaging | brain imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | attention | attention | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values, and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and in-class activities complemented by participation in small study groups and completion of homework assignments. This course examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values, and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and in-class activities complemented by participation in small study groups and completion of homework assignments.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | psychology | psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics | self-esteem | self-esteem | aggression | aggression | social behavior | social behavior | cognition | cognition | attention | attention | emotion | emotion | motivation | motivation | personality behavior | personality behavior | interpersonal relationships | interpersonal relationships | human activity | human activity | physiological | physiological | neurological | neurological

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory | voxelwise analysis | voxelwise analysis | conjugate mirroring | conjugate mirroring | interleaved stimulus presentation | interleaved stimulus presentation | magnetization following excitation | magnetization following excitation | active voxels | active voxels | scanner drift | scanner drift | trial sorting | trial sorting | collinear factors | collinear factors | different model factors | different model factors | mock scanner | mock scanner | scanner session | scanner session | visual stimulation task | visual stimulation task | hemoglobin signal | hemoglobin signal | labeling plane | labeling plane | nearby voxels | nearby voxels | shimming coils | shimming coils | bias field estimation | bias field estimation | conscious encoding | conscious encoding | spiral imaging | spiral imaging | functional resolution | functional resolution | hemodynamic activity | hemodynamic activity | direct cortical stimulation | direct cortical stimulation | physiological noise | physiological noise | refractory effects | refractory effects | independent statistical tests. | independent statistical tests.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT) 9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

This course explores the cognitive and neural processes that support attention, vision, language, motor control, navigation, and memory. It introduces basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition, and discusses methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. We consider evidence from patients with neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke) and from normal human participants. This course explores the cognitive and neural processes that support attention, vision, language, motor control, navigation, and memory. It introduces basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition, and discusses methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. We consider evidence from patients with neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke) and from normal human participants.

Subjects

emphasizing attention | emphasizing attention | vision | vision | language | language | motor control | motor control | memory | memory | functional imaging techniques | functional imaging techniques | cognition | cognition | neurological diseases | neurological diseases | Alzheimer's disease | Alzheimer's disease | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Huntington's disease | Huntington's disease | Balint's syndrome | Balint's syndrome | amnesia | amnesia | focal lesions | focal lesions | stroke | stroke

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.458 Parkinson's Disease Workshop (MIT) 9.458 Parkinson's Disease Workshop (MIT)

Description

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, degenerative disease of the brain that produces movement disorders and deficits in executive functions, working memory, visuospatial functions, and internal control of attention. It is named after James Parkinson (1755-1824), the English neurologist who described the first case. This six-week summer workshop explored different aspects of PD, including clinical characteristics, structural neuroimaging, neuropathology, genetics, and cognitive function (mental status, cognitive control processes, working memory, and long-term declarative memory).  The workshop did not take up the topics of motor control, nondeclarative memory, or treatment.  Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, degenerative disease of the brain that produces movement disorders and deficits in executive functions, working memory, visuospatial functions, and internal control of attention. It is named after James Parkinson (1755-1824), the English neurologist who described the first case. This six-week summer workshop explored different aspects of PD, including clinical characteristics, structural neuroimaging, neuropathology, genetics, and cognitive function (mental status, cognitive control processes, working memory, and long-term declarative memory).  The workshop did not take up the topics of motor control, nondeclarative memory, or treatment. 

Subjects

Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | chronic progressive degenerative disease | chronic progressive degenerative disease | central nervous system | central nervous system | movement disorders | movement disorders | executive functions | executive functions | working memory | working memory | visuospatial functions | visuospatial functions | internal control of attention | internal control of attention | James Parkinson | James Parkinson | neurologist | neurologist | pathogenic mechanisms | pathogenic mechanisms | positron emission tomography (PET) | positron emission tomography (PET) | structural and functional high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) | structural and functional high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.012 The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II (MIT) 9.012 The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II (MIT)

Description

This class is the second half of an intensive survey of cognitive science for first-year graduate students. Topics include visual perception, language, memory, cognitive architecture, learning, reasoning, decision-making, and cognitive development. Topics covered are from behavioral, computational, and neural perspectives. This class is the second half of an intensive survey of cognitive science for first-year graduate students. Topics include visual perception, language, memory, cognitive architecture, learning, reasoning, decision-making, and cognitive development. Topics covered are from behavioral, computational, and neural perspectives.

Subjects

brain | brain | behavioral | behavioral | perception | perception | attention | attention | working memory | working memory | recognition | recognition | recall | recall | language | language | cognitive science | cognitive science | computation | computation | visual perception | visual perception | memory | memory | cognitive architecture | cognitive architecture | learning | learning | reasoning | reasoning | decision-making | decision-making | cognitive development | cognitive development | behavioral perspective | behavioral perspective | computational perspective | computational perspective | neural perspective | neural perspective

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.459 Scene Understanding Symposium (MIT) 9.459 Scene Understanding Symposium (MIT)

Description

What are the circuits, mechanisms and representations that permit the recognition of a visual scene from just one glance? In this one-day seminar on Scene Understanding, speakers from a variety of disciplines - neurophysiology, cognitive neuroscience, visual cognition, computational neuroscience and computer vision - will address a range of topics related to scene recognition, including natural image categorization, contextual effects on object recognition, and the role of attention in scene understanding and visual art. The goal is to encourage exchanges between researchers of all fields of brain sciences in the burgeoning field of scene understanding. What are the circuits, mechanisms and representations that permit the recognition of a visual scene from just one glance? In this one-day seminar on Scene Understanding, speakers from a variety of disciplines - neurophysiology, cognitive neuroscience, visual cognition, computational neuroscience and computer vision - will address a range of topics related to scene recognition, including natural image categorization, contextual effects on object recognition, and the role of attention in scene understanding and visual art. The goal is to encourage exchanges between researchers of all fields of brain sciences in the burgeoning field of scene understanding.

Subjects

circuits | mechanisms and representation | circuits | mechanisms and representation | recognition of a visual scene | recognition of a visual scene | Scene Understanding | Scene Understanding | neurophysiology | neurophysiology | cognitive neuroscience | cognitive neuroscience | visual cognition | visual cognition | computational neuroscience | computational neuroscience | computer vision | computer vision | natural image categorization | natural image categorization | contextual effects on object recognition | contextual effects on object recognition | role of attention in scene understanding | role of attention in scene understanding

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT) 9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving. This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | cognitive processes | cognitive processes | cognition | cognition | the mind | the mind | object recognition | object recognition | attention | attention | memory | memory | associative memory | associative memory | learning | learning | implicit memory | implicit memory | conceptual short term memory | conceptual short term memory | working memory | working memory | language | language | concepts | concepts | prototypes | prototypes | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | visual knowledge | visual knowledge | mental codes | mental codes | judgement | judgement | reasoning | reasoning | problem-solving | problem-solving | conscious thought | conscious thought | unconscious thought | unconscious thought

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.012 The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II (MIT) 9.012 The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second half of the intensive survey of brain and behavioral studies for first-year graduate students in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences curriculum. Each module of this core course involves a series of overview lectures by leading researchers in the field. By offering a thorough introduction to the current state of the discipline while emphasizing critical thinking, the course aims to prepare students as cognitive scientists. Topics include: perception, attention, working memory, recognition and recall, language, and other issues in cognitive science. Topics are covered from the neural, behavioral and computational perspectives. This course is the second half of the intensive survey of brain and behavioral studies for first-year graduate students in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences curriculum. Each module of this core course involves a series of overview lectures by leading researchers in the field. By offering a thorough introduction to the current state of the discipline while emphasizing critical thinking, the course aims to prepare students as cognitive scientists. Topics include: perception, attention, working memory, recognition and recall, language, and other issues in cognitive science. Topics are covered from the neural, behavioral and computational perspectives.

Subjects

brain | brain | brain | | brain | | behavioral | | behavioral | | behavioral | behavioral | perception | perception | attention | attention | working memory | working memory | recognition | recognition | recall | recall | language | language | cognitive science | cognitive science | computation | computation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

Fundamental questions about the human brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of fMRI. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information (including object recognition, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, visual memory, and other topics). Students will read, present to the class, and critique current neuroimaging articles, as well as write detailed proposals for experiments of their own.This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI Fundamental questions about the human brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of fMRI. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information (including object recognition, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, visual memory, and other topics). Students will read, present to the class, and critique current neuroimaging articles, as well as write detailed proposals for experiments of their own.This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

Our conjoint participation in the 9.70 learning system places us in a consensually-shared social situation. (All of the foregoing words are important. Do you understand their meaning in this context?) We will endeavor to organize ourselves into a community of discourse that approximates (albeit in an altogether partial way) a meaningful, real-world research enterprise: Like all scientific communities, we will work with limited resources. Unlike "real" scientific communities, ours will operate under the constraint of predetermined project duration and contractually agreed-upon limits in the amount of time and effort to be contributed to it by the individual participants. Toward this end, we randomly divide the membership of the class – at the outset — into subsystems – s Our conjoint participation in the 9.70 learning system places us in a consensually-shared social situation. (All of the foregoing words are important. Do you understand their meaning in this context?) We will endeavor to organize ourselves into a community of discourse that approximates (albeit in an altogether partial way) a meaningful, real-world research enterprise: Like all scientific communities, we will work with limited resources. Unlike "real" scientific communities, ours will operate under the constraint of predetermined project duration and contractually agreed-upon limits in the amount of time and effort to be contributed to it by the individual participants. Toward this end, we randomly divide the membership of the class – at the outset — into subsystems – s

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | Psychology | Psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics | self-esteem | self-esteem | aggression | aggression | complex social creatures | complex social creatures | mental functions | mental functions | behavior | behavior | symbolic interpretation | symbolic interpretation | critical analysis | critical analysis | social sciences | social sciences | sociology | sociology | perception | perception | cognition | cognition | attention | attention | emotion | emotion | motivation | motivation | personality behavior | personality behavior | interpersonal relationships | interpersonal relationships | human activity | human activity | physiological | physiological | neurological | neurological | human development | human development | natural sciences | natural sciences | humanities | humanities | psychologist. | psychologist.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.00SC Introduction to Psychology (MIT) 9.00SC Introduction to Psychology (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is a survey of the scientific study of human nature, including how the mind works, and how the brain supports the mind. Topics include the mental and neural bases of perception, emotion, learning, memory, cognition, child development, personality, psychopathology, and social interaction. Students will consider how such knowledge relates to debates about nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self, and society. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is a survey of the scientific study of human nature, including how the mind works, and how the brain supports the mind. Topics include the mental and neural bases of perception, emotion, learning, memory, cognition, child development, personality, psychopathology, and social interaction. Students will consider how such knowledge relates to debates about nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self, and society.

Subjects

psychology | psychology | brain | brain | vision | vision | attention | attention | consciousness | consciousness | learning | learning | memory | memory | language | language | thinking | thinking | intelligence | intelligence | emotion | emotion | personality | personality | human development | human development | stress | stress | psychopathology | psychopathology | social psychology | social psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.400 Human Factors Engineering (MIT) 16.400 Human Factors Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to provide both undergraduate and graduate students with a fundamental understanding of human factors that must be taken into account in the design and engineering of complex aviation and space systems. The primary focus is the derivation of human engineering design criteria from sensory, motor, and cognitive sources to include principles of displays, controls and ergonomics, manual control, the nature of human error, basic experimental design, and human-computer interaction in supervisory control settings. Undergraduate students will demonstrate proficiency through aviation accident case presentations, quizzes, homework assignments, and hands-on projects. Graduate students will complete all the undergraduate assignments; however, they are expected to complete a res This course is designed to provide both undergraduate and graduate students with a fundamental understanding of human factors that must be taken into account in the design and engineering of complex aviation and space systems. The primary focus is the derivation of human engineering design criteria from sensory, motor, and cognitive sources to include principles of displays, controls and ergonomics, manual control, the nature of human error, basic experimental design, and human-computer interaction in supervisory control settings. Undergraduate students will demonstrate proficiency through aviation accident case presentations, quizzes, homework assignments, and hands-on projects. Graduate students will complete all the undergraduate assignments; however, they are expected to complete a res

Subjects

human factors | human factors | attention and workload | attention and workload | manual control | manual control | automation | automation | decision making | decision making | situational awareness | situational awareness | anthropometry | anthropometry | environmental ergonomics | environmental ergonomics | space physiology | space physiology | research methods | research methods | space bioastronautics | space bioastronautics | fatigue | fatigue | Circadian rhythms | Circadian rhythms | response selection | response selection | control of movement | control of movement

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT) 9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

Course topics explore the relations between neural systems and cognition, emphasizing attention, vision, language, motor control, and memory. An introduction to basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition is given with discussion of methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. Evidence from patients with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke is given as well as from normal human participants. Course topics explore the relations between neural systems and cognition, emphasizing attention, vision, language, motor control, and memory. An introduction to basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition is given with discussion of methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. Evidence from patients with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke is given as well as from normal human participants.

Subjects

emphasizing attention | emphasizing attention | vision | vision | language | language | motor control | motor control | memory | memory | functional imaging techniques | functional imaging techniques | cognition | cognition | neurological diseases | neurological diseases | Alzheimer's disease | Alzheimer's disease | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Huntington's disease | Huntington's disease | Balint's syndrome | Balint's syndrome | amnesia | amnesia | focal lesions | focal lesions | stroke | stroke

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.458 Parkinson's Disease Workshop (MIT)

Description

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, degenerative disease of the brain that produces movement disorders and deficits in executive functions, working memory, visuospatial functions, and internal control of attention. It is named after James Parkinson (1755-1824), the English neurologist who described the first case. This six-week summer workshop explored different aspects of PD, including clinical characteristics, structural neuroimaging, neuropathology, genetics, and cognitive function (mental status, cognitive control processes, working memory, and long-term declarative memory).  The workshop did not take up the topics of motor control, nondeclarative memory, or treatment. 

Subjects

Parkinson's disease | chronic progressive degenerative disease | central nervous system | movement disorders | executive functions | working memory | visuospatial functions | internal control of attention | James Parkinson | neurologist | pathogenic mechanisms | positron emission tomography (PET) | structural and functional high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.012 The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II (MIT)

Description

This class is the second half of an intensive survey of cognitive science for first-year graduate students. Topics include visual perception, language, memory, cognitive architecture, learning, reasoning, decision-making, and cognitive development. Topics covered are from behavioral, computational, and neural perspectives.

Subjects

brain | behavioral | perception | attention | working memory | recognition | recall | language | cognitive science | computation | visual perception | memory | cognitive architecture | learning | reasoning | decision-making | cognitive development | behavioral perspective | computational perspective | neural perspective

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

Fundamental questions about the human brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of fMRI. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information (including object recognition, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, visual memory, and other topics). Students will read, present to the class, and critique current neuroimaging articles, as well as write detailed proposals for experiments of their own.This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | human | brain | noninvasive | resolution | high-level vision | object recognition | visual attention | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visual memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Born to be Wild

Description

Model posing an a motor scooter, May 1963 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/4/AG2437C). To read a blog about Turners advertising techniques see www.twmuseums.org.uk/engage/blog/turners-saved-my-marriage/. Tyne and Wear Archives presents a set of images taken by the Newcastle-based firm Turners (Photography) Ltd. They were taken by the firm on is own account for possible use in their advertising campaigns. Turners frequently hired models to help promote their work and to encourage sales in their shops. Some of the shots are humorous or bizarre while others are quite suggestive. The images are fascinating for what they tell us about the times that produced them ? the fashions, the attitudes, the technology ? Most of the images are quirky and almost seem to invite comments. If you?d like to suggest alternative captions we?d be delighted to hear them! (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email info@twarchives.org.uk.

Subjects

model | modelling | turnersphotography | newcastleupontyne | photography | publicity | 1960s | studio | motorscooter | fashion | colourphotograph | socialhistory | industry | woman | modellingforturners | neutralbackground | posing | may1963 | wheel | stand | shine | seat | plate | light | metal | handle | tyre | trousers | blouse | leg | arm | feet | hand | shoe | smile | lipstick | hair | makeup | ear | nose | mouth | eye | top | stripes | crease | limelight | attention | newcastle | turnersphotographyltd | advertising | campaign | product | sales | promotion | consumerism | retail | photographicstudio | portrait | shoulder | chest | slim | brandname | enticing | floor | wall | shadow | artificiallight

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Activities to develop attention span and memory when planning for an early years setting

Description

Word document that allows you to give examples of various types of activities when planning for an early years setting.

Subjects

.doc | word | early years | attention span | memory | activity | HEALTH CARE / MEDICINE / HEALTH and SAFETY | P

License

Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/

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