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7.343 Sophisticated Survival Skills of Simple Microorganisms (MIT) 7.343 Sophisticated Survival Skills of Simple Microorganisms (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will discuss the microbial physiology and genetics of stress responses in aquatic ecosystems, astrobiology, bacterial pathogenesis and other environments. We will learn about classical and novel methods utilized by researchers to uncover bacterial mechanisms induced under both general and environment-specific stresses. Finally, we will compare and contrast models for bacterial stress responses to gain an understanding of distinct mechanisms of survival and of why there are differences among bacterial genera. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly In this course, we will discuss the microbial physiology and genetics of stress responses in aquatic ecosystems, astrobiology, bacterial pathogenesis and other environments. We will learn about classical and novel methods utilized by researchers to uncover bacterial mechanisms induced under both general and environment-specific stresses. Finally, we will compare and contrast models for bacterial stress responses to gain an understanding of distinct mechanisms of survival and of why there are differences among bacterial genera. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly

Subjects

microbial physiology | microbial physiology | genetics | genetics | stress | stress | astrobiology | astrobiology | pathogenesis | pathogenesis | Escherichia coli | Escherichia coli | cyanobacteria | cyanobacteria | bleaching | bleaching | deprivation | deprivation | chlorosis | chlorosis | pollutants | pollutants | methylobacteria | methylobacteria | pathogen | pathogen | reactive oxygen species | reactive oxygen species | infection | infection | superoxides | superoxides | phage | phage | Deinococcus | Deinococcus | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy

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7.347 Living Dangerously: How the Immune System Maintains Peace with Trillions of Commensal Bacteria while Preventing Pathogenic Invasions (MIT) 7.347 Living Dangerously: How the Immune System Maintains Peace with Trillions of Commensal Bacteria while Preventing Pathogenic Invasions (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will examine how the immune system acts to destroy pathogenic invaders while tolerating colonization by necessary commensal bacteria. As a counterpoint, we will also explore sophisticated strategies that help some bacteria evade our immune system. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching. In this course, we will examine how the immune system acts to destroy pathogenic invaders while tolerating colonization by necessary commensal bacteria. As a counterpoint, we will also explore sophisticated strategies that help some bacteria evade our immune system. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

commensal bacteria | commensal bacteria | mucosal epithelia | mucosal epithelia | host-pathogen interactions | host-pathogen interactions | immunology | immunology | GTPase | GTPase | cell signaling | cell signaling | bacterial toxins | bacterial toxins | Campylobacter | Campylobacter | Salmonella | Salmonella | E. coli | E. coli | strain O157:H17 | gut microbiome | dysbiosis | autoimmune diseases | strain O157:H17 | gut microbiome | dysbiosis | autoimmune diseases

License

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7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology (MIT) 7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality. Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality.

Subjects

amino acids | amino acids | carboxyl group | carboxyl group | amino group | amino group | side chains | side chains | polar | polar | hydrophobic | hydrophobic | primary structure | primary structure | secondary structure | secondary structure | tertiary structure | tertiary structure | quaternary structure | quaternary structure | x-ray crystallography | x-ray crystallography | alpha helix | alpha helix | beta sheet | beta sheet | ionic bond | ionic bond | non-polar bond | non-polar bond | van der Waals interactions | van der Waals interactions | proton gradient | proton gradient | cyclic photophosphorylation | cyclic photophosphorylation | sunlight | sunlight | ATP | ATP | chlorophyll | chlorophyll | chlorophyll a | chlorophyll a | electrons | electrons | hydrogen sulfide | hydrogen sulfide | biosynthesis | biosynthesis | non-cyclic photophosphorylation | non-cyclic photophosphorylation | photosystem II | photosystem II | photosystem I | photosystem I | cyanobacteria | cyanobacteria | chloroplast | chloroplast | stroma | stroma | thylakoid membrane | thylakoid membrane | Genetics | Genetics | Mendel | Mendel | Mendel's Laws | Mendel's Laws | cloning | cloning | restriction enzymes | restriction enzymes | vector | vector | insert DNA | insert DNA | ligase | ligase | library | library | E.Coli | E.Coli | phosphatase | phosphatase | yeast | yeast | transformation | transformation | ARG1 gene | ARG1 gene | ARG1 mutant yeast | ARG1 mutant yeast | yeast wild-type | yeast wild-type | cloning by complementation | cloning by complementation | Human Beta Globin gene | Human Beta Globin gene | protein tetramer | protein tetramer | vectors | vectors | antibodies | antibodies | human promoter | human promoter | splicing | splicing | mRNA | mRNA | cDNA | cDNA | reverse transcriptase | reverse transcriptase | plasmid | plasmid | electrophoresis | electrophoresis | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | primer | primer | template | template | capillary tube | capillary tube | laser detector | laser detector | human genome project | human genome project | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | clone | clone | primer walking | primer walking | subcloning | subcloning | computer assembly | computer assembly | shotgun sequencing | shotgun sequencing | open reading frame | open reading frame | databases | databases | polymerase chain reaction (PCR) | polymerase chain reaction (PCR) | polymerase | polymerase | nucleotides | nucleotides | Thermus aquaticus | Thermus aquaticus | Taq polymerase | Taq polymerase | thermocycler | thermocycler | resequencing | resequencing | in vitro fertilization | in vitro fertilization | pre-implantation diagnostics | pre-implantation diagnostics | forensics | forensics | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | DNA sequences | DNA sequences | therapeutic proteins | therapeutic proteins | E. coli | E. coli | disease-causing mutations | disease-causing mutations | cleavage of DNA | cleavage of DNA | bacterial transformation | bacterial transformation | recombinant DNA revolution | recombinant DNA revolution | biotechnology industry | biotechnology industry | Robert Swanson | Robert Swanson | toxin gene | toxin gene | pathogenic bacterium | pathogenic bacterium | biomedical research | biomedical research | S. Pyogenes | S. Pyogenes | origin of replication | origin of replication

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7.345 Survival in Extreme Conditions: The Bacterial Stress Response (MIT) 7.345 Survival in Extreme Conditions: The Bacterial Stress Response (MIT)

Description

Bacteria survive in almost all environments on Earth, including some considered extremely harsh. From the steaming hot springs of Yellowstone to the frozen tundra of the arctic to the barren deserts of Chile, microbes have been found thriving. Their tenacity to survive in such extreme and varied conditions allows them to play fundamental roles in global nutrient cycling. Microbes also cause a wide range of human diseases and can survive inhospitable conditions found in the human body. In this course, we will examine the molecular systems that bacteria use to adapt to changes in their environment. We will consider stresses commonly encountered, such as starvation, oxidative stress and heat shock, and also discuss how the adaptive responses affect the evolution of the bacteria. This course Bacteria survive in almost all environments on Earth, including some considered extremely harsh. From the steaming hot springs of Yellowstone to the frozen tundra of the arctic to the barren deserts of Chile, microbes have been found thriving. Their tenacity to survive in such extreme and varied conditions allows them to play fundamental roles in global nutrient cycling. Microbes also cause a wide range of human diseases and can survive inhospitable conditions found in the human body. In this course, we will examine the molecular systems that bacteria use to adapt to changes in their environment. We will consider stresses commonly encountered, such as starvation, oxidative stress and heat shock, and also discuss how the adaptive responses affect the evolution of the bacteria. This course

Subjects

bacteria | bacteria | microbes | microbes | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | cellular response | cellular response | model systems | model systems | Escherichia coli | Escherichia coli | Bacillus subtilis | Bacillus subtilis | oxidative stress | oxidative stress | starvation | starvation | heat shock | heat shock | dormant state | dormant state | microbial stress response | microbial stress response | bacterial genetics | bacterial genetics | microbiology | microbiology | sporulation | sporulation | sRNAs | sRNAs | histidine kinases | histidine kinases | response regulators | response regulators | mRNAs | mRNAs | RpoS | RpoS | small molecules | small molecules | efflux pumps | efflux pumps | Pseudomonas aeruginosa | Pseudomonas aeruginosa

License

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Human Microbiota in Health

Description

A tutorial providing information on the human commensal bacteria and the infections they cause. A series of questions based on the culture and Gram stain of clinical samples guides the reader into the correct identification of the causative organism of infection. Full explanations of the answers are provided. This is a Questionmark Perception file. The QTIXML file needs to be opened in QP Authoring Manager, converted to an assessment and exported into your own VLE.

Subjects

clinical samples | bacteria | infection | human commensal bacteria | microbiota | microbiology | medical microbiology | bacterial identification | gram stain | ukoer | bioukoer | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Microorgansims of Medical Importance Part 3 - Bacteria

Description

An Articulate presentation about bacteria. This unit concentrates on the shape, identification and classification of bacteria, and continues to explore bacterial external structures, slime and spores. This part 3 af a series of 3.

Subjects

microbiology | bioukoer | ukoer | bacteria | shape | identification | gram stain | bacterial classification | bacterial external structures | slime | spores | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Microbiology of Natural Environments

Description

A suite of resources describing the microbiology of natural environments. This resource includes information on environmental sampling, the role of organisms in the fixation of nitrogen, how to count soil bacteria, how to examine iron-rich water and visualisation and examination of cyanobacteria.

Subjects

microbiology | ukoer | bioukoer | cyanobacteria | nitrogen fixation | environmental sampling | bacteria | bacterial counts | visualisation | soil | iron | microscopy | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Essentials of Medical Microbiology III - Part 1 of 2

Description

This presentation deals with the bacterial identification and provides an introduction into epidemiology. It provides information on the identification of bacteria including identification by physical attributes and the use of classical biochemical and staining techniques. This is concluded with a generalised introduction into epidemiology. A help file is included and should be read first.

Subjects

microbiology | bacterial identification | epidemiology | bacilli | cocci | ziehl neelson stain | spores | fastidious bacteria | antibiotic resistance | identification | bacterial metabolism | catalase test | coagulase test | oxidase test | antigenic structure | genetic fingerprinting | strain differentiation | bioukoer | ukoer | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT) 7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT)

Description

Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current

Subjects

evolution | evolution | biocatalyst | biocatalyst | mutation | mutation | library | library | recombination | recombination | directed evolution | directed evolution | enzyme | enzyme | point mutation | point mutation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | DNA | DNA | gene | gene | complementation | complementation | affinity | affinity | phage | phage | ribosome display | ribosome display | yeast surface display | yeast surface display | bacterial cell surface display | bacterial cell surface display | IVC | IVC | FACS | FACS | active site | active site

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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API Strips

Description

Video demonstration of how to set up API strips for microbiological investigation.

Subjects

microbiology | bacteria | bacterial identification | api strips | api | bioukoer | ukoer | virtual analytical laboratory | val | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT) 7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT)

Description

The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und

Subjects

lethal poison | lethal poison | Ricin | Ricin | Diphtheria | Diphtheria | contagious bacterial disease | contagious bacterial disease | tetracycline | tetracycline | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | drug resistance | drug resistance | protein engineering | protein engineering | cystic fibrosis | cystic fibrosis | muscular dystrophy | muscular dystrophy | ribosome | ribosome | ribosomal proteins | ribosomal proteins | rRNA | rRNA | mRNA | mRNA | tRNA | tRNA | translation factors | translation factors | genetic code | genetic code | E. coli ribosome | E. coli ribosome | prokaryotes | prokaryotes | eukaryotes | eukaryotes | Shiga | Shiga | Diphtheria toxin | Diphtheria toxin | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Chloramphenicol | Chloramphenicol | Aminoglycoside | Aminoglycoside

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.340 Under the Radar Screen: How Bugs Trick Our Immune Defenses (MIT) 7.340 Under the Radar Screen: How Bugs Trick Our Immune Defenses (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will explore the specific ways by which microbes defeat our immune system and the molecular mechanisms that are under attack (phagocytosis, the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway, MHC I/II antigen presentation). Through our discussion and dissection of the primary research literature, we will explore aspects of host-pathogen interactions. We will particularly emphasize the experimental techniques used in the field and how to read and understand research data. Technological advances in the fight against microbes will also be discussed, with specific examples. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about In this course, we will explore the specific ways by which microbes defeat our immune system and the molecular mechanisms that are under attack (phagocytosis, the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway, MHC I/II antigen presentation). Through our discussion and dissection of the primary research literature, we will explore aspects of host-pathogen interactions. We will particularly emphasize the experimental techniques used in the field and how to read and understand research data. Technological advances in the fight against microbes will also be discussed, with specific examples. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about

Subjects

HIV | HIV | mycobacterium tuberculosis | mycobacterium tuberculosis | malaria | malaria | influenza | influenza | immune system | immune system | pathogens | pathogens | viruses | viruses | bacteria | bacteria | parasites | parasites | microbes | microbes | phagocytosis | phagocytosis | ubiquitin/proteasome pathway | ubiquitin/proteasome pathway | MHC I/II antigen presentation | MHC I/II antigen presentation | Salmonella | Salmonella | pathogen-associated molecular patterns | pathogen-associated molecular patterns | PAMP | PAMP | Toll-like receptors | Toll-like receptors | TLR | TLR | Vaccinia virus | Vaccinia virus | Proteasome | Proteasome | Ubiquitin; deubiquinating enzymes | Ubiquitin; deubiquinating enzymes | DUB | DUB | Herpes simplex virus | Herpes simplex virus | HSV | HSV | Yersinia | Yersinia | viral budding | viral budding | Human cytomegalovirus | Human cytomegalovirus | HCMV | HCMV | Histocompatiblity | Histocompatiblity | AIDS | AIDS | Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpes virus | Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpes virus | Mixoma virus | Mixoma virus | Epstein Barr virus | Epstein Barr virus | EBV | EBV | Burkitt?s B cell lymphoma | Burkitt?s B cell lymphoma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.591J Systems Biology (MIT) 8.591J Systems Biology (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an introduction to cellular and population-level systems biology with an emphasis on synthetic biology, modeling of genetic networks, cell-cell interactions, and evolutionary dynamics. Cellular systems include genetic switches and oscillators, network motifs, genetic network evolution, and cellular decision-making. Population-level systems include models of pattern formation, cell-cell communication, and evolutionary systems biology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an introduction to cellular and population-level systems biology with an emphasis on synthetic biology, modeling of genetic networks, cell-cell interactions, and evolutionary dynamics. Cellular systems include genetic switches and oscillators, network motifs, genetic network evolution, and cellular decision-making. Population-level systems include models of pattern formation, cell-cell communication, and evolutionary systems biology.

Subjects

molecular systems biology | molecular systems biology | genetic networks | genetic networks | control theory | control theory | synthetic genetic switches | synthetic genetic switches | bacterial chemotaxis | bacterial chemotaxis | genetic oscillators | genetic oscillators | circadian rhythms | circadian rhythms | cellular systems biology | cellular systems biology | reaction diffusion equations | reaction diffusion equations | local activation | local activation | global inhibition models | global inhibition models | gradient sensing systems | gradient sensing systems | center finding networks | center finding networks | general pattern formation models | general pattern formation models | cell-cell communication | cell-cell communication | quorum sensing | quorum sensing

License

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7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT) 7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT)

Description

Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology. Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology.

Subjects

microbiology | microbiology | genetics | genetics | rhodococcus | rhodococcus | bacteria | bacteria | genes | genes | plasmid manipulation | plasmid manipulation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | PCR | PCR | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | enzyme assays | enzyme assays | gene expression | gene expression | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | Gram-positive | Gram-positive | gram-negative | gram-negative | bioconversion processes | bioconversion processes | synthesis | synthesis | precursors | precursors | metabolites | metabolites | genetic complementation | genetic complementation | laboratory | laboratory | lab | lab

License

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7.345 The War on Superbugs: Antibiotic Development and the Emergence of Drug-Resistant Bacteria (MIT) 7.345 The War on Superbugs: Antibiotic Development and the Emergence of Drug-Resistant Bacteria (MIT)

Description

Bacteria and fungi have produced antibiotics, small molecules that can prevent the growth of or kill bacteria by inhibiting essential biological pathways, as a defense mechanism long before humans walked the earth. The discovery of antibiotics and their implementation in the clinic radically changed modern medicine, saving countless lives by treating infections that were once difficult to cure, such as syphilis, strep throat and tuberculosis. During this course, we will cover many aspects of antibiotics including techniques used to discover these inhibitors, their mode of action and use in medicine. For example, we will learn about the techniques used to discover antibiotics, such as penicillin and vancomycin. We will discuss antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the molecular mechanisms under Bacteria and fungi have produced antibiotics, small molecules that can prevent the growth of or kill bacteria by inhibiting essential biological pathways, as a defense mechanism long before humans walked the earth. The discovery of antibiotics and their implementation in the clinic radically changed modern medicine, saving countless lives by treating infections that were once difficult to cure, such as syphilis, strep throat and tuberculosis. During this course, we will cover many aspects of antibiotics including techniques used to discover these inhibitors, their mode of action and use in medicine. For example, we will learn about the techniques used to discover antibiotics, such as penicillin and vancomycin. We will discuss antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the molecular mechanisms under

Subjects

superbugs | superbugs | antibiotics | antibiotics | drug-resistance | drug-resistance | bacteria | bacteria | infection | infection | penicillin | penicillin | drug discovery | drug discovery | vancomycin | vancomycin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.322J Genetic Neurobiology (MIT) 9.322J Genetic Neurobiology (MIT)

Description

This course deals with the specific functions of neurons, the interactions of neurons in development, and the organization of neuronal ensembles to produce behavior. Topics covered include the analysis of mutations, and molecular analysis of the genes required for nervous system function. In particular, this course focuses on research work done with nematodes, fruit flies, mice, and humans. This course deals with the specific functions of neurons, the interactions of neurons in development, and the organization of neuronal ensembles to produce behavior. Topics covered include the analysis of mutations, and molecular analysis of the genes required for nervous system function. In particular, this course focuses on research work done with nematodes, fruit flies, mice, and humans.

Subjects

neurobiology | neurobiology | genetics | genetics | bacterial chemoreception | bacterial chemoreception | neurogenomics | neurogenomics | genetic analysis | genetic analysis | axonal pathfinding | axonal pathfinding | neurodevelopment | neurodevelopment | synapse formation | synapse formation | neurogenetics | neurogenetics | higher brain function | higher brain function | neuronal ensembles | neuronal ensembles | molecular analysis | molecular analysis

License

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The Bacteriology of Faeces and Identification of Bacteria

Description

An Articulate Engage interaction providing a comprehensive illustrated walk-through of the laboratory techniques required to analyse a faecal sample. Additionally there is a complete illustrated walk-through of the stages involved in the identification of a member of the genus bacillus. Finally, a walk-through showing the use of API 10 system for the identification of Enterobacteriaceae is included. A help file is provided and should be read first.

Subjects

ukoer | bacteria | microbiology | faeces | faecal samples | gram stain | catalase test | pastorex | bacillus | enterobacteriaceae | bioukoer | api | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.016 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.016 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

7.016 Introductory Biology provides an introduction to fundamental principles of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics for understanding the functions of living systems. Taught for the first time in Fall 2013, this course covers examples of the use of chemical biology and twenty-first-century molecular genetics in understanding human health and therapeutic intervention. The MIT Biology Department Introductory Biology courses, 7.012, 7.013, 7.014, 7.015, and 7.016 all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these mol 7.016 Introductory Biology provides an introduction to fundamental principles of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics for understanding the functions of living systems. Taught for the first time in Fall 2013, this course covers examples of the use of chemical biology and twenty-first-century molecular genetics in understanding human health and therapeutic intervention. The MIT Biology Department Introductory Biology courses, 7.012, 7.013, 7.014, 7.015, and 7.016 all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these mol

Subjects

biochemistry | biochemistry | molecular biology | molecular biology | genetics | genetics | human genetics | human genetics | pedigrees | pedigrees | biochemical genetics | biochemical genetics | chemical biology | chemical biology | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | recombinant DNA technology | recombinant DNA technology | cell biology | cell biology | cancer | cancer | viruses | viruses | HIV | HIV | bacteria | bacteria | antibiotics | antibiotics | human health | human health | therapeutic intervention | therapeutic intervention | cell signaling | cell signaling | evolution | evolution | reproduction | reproduction | infectious diseases | infectious diseases | therapeutics | therapeutics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Culturing Bacteria

Description

An articulate presentation that includes several engage produced units that provide scripted photographic illustrations of microbiological techniques used in the culturing of bacteria. The elements included are: Dispensing a broth aseptically; Plating out a broth for single colonies; Assessing the degree of contamination in the laboratory; Separation of mixtures of bacteria; Inoculation of a broth culture. Each of these elements is contained as an individual unit in the zip file. Please note, these can be played on a web server, but can only be amended using the Articulate engage programme. Full instructions on their use are included in the zip file.

Subjects

ukoer | aseptic technique | contamination | plating out | dispensing | culturing bacteria | separation of mixtures | bacteria | laboratory | inoculation | single colonies | bioukoer | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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D0000P0040

Description

Intracellular bacteria in acute neutrophillic inflammation

Subjects

inflammation | intracellularbacteria | neutrophil | neutrophils | inflammatory | cytology | cell | whiteblood | whitebloodcell | whitebloodcells | bacteria | intracellular | eosinophil | infection | acute | bugs | svmsvet

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

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Nottingham Vet School | FlickR

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8.591J Systems Biology (MIT) 8.591J Systems Biology (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the mathematical modeling techniques needed to address key questions in modern biology. An overview of modeling techniques in molecular biology and genetics, cell biology and developmental biology is covered. Key experiments that validate mathematical models are also discussed, as well as molecular, cellular, and developmental systems biology, bacterial chemotaxis, genetic oscillators, control theory and genetic networks, and gradient sensing systems. Additional specific topics include: constructing and modeling of genetic networks, lambda phage as a genetic switch, synthetic genetic switches, circadian rhythms, reaction diffusion equations, local activation and global inhibition models, center finding networks, general pattern formation models, modeling cell-cell co This course introduces the mathematical modeling techniques needed to address key questions in modern biology. An overview of modeling techniques in molecular biology and genetics, cell biology and developmental biology is covered. Key experiments that validate mathematical models are also discussed, as well as molecular, cellular, and developmental systems biology, bacterial chemotaxis, genetic oscillators, control theory and genetic networks, and gradient sensing systems. Additional specific topics include: constructing and modeling of genetic networks, lambda phage as a genetic switch, synthetic genetic switches, circadian rhythms, reaction diffusion equations, local activation and global inhibition models, center finding networks, general pattern formation models, modeling cell-cell co

Subjects

molecular systems biology | molecular systems biology | constructing and modeling of genetic networks | constructing and modeling of genetic networks | control theory and genetic networks | control theory and genetic networks | ambda phage as a genetic switch | ambda phage as a genetic switch | synthetic genetic switches | synthetic genetic switches | bacterial chemotaxis | bacterial chemotaxis | genetic oscillators | genetic oscillators | circadian rhythms | circadian rhythms | cellular systems biology | cellular systems biology | reaction diffusion equations | reaction diffusion equations | local activation and global inhibition models | local activation and global inhibition models | gradient sensing systems | gradient sensing systems | center finding networks | center finding networks | developmental systems biology | developmental systems biology | general pattern formation models | general pattern formation models | modeling cell-cell communication | modeling cell-cell communication | quorum sensing | quorum sensing | models for Drosophilia development | models for Drosophilia development | 8.591 | 8.591 | 7.81 | 7.81

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.347 Living Dangerously: How the Immune System Maintains Peace with Trillions of Commensal Bacteria while Preventing Pathogenic Invasions (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will examine how the immune system acts to destroy pathogenic invaders while tolerating colonization by necessary commensal bacteria. As a counterpoint, we will also explore sophisticated strategies that help some bacteria evade our immune system. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

commensal bacteria | mucosal epithelia | host-pathogen interactions | immunology | GTPase | cell signaling | bacterial toxins | Campylobacter | Salmonella | E. coli | strain O157:H17 | gut microbiome | dysbiosis | autoimmune diseases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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D0000P0040

Description

Intracellular bacteria in acute neutrophillic inflammation

Subjects

inflammation | intracellularbacteria | neutrophil | neutrophils | inflammatory | cytology | cell | whiteblood | whitebloodcell | whitebloodcells | bacteria | intracellular | eosinophil | infection | acute | bugs | svmsvet

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

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Nottingham Vet School | FlickR

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7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT) 7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT)

Description

Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology. Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology.

Subjects

microbiology | microbiology | genetics | genetics | rhodococcus | rhodococcus | bacteria | bacteria | genes | genes | plasmid manipulation | plasmid manipulation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | PCR | PCR | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | enzyme assays | enzyme assays | gene expression | gene expression | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | Gram-positive | Gram-positive | gram-negative | gram-negative | bioconversion processes | bioconversion processes | synthesis | synthesis | precursors | precursors | metabolites | metabolites | genetic complementation | genetic complementation | laboratory | laboratory | lab | lab

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.014 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.014 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health

Subjects

microorganisms | microorganisms | geochemistry | geochemistry | geochemical agents | geochemical agents | biosphere | biosphere | bacterial genetics | bacterial genetics | carbon metabolism | carbon metabolism | energy metabolism | energy metabolism | productivity | productivity | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles | molecular evolution | molecular evolution | population genetics | population genetics | evolution | evolution | population growth | population growth | biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | ecology | ecology | communities | communities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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