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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT) 15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms. This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | interpersonal communication | business presentations | business presentations | communication strategies | communication strategies | teamwork | teamwork | running meetings | running meetings | managerial communication | managerial communication | business writing | business writing | business speaking | business speaking | group decision making | group decision making | hostile audience | hostile audience | role play exercises | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | persuading audiences | listening | listening | nonverbal communication | nonverbal communication | A | A | question and answer | question and answer | working with media | working with media | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT) 15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in (15.279) Management Communication for Undergraduates or (15.280) Communication for Managers. It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms. This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in (15.279) Management Communication for Undergraduates or (15.280) Communication for Managers. It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | interpersonal communication | business presentations | business presentations | communication strategies | communication strategies | teamwork | teamwork | running meetings | running meetings | managerial communication | managerial communication | business writing | business writing | business speaking | business speaking | group decision making | group decision making | hostile audience | hostile audience | role play exercises | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | persuading audiences | listening | listening | nonverbal communication | nonverbal communication | A | A | question and answer | question and answer | working with media | working with media | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT) 15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in (15.279) Management Communication for Undergraduates or (15.280) Communication for Managers. It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms. This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in (15.279) Management Communication for Undergraduates or (15.280) Communication for Managers. It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | interpersonal communication | business presentations | business presentations | communication strategies | communication strategies | teamwork | teamwork | running meetings | running meetings | managerial communication | managerial communication | business writing | business writing | business speaking | business speaking | group decision making | group decision making | hostile audience | hostile audience | role play exercises | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | persuading audiences | listening | listening | nonverbal communication | nonverbal communication | A | A | question and answer | question and answer | working with media | working with media | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances. Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater. | theater.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.067J Cultural Performances of Asia (MIT) 21G.067J Cultural Performances of Asia (MIT)

Description

This course examines cultural performances of Asia, including both traditional and contemporary forms, in a variety of genres. Students will explore the communicative power of performances with attention to the ways performers, media, cultural settings, and audiences interact. The representation of cultural difference is considered and how it is altered through processes of globalization. Performances are viewed live when possible, but the course also relies on video, audio, and online materials as necessary. There are no prerequisites for this course and it is taught in English. This course examines cultural performances of Asia, including both traditional and contemporary forms, in a variety of genres. Students will explore the communicative power of performances with attention to the ways performers, media, cultural settings, and audiences interact. The representation of cultural difference is considered and how it is altered through processes of globalization. Performances are viewed live when possible, but the course also relies on video, audio, and online materials as necessary. There are no prerequisites for this course and it is taught in English.

Subjects

21G.067 | 21G.067 | WGS.608 | WGS.608 | Cultural performances | Cultural performances | Asia | Asia | traditional | traditional | contemporary | contemporary | genres | genres | performers | performers | media | media | cultural settings | cultural settings | audiences | audiences | globalization | globalization | live | live | video | video | audio | audio | online | online | English | English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Study of Media Audiences

Description

The aim of this one semester course is to provide an introductory guide to important theoretical and methodological concerns that have influenced audience studies alongside some of the seminal work on the persuasive power of media

Subjects

ukoer | media | audiences | persuasion | leicester university | otter | documentation | P000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Study of Media Audiences

Description

The aim of this one semester course is to provide an introductory guide to important theoretical and methodological concerns that have influenced audience studies alongside some of the seminal work on the persuasive power of media.

Subjects

ukoer media audiences media audience studies audience power of media | documentation | P000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Key Issues and Approaches to Media Studies Mod 1 Unit 2

Description

This unit looks at the relationship between media research and social science, focusing in particular on the early days of media research in the U.K. and in the U.S.A.

Subjects

ukoer media audiences media audience studies audience power of media media studies research media research | documentation | P000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Key Issues and Approaches to Media Studies Mod 1 Unit 6

Description

This unit explores one of the younger traditions in mass communication research which is sometimes called the New Audience Research.

Subjects

ukoer media audiences media audience studies audience power of media media studies research media research theories of society | documentation | P000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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15.280 Communication for Managers (MIT)

Description

In this course, students develop and polish communication strategies and methods through discussion, examples, and practice with an emphasizes on writing and speaking skills necessary for effective leaders. The course includes several oral and written assignments which are integrated with other subjects, and with career development activities, when possible. This course is part of the MBA core and is restricted to first-year Sloan graduate students. Find out more about the Sloan MBA core on OCW.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | business presentations | communication strategies | teamwork | running meetings | managerial communication | business writing | business speaking | group decision making | hostile audience | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | listening | nonverbal communication | A | question and answer | working with media | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in (15.279) Management Communication for Undergraduates or (15.280) Communication for Managers. It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | business presentations | communication strategies | teamwork | running meetings | managerial communication | business writing | business speaking | group decision making | hostile audience | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | listening | nonverbal communication | A | question and answer | working with media | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | forbidden plays | Modern America | decision alley | drama strategies | drama skills | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activities | writing opportunity | last wolf | learning medium | literacy activities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | assessment focus | two long lines | dramatic activity | action conventions | literary arts | storytelling | poetry | live performance | ritual | entertainment | communities | social norms | audiences | plays | dramatic structure | performing arts | writing | discussion | writer | speaker | cultures | tools | fiction | ethical | historical | political | artistic | questions | creativity | self-awareness | communicate | theater | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | many theatre artists | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre | censorship | blacklist | banned | obscenity | architecture | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.281 Advanced Communication for Leaders (MIT)

Description

This course introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills critical to leaders, including strategies for presenting to a hostile audience, running effective and productive meetings, active listening, and contributing to group decision-making. There are team-run classes on chosen communication topics, and an individual analysis of leadership qualities and characteristics. Students deliver an oral presentation and an executive summary, both aimed at a business audience.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | business presentations | communication strategies | teamwork | running meetings | managerial communication | business writing | business speaking | group decision making | hostile audience | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | listening | nonverbal communication | A | question and answer | working with media | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances.

Subjects

Drama | literary arts | storytelling | poetry | live performance | ritual | entertainment | communities | social norms | audiences | plays | dramatic structure | performing arts | writing | discussion | writer | speaker | cultures | tools | fiction | ethical | historical | political | artistic | questions | creativity | self-awareness | communicate | theater.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.067J Cultural Performances of Asia (MIT)

Description

This course examines cultural performances of Asia, including both traditional and contemporary forms, in a variety of genres. Students will explore the communicative power of performances with attention to the ways performers, media, cultural settings, and audiences interact. The representation of cultural difference is considered and how it is altered through processes of globalization. Performances are viewed live when possible, but the course also relies on video, audio, and online materials as necessary. There are no prerequisites for this course and it is taught in English.

Subjects

21G.067 | WGS.608 | Cultural performances | Asia | traditional | contemporary | genres | performers | media | cultural settings | audiences | globalization | live | video | audio | online | English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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at Gobowen

Description

Subjects

costumes | wales | children | actors | cymru | actresses | audiences | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | nationallibraryofwales | sociallife | stageprops | filmnegatives | theatricalproductions | dramaclubs | stagesplatforms | charlesgeoff19092002 | negyddffilm | performancesportrayals

License

No known copyright restrictions

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at Gobowen

Description

Subjects

costumes | wales | children | actors | cymru | actresses | audiences | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | nationallibraryofwales | sociallife | stageprops | filmnegatives | theatricalproductions | dramaclubs | stagesplatforms | charlesgeoff19092002 | negyddffilm | performancesportrayals

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Mini project : personal multimedia portfolio : presentation transcript

Description

The project requires students to apply the System Development Life Cycle methodology to design and implement their personal multimedia portfolios for specific target audiences, with proper use of different media elements including image, sound and animation.

Subjects

electronics | uniofhertsoer | personal multimedia portfolio | oer | university of hertfordshire | communications | video | ukoer | multimedia | user requirements | audio and video content | audio | system development life cycle | engineering | multimedia technology | 2ele0075 | media | developing applications | engsc | bsc | mini project | sdlc | engscoer | navigation | school of electronic communications and electrical | target audiences | storyboards | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Ringling clown Emmett Kelly holding cabbage - Sarasota

Description

Subjects

costumes | florida | entertainment | cabbage | sarasota | clowns | crowds | amusements | circusperformers | audiences | circuses | emmettkelly

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | business presentations | communication strategies | teamwork | running meetings | managerial communication | business writing | business speaking | group decision making | hostile audience | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | listening | nonverbal communication | A | question and answer | working with media | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.067J Cultural Performances of Asia (MIT)

Description

This course examines cultural performances of Asia, including both traditional and contemporary forms, in a variety of genres. Students will explore the communicative power of performances with attention to the ways performers, media, cultural settings, and audiences interact. The representation of cultural difference is considered and how it is altered through processes of globalization. Performances are viewed live when possible, but the course also relies on video, audio, and online materials as necessary. There are no prerequisites for this course and it is taught in English.

Subjects

Cultural performances | Asia | traditional | contemporary | genres | performers | media | cultural settings | audiences | globalization | live | video | audio | online | English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.067J Cultural Performances of Asia (MIT)

Description

This course examines cultural performances of Asia, including both traditional and contemporary forms, in a variety of genres. Students will explore the communicative power of performances with attention to the ways performers, media, cultural settings, and audiences interact. The representation of cultural difference is considered and how it is altered through processes of globalization. Performances are viewed live when possible, but the course also relies on video, audio, and online materials as necessary. There are no prerequisites for this course and it is taught in English.

Subjects

Cultural performances | Asia | traditional | contemporary | genres | performers | media | cultural settings | audiences | globalization | live | video | audio | online | English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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