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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT) 6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment. 6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | network | computer security | computer security | security | security | cryptography | cryptography | secret-key | secret-key | public-key | public-key | digital signature | digital signature | authentication | authentication | identification | identification | intrusion detection | intrusion detection | virus | virus | operating system | operating system | software | software | protection | protection | electronic mail | electronic mail | email | email | electronic commerce | electronic commerce | electronic cash | electronic cash | firewall | firewall | computer | computer | digital | digital | signature | signature | electronic | electronic | cash | cash | commerce | commerce | mail | mail | operating | operating | system | system | intrustion | intrustion | detection | detection | distributed | distributed | physical | physical | discretionary | discretionary | mandatory | mandatory | access | access | control | control | biometrics | biometrics | information | information | flow | flow | models | models | covert | covert | channels | channels | integrity | integrity | logic | logic | voting | voting | risk | risk | assessment | assessment | secure | secure | web | web | browsers | browsers | architecture | architecture | engineering | engineering | certificates | certificates | multi-user computer systems | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | physical security | discretionary access control | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | information-flow models | covert channels | covert channels | integrity models | integrity models | elementary cryptography | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | viruses | firewalls | firewalls | electronic voting | electronic voting | risk assessment | risk assessment | secure web browsers | secure web browsers | network security | network security | architecture engineering | architecture engineering | digital signatures | digital signatures | authentication schemes | authentication schemes | identification schemes | identification schemes | formal models | formal models | secure operating systems | secure operating systems | software protection | software protection | electronic mail security | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | World Wide Web | ecommerce | ecommerce | email security | email security | www | www | payment protocols | payment protocols | authentication logic | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.033 Computer System Engineering (MIT) 6.033 Computer System Engineering (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers topics on the engineering of computer software and hardware systems: techniques for controlling complexity; strong modularity using client-server design, virtual memory, and threads; networks; atomicity and coordination of parallel activities; recovery and reliability; privacy, security, and encryption; and impact of computer systems on society. Case studies of working systems and readings from the current literature provide comparisons and contrasts. Two design projects are required, and students engage in extensive written communication exercises. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers topics on the engineering of computer software and hardware systems: techniques for controlling complexity; strong modularity using client-server design, virtual memory, and threads; networks; atomicity and coordination of parallel activities; recovery and reliability; privacy, security, and encryption; and impact of computer systems on society. Case studies of working systems and readings from the current literature provide comparisons and contrasts. Two design projects are required, and students engage in extensive written communication exercises.

Subjects

computer systems | computer systems | systems design | systems design | complexity | complexity | abstractions | abstractions | modularity | modularity | client server | client server | operating system | operating system | performance | performance | networks | networks | layering | layering | routing | routing | congestion control | congestion control | reliability | reliability | atomicity | atomicity | isolation | isolation | security | security | authentication | authentication | cryptography | cryptography | therac 25 | therac 25 | unix | unix | mapreduce | mapreduce | architecture of complexity | architecture of complexity | trusting trust | trusting trust | computer system design | computer system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed. This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | breaking | breaking | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | African-American | African-American | world music | world music | DJ | DJ | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | misogyny | misogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | racism | racism | turntablism | turntablism | gangsta | gangsta | gangster | gangster | beats | beats | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | popular culture | popular culture | urban | urban | authenticity | authenticity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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St Cross Seminar: Neither God nor Nature. Could the doping sinner be an exemplar of human(ist) dignity?

Description

If doping were done in a healthy and fair way, would it be OK? If so, all wrongs would lie in doping abuses involving health risks, deceit and unfairness. I argue that perhaps the doping sinner best exemplifies human dignity and existential authenticity. If doping would be done in a sufficiently healthy, candid, autonomous, wise and fair way, would doping be OK? If so, all wrongs would lie in doping abuses, namely when done with too much health risks, deceit, coercion, fecklessness and unfairness. I will briefly advocate this important point - already made by many others - only to proceed to the further argument that under certain circumstances, perhaps nobody can exemplify human(ist) dignity and existential(ist) authenticity better than that modern witch, the doping sinner. From a humani Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human enhancement | doping | authenticity | human enhancement | doping | authenticity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT) 6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 Network and Computer Security is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. 6.857 Network and Computer Security is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration.

Subjects

network | network | computer security | computer security | security | security | cryptography | cryptography | secret-key | secret-key | public-key | public-key | digital signature | digital signature | authentication | authentication | Bitcoin | Bitcoin | encryption | encryption | block ciphers | block ciphers | cryptographic hash functions | cryptographic hash functions | one-time pad | one-time pad | stream ciphers | stream ciphers | web browser security | web browser security | biometrics | biometrics | Viruses | Viruses | electronic voting | electronic voting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.501J Art, Craft, Science (MIT) 21A.501J Art, Craft, Science (MIT)

Description

This course examines how people learn, practice, and evaluate traditional and contemporary craft techniques. Social science theories of design, embodiment, apprenticeship learning, skill, labor, expertise, and tacit knowledge are used to explore distinctions and connections among art, craft, and science. We will also discuss the commoditization of craft into market goods, collectible art, and tourism industries. Ethnographic and historical case studies include textiles, glassblowing, quilting, cheese making, industrial design, home cooking, factory and laboratory work, CAD-CAM. In-class demonstrations and hands-on craft projects will be included. This course examines how people learn, practice, and evaluate traditional and contemporary craft techniques. Social science theories of design, embodiment, apprenticeship learning, skill, labor, expertise, and tacit knowledge are used to explore distinctions and connections among art, craft, and science. We will also discuss the commoditization of craft into market goods, collectible art, and tourism industries. Ethnographic and historical case studies include textiles, glassblowing, quilting, cheese making, industrial design, home cooking, factory and laboratory work, CAD-CAM. In-class demonstrations and hands-on craft projects will be included.

Subjects

21A.501 | 21A.501 | STS.074 | STS.074 | craft | craft | technique | technique | design | design | apprenticeship | apprenticeship | learning | learning | skill | skill | labor | labor | expertise | expertise | tacit knowledge | tacit knowledge | art | art | science | science | market goods | market goods | tourism industry | tourism industry | textiles | textiles | glassblowing | glassblowing | quilting | quilting | cheesemaking | cheesemaking | industrial design | industrial design | home cooking | home cooking | technology | technology | artisan | artisan | technician | technician | machine | machine | knitting | knitting | glass | glass | modernism | modernism | tools | tools | embodied practice | embodied practice | value | value | global economy | global economy | design politics | design politics | craft politics | craft politics | collecting | collecting | display | display | authenticity | authenticity | craftivism | craftivism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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DG0D36 Network Design: Directory Services and Network Infrastructure

Description

This unit is designed to introduce candidates to the issues involved in designing directory services and network infrastructure. It is intended for candidates undertaking an HNC or HND in computing or a related area who require a detailed knowledge of directory services and network infrastructure. 1. Create the conceptual design by gathering and analysing business and technical requirements. 2. Create the logical design for a directory services infrastructure. 3. Create the logical design for a network services infrastructure. 4. Create the physical design for a directory services and network infrastructure.

Subjects

DNS | DG0D 36 | network topology | computer authentication strategy | user authentication strategy | IP address assignment strategy | SCQF Level 9

License

Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Scottish Qualification Authority (SQA), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG) and SQA, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Scottish Qualification Authority (SQA), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG) and SQA, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. DG0D 36 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17761/LicenceSQAMaterialsCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17761/LicenceSQAMaterialsCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 SQA SQA

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21G.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT) 21G.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity? This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | global economy | labor market | labor market | colonization | colonization | empire | empire | trade | trade | world music | world music | cuisine | cuisine | sports | sports | sex work | sex work | podcasts | podcasts | Islamic Spain | Islamic Spain | architecture | architecture | Silk Road | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | cultural appropriation | exotification | exotification | authenticity | authenticity | immigration | immigration | assimilation | assimilation | anime | anime | capitalism | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.114 Chinese VI (Streamlined) (MIT) 21G.114 Chinese VI (Streamlined) (MIT)

Description

This course is a sequel to 21G.113 Chinese V (Streamlined). It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining authentic reading and audio-visual material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT, in the Boston area and on the web. Some special features of Chinese societies, cultures and customs will be introduced. The class consists of readings, discussion, student presentations and network exploration. The course is conducted in Mandarin. This course is a sequel to 21G.113 Chinese V (Streamlined). It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining authentic reading and audio-visual material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT, in the Boston area and on the web. Some special features of Chinese societies, cultures and customs will be introduced. The class consists of readings, discussion, student presentations and network exploration. The course is conducted in Mandarin.

Subjects

Chinese | Chinese | Streamlined | Streamlined | sophisticated | sophisticated | conversational | conversational | reading | reading | writing | writing | skills | skills | authentic reading | authentic reading | audio-visual | audio-visual | explorations | explorations | Chinese speaking societies | Chinese speaking societies | human | human | literary | literary | electronic resources | electronic resources | societies | societies | cultures | cultures | customs | customs | introduced | introduced | readings | readings | discussion | discussion | student presentations | student presentations | network exploration | network exploration | Mandarin | Mandarin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | podcasts | Islamic Spain | architecture | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.114 Chinese VI (Streamlined) (MIT)

Description

This course is a sequel to 21F.113 Chinese V (Streamlined). It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining authentic reading and audio-visual material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT, in the Boston area and on the web. Some special features of Chinese societies, cultures and customs will be introduced. The class consists of readings, discussion, student presentations and network exploration. The course is conducted in Mandarin.

Subjects

Chinese | Streamlined | sophisticated | conversational | reading | writing | skills | authentic reading | audio-visual | explorations | Chinese speaking societies | human | literary | electronic resources | societies | cultures | customs | introduced | readings | discussion | student presentations | network exploration | Mandarin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | podcasts | Islamic Spain | architecture | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.114 Chinese VI (Streamlined) (MIT)

Description

This course is a sequel to 21F.113 Chinese V (Streamlined). It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining authentic reading and audio-visual material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT, in the Boston area and on the web. Some special features of Chinese societies, cultures and customs will be introduced. The class consists of readings, discussion, student presentations and network exploration. The course is conducted in Mandarin.

Subjects

Chinese | Streamlined | sophisticated | conversational | reading | writing | skills | authentic reading | audio-visual | explorations | Chinese speaking societies | human | literary | electronic resources | societies | cultures | customs | introduced | readings | discussion | student presentations | network exploration | Mandarin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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H.M.S Victoria

Description

This is a Glass Slide of the H.M.S Victoria in Dock. The H.M.S Victoria was an iconic Battleship named in honour of Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1888. The slide is from the late 19th century. It was taken by the Tynemouth Photographer M. Auty. The slide would have been viewed through a Magic Lantern, an early type of image projector. This image is part of the Tyne & Wear archives & museums set South Shields Art Gallery Social History collection. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email adam.bell@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

dock | hmsvictoria | battleship | glass | slide | honour | queenvictoria | goldenjubilee | 1888 | tynemouthphotographermauty | view | magiclantern | earlytype | imageprojector | horseandcart | humanity | people | steam | smoke | water | maritime | heritage | boats | ships | gathering | crowds | blackandwhite | authentic | stark | shoes | socks | suit | hats | dress | women | men | flag | bridge | anchor | standing | observing | road | path | frame | supports | smog | appearances

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums | FlickR

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Promoting mental health and wellbeing of older carers

Description

E-learning package containing interactive resources to aid awareness of mental health needs of older carers. The resource is structured around three stories about the experience of older carers to trigger reflective learning. It also contains three editions of an e-magazine to support development of reflective skills. Users can access a downloadable reflective log book to track learning and future development needs. Each story will enable thinking about how the unique demands of being a carer in later life impacts on people's well-being. Using this resource allows consideration of how to address the needs of older carers when designing and planning health promotion activities for older people in general. Each story is divided into sections or parts that address focused questions. The ques

Subjects

ukoer | phorus | public health | older carers | mental health and wellbeing | authentic stories | e-learning | interprofessional education | health sciences and practice | Subjects allied to medicine | B000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Cryptography

Description

This course introduces cryptography by addressing topics such as ciphers that were used before World War II, block cipher algorithms, the advanced encryption standard for a symmetric-key encryption adopted by the U.S. government, MD5 and SHA-1 hash functions, and the message authentication code. The course will focus on public key cryptography (as exemplified by the RSA algorithm), elliptic curves, the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, and the elliptic curve discrete logarithm problem. The course concludes with key exchange methods, study signature schemes, and discussion of public key infrastructure. Note: It is strongly recommended that the student complete an abstract algebra course (such as the Saylor Foundation’s MA231) before taking this course. This free course may be completed onli

Subjects

computer science | cryptanalysis | ciphers | code | encryption | hash functions | rsa | public key cryptography | elliptic curve | authentication | key exchange | Computer science | I100

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Cryptography

Description

This course introduces cryptography by addressing topics such as ciphers that were used before World War II, block cipher algorithms, the advanced encryption standard for a symmetric-key encryption adopted by the U.S. government, MD5 and SHA-1 hash functions, and the message authentication code. The course will focus on public key cryptography (as exemplified by the RSA algorithm), elliptic curves, the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, and the elliptic curve discrete logarithm problem. The course concludes with key exchange methods, study signature schemes, and discussion of public key infrastructure. Note: It is strongly recommended that the student complete an abstract algebra course (such as the Saylor Foundation’s MA231) before taking this course. This free course may be completed onli

Subjects

computer science | cryptanalysis | ciphers | code | encryption | hash functions | rsa | public key cryptography | elliptic curve | authentication | key exchange | Computer science | I100

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Authentication

Description

An introduction to authentication - what it is, and some of the systems that different organisations use.

Subjects

FESkills | Discover Jisc | authentication | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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InFlow (Information Flow): An integrated model of applied information literacy

Description

An information literacy model developed from the EU-funded iTEC project, which is designed to be engaging for students and to support student-centred and individualised learning. It is focussed on authentic learning experiences and the production of creative, tangible outputs. The model can be used by different age ranges and collaboration is an important component.

Subjects

information literacy; authentic learning; student-centred; creativity

License

Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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21A.501J Art, Craft, Science (MIT)

Description

This course examines how people learn, practice, and evaluate traditional and contemporary craft techniques. Social science theories of design, embodiment, apprenticeship learning, skill, labor, expertise, and tacit knowledge are used to explore distinctions and connections among art, craft, and science. We will also discuss the commoditization of craft into market goods, collectible art, and tourism industries. Ethnographic and historical case studies include textiles, glassblowing, quilting, cheese making, industrial design, home cooking, factory and laboratory work, CAD-CAM. In-class demonstrations and hands-on craft projects will be included.

Subjects

21A.501 | STS.074 | craft | technique | design | apprenticeship | learning | skill | labor | expertise | tacit knowledge | art | science | market goods | tourism industry | textiles | glassblowing | quilting | cheesemaking | industrial design | home cooking | technology | artisan | technician | machine | knitting | glass | modernism | tools | embodied practice | value | global economy | design politics | craft politics | collecting | display | authenticity | craftivism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Dance | Rap | Black | breaking | visual culture | Music | African | American | African-American | world music | DJ | history | literature | sexuality | misogyny | feminism | performance | electronic music | activism | politics | consumerism | race | artist | racism | turntablism | gangsta | gangster | beats | graffiti | fashion | popular culture | urban | authenticity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 Network and Computer Security is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | Bitcoin | encryption | block ciphers | cryptographic hash functions | one-time pad | stream ciphers | web browser security | biometrics | Viruses | electronic voting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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