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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT)

Description

What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context. What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context.

Subjects

19th century | 19th century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 1800s | 1800s | novel | novel | great books | great books | literary canon | literary canon | American authors | American authors | colonial America | colonial America | native American | native American | Puritan | Puritan | Nathanial Hawthorne | Nathanial Hawthorne | Scarlet Letter | Scarlet Letter | Lydia Maria Child | Lydia Maria Child | Hobomok | Hobomok | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Huck Finn | Huck Finn | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Benito Cereno | Benito Cereno | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | authors | authors | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | Civil War | Civil War | Walt Whitman | Walt Whitman | gender | gender | race | race | social | social | political | political | realities | realities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.512 American Authors: Autobiography and Memoir (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: Autobiography and Memoir (MIT)

Description

What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel. What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel.

Subjects

American authors | American authors | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | autobiography | autobiography | biography | biography | memoir | memoir | family | family | American culture | American culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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High school graduation photo of Lois Lenski - Florida High school graduation photo of Lois Lenski - Florida

Description

Subjects

portraits | portraits | florida | florida | authors | authors | loislenski | loislenski

License

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21H.105 American Classics (MIT) 21H.105 American Classics (MIT)

Description

This subject is devoted to reading and discussing basic American historical texts that are often cited but often remain unread, understanding their meaning, and assessing their continuing significance in American culture. Since it is a "Communications Intensive" subject, 21H.105 is also dedicated to improving students' capacities to write and speak well. It requires a substantial amount of writing, participation in discussions, and individual presentations to the class. This subject is devoted to reading and discussing basic American historical texts that are often cited but often remain unread, understanding their meaning, and assessing their continuing significance in American culture. Since it is a "Communications Intensive" subject, 21H.105 is also dedicated to improving students' capacities to write and speak well. It requires a substantial amount of writing, participation in discussions, and individual presentations to the class.

Subjects

classic documents in American history from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries | classic documents in American history from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries | writings by authors such as John Winthrop | writings by authors such as John Winthrop | Thomas Jefferson | Thomas Jefferson | James Madison | James Madison | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | William Lloyd Garrison | William Lloyd Garrison | Abraham Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln | Horatio Alger | Horatio Alger | Franklin D. Roosevelt | Franklin D. Roosevelt | Betty Friedan | Betty Friedan | Martin Luther King | Martin Luther King | Jr | Jr | Martin Luther King | Jr | Martin Luther King | Jr

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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A declaration of truth to Benjamin Hoadly: one of the high priests of the land, and of the degree whom men call bishops. By a ministring friend, who writ to Tho. Bradbury, a dealer in many words. A declaration of truth to Benjamin Hoadly: one of the high priests of the land, and of the degree whom men call bishops. By a ministring friend, who writ to Tho. Bradbury, a dealer in many words.

Description

ebook version of A declaration of truth to Benjamin Hoadly: one of the high priests of the land, and of the degree whom men call bishops. By a ministring friend, who writ to Tho. Bradbury, a dealer in many words. ebook version of A declaration of truth to Benjamin Hoadly: one of the high priests of the land, and of the degree whom men call bishops. By a ministring friend, who writ to Tho. Bradbury, a dealer in many words.

Subjects

kind | kind | Christian life -- Anglican authors | Christian life -- Anglican authors | Christian literature | Christian literature | Hoadly | Benjamin | -- 1676-1761 | Hoadly | Benjamin | -- 1676-1761 | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT)

Description

What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context.

Subjects

19th century | nineteenth century | 1800s | novel | great books | literary canon | American authors | colonial America | native American | Puritan | Nathanial Hawthorne | Scarlet Letter | Lydia Maria Child | Hobomok | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Huck Finn | Herman Melville | Benito Cereno | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | United States | culture | historical context | African-American | authors | William Wells Brown | Harriet Jacobs | industrial revolution | Civil War | Walt Whitman | gender | race | social | political | realities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Portrait of writer, poet Kirby Congdon - Key West Portrait of writer, poet Kirby Congdon - Key West

Description

Subjects

portraits | portraits | florida | florida | writers | writers | keywest | keywest | poets | poets | authors | authors | kirbycongdon | kirbycongdon

License

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The Don Fowler Lecture 2016: Interpretation and the Metaphor of Authority

Description

The 2016 Don Fowler Memorial Lecture, delivered by Professor Alison Sharrock of the University of Manchester. The Don Fowler Memorial Lecture Series was founded in 2000 in in memory of former Classics Fellow of Jesus, Don Paul Fowler, who died in 1999 at the age of 47. The annual lecture series in his name, hosted by Jesus College and inaugurated by a lecture delivered in May 2001 by Professor Stephen Hinds of the University of Washington, has established itself as the foremost public lecture series on Latin literature worldwide. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

classical literature | authorship | interpretation | readership | intertextuality | textual criticism | classical literature | authorship | interpretation | readership | intertextuality | textual criticism | 2016-05-12

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT)

Description

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor,

Subjects

women authors | women authors | comfort women | comfort women | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | slave novel | slave novel | sensationalism | sensationalism | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | sentimentalism | realism | realism | postmodern fiction | postmodern fiction | American Revolution | American Revolution | industrialization | industrialization | urbanization | urbanization | Harlem Renaissance | Harlem Renaissance | Puritanism | Puritanism | SP.517 | SP.517 | WMN.517 | WMN.517

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT)

Description

This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays. This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays.

Subjects

Extensive reading | Extensive reading | major poets | major poets | evolution of each poet's work | evolution of each poet's work | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | recognition of beauty | recognition of beauty | justice | justice | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | British literary authors | British literary authors | 19th century | 19th century | literature | literature | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | Wordsworth | Keats | Wordsworth | Keats | Mary Robinson | Mary Robinson | Mary and Percy Shelley | Mary and Percy Shelley | Thomas De Quincey | Thomas De Quincey | Dickens | Dickens | Walter Pater | Walter Pater | Wilde | Wilde

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between. This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between.

Subjects

Nineteenth-century | Nineteenth-century | American | American | authors | authors | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Martin Delany | Martin Delany | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | Dred | Dred | Frances E. W. Harper | Frances E. W. Harper | Charles Chesnutt | Charles Chesnutt | Civil War | Civil War | Pudd'nhead Wilson | Pudd'nhead Wilson | racial tensions | racial tensions | social | social | political | political | realities. | realities.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT)

Description

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor,

Subjects

women authors | women authors | comfort women | comfort women | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | slave novel | slave novel | sensationalism | sensationalism | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | sentimentalism | realism | realism | postmodern fiction | postmodern fiction | American Revolution | American Revolution | industrialization | industrialization | urbanization | urbanization | Harlem Renaissance | Harlem Renaissance | Puritanism | Puritanism | SP.517 | SP.517 | WMN.517 | WMN.517

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT) 24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally. The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | problems | problems | philosophers | philosophers | think | think | existence | existence | God | God | reason | reason | faith | faith | mind-body | mind-body | freewill | freewill | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | standards | standards | moral conduct | moral conduct | history | history | contemporary authors | contemporary authors | skills | skills | critical | critical | argumentative | argumentative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.512 American Authors: Autobiography and Memoir (MIT)

Description

What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel.

Subjects

American authors | captivity narrative | autobiography | biography | memoir | family | American culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT)

Description

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor,

Subjects

women authors | comfort women | captivity narrative | slave novel | sensationalism | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | realism | postmodern fiction | American Revolution | industrialization | urbanization | Harlem Renaissance | Puritanism | SP.517 | WMN.517

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally.

Subjects

Philosophy | problems | philosophers | think | existence | God | reason | faith | mind-body | freewill | moral responsibility | standards | moral conduct | history | contemporary authors | skills | critical | argumentative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Writing what you know

Description

Do you want to improve your descriptive writing? This free course will help you to develop your perception of the world about you and enable you to see the familiar things in everyday life in a new light. You will also learn how authors use their own personal histories to form the basis of their work.

Subjects

Creative Writing | writing | creative writing | authors | A215_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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Writing what you know

Description

Do you want to improve your descriptive writing? This free course, Writing what you know, will help you to develop your perception of the world about you and enable you to see the familiar things in everyday life in a new light. You will also learn how authors use their own personal histories to form the basis of their work. First published on Thu, 25 Aug 2016 as Writing what you know . To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Creative Writing | A215_1 | writing | creative writing | authors | Skills for study: Writing and English

License

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Rudyard Kipling Addressing American Soldiers During World War I

Description

Subjects

ohio | history | wwi | worldwari | worldwarone | soldiers | greatwar | firstworldwar | poets | authors | kipling | rudyardkipling | upperarlington | franklincounty | thegreatwar | josephrudyardkipling | uaarchives | httpwwwuaarchivesorg | norwestermagazine

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Start writing fiction

Description

Have you always wanted to write, but never quite had the courage to start? This free course, Start writing fiction, will give you an insight into how authors create their characters and settings. You will also be able to look at the different genres for fiction. First published on Mon, 13 Jun 2016 as Start writing fiction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Creative Writing | A174_1 | fiction | creative writing | authors | Skills for study: Writing and English

License

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT)

Description

This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays.

Subjects

Extensive reading | major poets | evolution of each poet's work | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | recognition of beauty | justice | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | British literary authors | 19th century | literature | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | Wordsworth | Keats | Mary Robinson | Mary and Percy Shelley | Thomas De Quincey | Dickens | Walter Pater | Wilde

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Writers reading: favourite books

Description

Authors:  Michiel Heyns, Finuala Dowling, Imraan Coovadia, Yewande Omotoso, Henrietta Rose-Innes What books do writers read for pleasure? This course will reveal which recent books five prominent South African writers are currently enjoying and why. Clicked 62 times. Last clicked 07/29/2014 - 22:50. Teaching & Learning Context:  For anyone interested in learning more about what prominent SA writers read for pleasure.

Subjects

Centre for Higher Education Development | Centre for Open Learning | Audio | Audio Lectures | English | Post-secondary | authors | Finuala Dowling | Henrietta Rose-Innes | Imraan Coovadia | literature | poetry | poets | SA writers | South African writers | Yewande Omotoso

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.5/za/

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between.

Subjects

Nineteenth-century | American | authors | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | United States | culture | historical context | African-American | Frederick Douglass | William Wells Brown | Martin Delany | Harriet Jacobs | Dred | Frances E. W. Harper | Charles Chesnutt | Civil War | Pudd'nhead Wilson | racial tensions | social | political | realities.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Start writing fiction

Description

Have you always wanted to write but never quite had the courage to start? This free course

Subjects

Creative Writing | fiction | creative writing | authors | A174_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT)

Description

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor,

Subjects

women authors | comfort women | captivity narrative | slave novel | sensationalism | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | realism | postmodern fiction | American Revolution | industrialization | urbanization | Harlem Renaissance | Puritanism | SP.517 | WMN.517

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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