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Aerospace Structures Aerospace Structures

Description

The course on Aerospace Structures gives an overview of the analysis and calculus of lightweight structures. This course is dealing with structural design and stress analysis of thin-walled beams, plates and composite estructures. The course on Aerospace Structures gives an overview of the analysis and calculus of lightweight structures. This course is dealing with structural design and stress analysis of thin-walled beams, plates and composite estructures.

Subjects

Aircraft loads | Aircraft loads | ≠a Estruc. | ≠a Estruc. | Bending and shear of open and closed | Bending and shear of open and closed | †beams | †beams | Shear | Shear | Ūa Aeroespacial | Ūa Aeroespacial | Aircraft | Aircraft | Bending of thin rectangular and circular plates | Bending of thin rectangular and circular plates | 2016 | 2016 | Composite and sandwich structures | Composite and sandwich structures | Structural description | Structural description | Thin-walled beams | Thin-walled beams | † beams | † beams | Structures in the aeronautical sector | Structures in the aeronautical sector | Wing | Wing | Bending | Bending | Laminate theory | Laminate theory | Structural component of the aircraft | Structural component of the aircraft | Failure criteria | Failure criteria | Empennage | Empennage | Fuselage | Fuselage | Thin plate theory | Thin plate theory | Torsion | Torsion

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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4.462 Building Technologies II: Building Structural Systems I (MIT) 4.462 Building Technologies II: Building Structural Systems I (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems with an introduction to energy issues in buildings. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of basic systematic and elemental behavior; principles of structural behavior and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The subject introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort, as they relate to building design and construction. This course is the first of two graduate structures courses, the second of which is 4.463. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440. This course serves as an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems with an introduction to energy issues in buildings. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of basic systematic and elemental behavior; principles of structural behavior and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The subject introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort, as they relate to building design and construction. This course is the first of two graduate structures courses, the second of which is 4.463. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440.

Subjects

column buckling | and deflection of beams | column buckling | and deflection of beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | stability of structures | stability of structures | truss analysis | truss analysis | reactions | reactions | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | construction | construction | building technology | building technology | structures | structures | column buckling and deflection of beams | column buckling and deflection of beams

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.461 Building Technology I: Materials and Construction (MIT) 4.461 Building Technology I: Materials and Construction (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems as well as an introduction to energy issues in buildings. It emphasizes basic systematic and elemental behavior, principles of structural behavior, and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The course also introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort. It is a required class for M. Arch. students. This course offers an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems as well as an introduction to energy issues in buildings. It emphasizes basic systematic and elemental behavior, principles of structural behavior, and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The course also introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort. It is a required class for M. Arch. students.

Subjects

structures | structures | building technology | building technology | construction | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | reactions | truss analysis | truss analysis | stability of structures | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | column buckling | deflection of beams | deflection of beams | materials | materials | wood | wood | steel | steel | concrete | concrete

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.463 Building Technologies III: Building Structural Systems II (MIT) 4.463 Building Technologies III: Building Structural Systems II (MIT)

Description

This course addresses advanced topics in structures, exterior envelopes and contemporary production technologies. It continues the exploration of structural elements and systems; expanding to include more complex determinant, indeterminate, long-span and high-rise systems. Some of the topics covered include reinforced concrete, steel and engineered wood design, and an introduction to tensile systems. The contemporary exterior envelope is discussed with an emphasis on the classification of systems, their performance attributes and advanced manufacturing technologies. This course is the second of two graduate structures courses, the first of which is 4.462. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440. This course addresses advanced topics in structures, exterior envelopes and contemporary production technologies. It continues the exploration of structural elements and systems; expanding to include more complex determinant, indeterminate, long-span and high-rise systems. Some of the topics covered include reinforced concrete, steel and engineered wood design, and an introduction to tensile systems. The contemporary exterior envelope is discussed with an emphasis on the classification of systems, their performance attributes and advanced manufacturing technologies. This course is the second of two graduate structures courses, the first of which is 4.462. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440.

Subjects

structures | structures | building technology | building technology | construction | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | reactions | truss analysis | truss analysis | stability of structures | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | column buckling | deflection of beams | deflection of beams

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.463 Building Technologies III: Building Structural Systems II (MIT) 4.463 Building Technologies III: Building Structural Systems II (MIT)

Description

This course addresses advanced topics in structures, exterior envelopes and contemporary production technologies. It continues the exploration of structural elements and systems; expanding to include more complex determinant, indeterminate, long-span and high-rise systems. Some of the topics covered include reinforced concrete, steel and engineered wood design, and an introduction to tensile systems. The contemporary exterior envelope is discussed with an emphasis on the classification of systems, their performance attributes and advanced manufacturing technologies. This course is the second of two graduate structures courses, the first of which is 4.462. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440. This course addresses advanced topics in structures, exterior envelopes and contemporary production technologies. It continues the exploration of structural elements and systems; expanding to include more complex determinant, indeterminate, long-span and high-rise systems. Some of the topics covered include reinforced concrete, steel and engineered wood design, and an introduction to tensile systems. The contemporary exterior envelope is discussed with an emphasis on the classification of systems, their performance attributes and advanced manufacturing technologies. This course is the second of two graduate structures courses, the first of which is 4.462. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440.

Subjects

structures | structures | building technology | building technology | construction | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | reactions | truss analysis | truss analysis | stability of structures | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | column buckling | deflection of beams | deflection of beams

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.440 Basic Structural Theory (MIT) 4.440 Basic Structural Theory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the static behavior of structures and strength of materials. Topics covered include: reactions, truss analysis, stability of structures, stress and strain at a point, shear and bending moment diagrams, stresses in beams, Mohr's Circle, column buckling, and deflection of beams. Laboratory sessions are included where students are asked to solve structural problems by building simple models and testing them. This course introduces the static behavior of structures and strength of materials. Topics covered include: reactions, truss analysis, stability of structures, stress and strain at a point, shear and bending moment diagrams, stresses in beams, Mohr's Circle, column buckling, and deflection of beams. Laboratory sessions are included where students are asked to solve structural problems by building simple models and testing them.

Subjects

structures | structures | building technology | building technology | construction | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | reactions | truss analysis | truss analysis | stability of structures | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | column buckling | deflection of beams | deflection of beams

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.080J Structural Mechanics (13.10J) (MIT) 2.080J Structural Mechanics (13.10J) (MIT)

Description

Fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Residual stresses. Thermal effects. Analysis of beams, columns, tensioned beams, trusses, frames, cables, and shafts of general shape and material, including composites. Elastic buckling of columns. Exact and approximate methods, energy methods, principle of virtual work, introduction to computational structural mechanics. Examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.10J. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanical Engineering), and this course was renumbered 2.080J. Fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Residual stresses. Thermal effects. Analysis of beams, columns, tensioned beams, trusses, frames, cables, and shafts of general shape and material, including composites. Elastic buckling of columns. Exact and approximate methods, energy methods, principle of virtual work, introduction to computational structural mechanics. Examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.10J. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanical Engineering), and this course was renumbered 2.080J.

Subjects

structural mechanics | structural mechanics | mechanical structures | mechanical structures | residual stresses | residual stresses | thermal effects | thermal effects | beams | beams | columns | columns | tensioned beams | tensioned beams | trusses | trusses | frames | frames | arches | arches | cables | cables | shafts | shafts | elastic buckling | elastic buckling | energy methods | energy methods | virtual work | virtual work | computational structural mechanics | computational structural mechanics | 13.10J | 13.10J | 13.10 | 13.10 | 1.573 | 1.573

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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13.10J Structural Mechanics (MIT) 13.10J Structural Mechanics (MIT)

Description

Fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Residual stresses. Thermal effects. Analysis of beams, columns, tensioned beams, trusses, frames, cables, and shafts of general shape and material, including composites. Elastic buckling of columns. Exact and approximate methods, energy methods, principle of virtual work, introduction to computational structural mechanics. Examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures. Fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Residual stresses. Thermal effects. Analysis of beams, columns, tensioned beams, trusses, frames, cables, and shafts of general shape and material, including composites. Elastic buckling of columns. Exact and approximate methods, energy methods, principle of virtual work, introduction to computational structural mechanics. Examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures.

Subjects

structural mechanics | structural mechanics | mechanical structures | mechanical structures | residual stresses | residual stresses | thermal effects | thermal effects | beams | beams | columns | columns | tensioned beams | tensioned beams | trusses | trusses | frames | frames | arches | arches | cables | cables | shafts | shafts | elastic buckling | elastic buckling | energy methods | energy methods | virtual work | virtual work | computational structural mechanics | computational structural mechanics | 1.573J | 1.573J | 13.10 | 13.10 | 1.573 | 1.573

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.462 Building Technologies II: Building Structural Systems I (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems with an introduction to energy issues in buildings. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of basic systematic and elemental behavior; principles of structural behavior and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The subject introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort, as they relate to building design and construction. This course is the first of two graduate structures courses, the second of which is 4.463. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440.

Subjects

column buckling | and deflection of beams | Mohr's Circle | stresses in beams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stress and strain at a point | stability of structures | truss analysis | reactions | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | construction | building technology | structures | column buckling and deflection of beams

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.463 Building Technologies III: Building Structural Systems II (MIT)

Description

This course addresses advanced topics in structures, exterior envelopes and contemporary production technologies. It continues the exploration of structural elements and systems; expanding to include more complex determinant, indeterminate, long-span and high-rise systems. Some of the topics covered include reinforced concrete, steel and engineered wood design, and an introduction to tensile systems. The contemporary exterior envelope is discussed with an emphasis on the classification of systems, their performance attributes and advanced manufacturing technologies. This course is the second of two graduate structures courses, the first of which is 4.462. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440.

Subjects

structures | building technology | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | truss analysis | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | deflection of beams

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.461 Building Technology I: Materials and Construction (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems as well as an introduction to energy issues in buildings. It emphasizes basic systematic and elemental behavior, principles of structural behavior, and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The course also introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort. It is a required class for M. Arch. students.

Subjects

structures | building technology | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | truss analysis | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | deflection of beams | materials | wood | steel | concrete

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids (MIT) 2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids (MIT)

Description

This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course. This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course.

Subjects

linear static analysis | linear static analysis | solids | solids | structures | structures | nonlinear static analysis | nonlinear static analysis | heat transfer | heat transfer | fluid flows | fluid flows | finite element methods | finite element methods | ADINA | ADINA | student work | student work | beams | beams | plates | plates | shells | shells | displacement | displacement | conduction | conduction | convection | convection | radiation | radiation | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | incompressible fluids | incompressible fluids | acoustic fluids | acoustic fluids

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT) 22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT)

Description

The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi

Subjects

Interaction of radiation with biological material | Interaction of radiation with biological material | how different types of radiation deposit energy | how different types of radiation deposit energy | secondary radiations | secondary radiations | how radiation affects cells | how radiation affects cells | biological effects | biological effects | effects of radiation on biological systems | effects of radiation on biological systems | DNA damage | DNA damage | in vitro cell survival models | in vitro cell survival models | in vivo mammalian systems | in vivo mammalian systems | radiation therapy | radiation therapy | radiation syndromes in humans | radiation syndromes in humans | carcinogenesis | carcinogenesis | Environmental radiation sources | Environmental radiation sources | radiation protection | radiation protection | cells | cells | tissues | tissues | radiation interactions | radiation interactions | radiation chemistry | radiation chemistry | LET | LET | tracks | tracks | chromosome damags | chromosome damags | in vivo | in vivo | in vitro | in vitro | cell survival curves | cell survival curves | dose response | dose response | RBE | RBE | clustered damage | clustered damage | radiation response | radiation response | tumor kinetics | tumor kinetics | tumor radiobiology | tumor radiobiology | fractionation | fractionation | protons | protons | alpha particles | alpha particles | whole body exposure | whole body exposure | chronic exposure | chronic exposure | space | space | microbeams | microbeams | radon | radon | background radiation | background radiation | 22.55 | 22.55 | HST.560 | HST.560

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Selecting columns and beams : presentation transcript

Description

This open educational resource was released through the Higher Education Academy Engineering Subject Centre Open Engineering Resources Pilot project. The project was funded by HEFCE and the JISC/HE Academy UKOER programme.

Subjects

ukoer | engscoer | cc-by | leicester college | leicester college tech | leicestercollegeoer | engineering department | education | higher education | learning | length | gyration | stress | buckling | bending | beams | radius of gyration | slenderness ratio | selecting column and beams | compression | direct compressive stress | modulus of section | loading | edexcel hn unit | edexcel | nqf l4 | engineering science | columns | loads | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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4.461 Building Technology I: Materials and Construction (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems as well as an introduction to energy issues in buildings. It emphasizes basic systematic and elemental behavior, principles of structural behavior, and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The course also introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort. It is a required class for M. Arch. students.

Subjects

structures | building technology | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | truss analysis | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | deflection of beams | materials | wood | steel | concrete

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

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4.463 Building Technologies III: Building Structural Systems II (MIT)

Description

This course addresses advanced topics in structures, exterior envelopes and contemporary production technologies. It continues the exploration of structural elements and systems; expanding to include more complex determinant, indeterminate, long-span and high-rise systems. Some of the topics covered include reinforced concrete, steel and engineered wood design, and an introduction to tensile systems. The contemporary exterior envelope is discussed with an emphasis on the classification of systems, their performance attributes and advanced manufacturing technologies. This course is the second of two graduate structures courses, the first of which is 4.462. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440.

Subjects

structures | building technology | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | truss analysis | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | deflection of beams

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields | P-representation and classical fields | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | quantum teleportation | quantum teleportation

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1.050 Solid Mechanics (MIT) 1.050 Solid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. 1.050 is a sophomore-level engineering mechanics course, commonly labelled "Statics and Strength of Materials" or "Solid Mechanics I." This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and methods of structural mechanics. Topics covered include: static equilibrium, force resultants, support conditions, analysis of determinate planar structures (beams, trusses, frames), stresses and strains in structural elements, states of stress (shear, bending, torsion), statically indeterminate systems, displacements and deformations, introduction to matrix methods, elastic stability, and approximate methods. Design exercises are used to encourage creative student initiative and systems thinking. Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. 1.050 is a sophomore-level engineering mechanics course, commonly labelled "Statics and Strength of Materials" or "Solid Mechanics I." This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and methods of structural mechanics. Topics covered include: static equilibrium, force resultants, support conditions, analysis of determinate planar structures (beams, trusses, frames), stresses and strains in structural elements, states of stress (shear, bending, torsion), statically indeterminate systems, displacements and deformations, introduction to matrix methods, elastic stability, and approximate methods. Design exercises are used to encourage creative student initiative and systems thinking.

Subjects

solid mechanics | solid mechanics | engineering design | engineering design | open ended exercises | open ended exercises | matrix analysis of structures | matrix analysis of structures | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | static equilibrium | static equilibrium | force resultants | force resultants | support conditions | support conditions | determinate planar structures | determinate planar structures | beams | beams | trusses | trusses | frames | frames | stress | stress | strain | strain | shear | shear | bending | bending | torsion | torsion | matrix methods | matrix methods | elastic stability | elastic stability | design exercises | design exercises | interactive exercises | interactive exercises | systems thinking | systems thinking

License

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13.10J Structural Mechanics (MIT)

Description

Fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Residual stresses. Thermal effects. Analysis of beams, columns, tensioned beams, trusses, frames, cables, and shafts of general shape and material, including composites. Elastic buckling of columns. Exact and approximate methods, energy methods, principle of virtual work, introduction to computational structural mechanics. Examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures.

Subjects

structural mechanics | mechanical structures | residual stresses | thermal effects | beams | columns | tensioned beams | trusses | frames | arches | cables | shafts | elastic buckling | energy methods | virtual work | computational structural mechanics | 1.573J | 13.10 | 1.573

License

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

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2.080J Structural Mechanics (13.10J) (MIT)

Description

Fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Residual stresses. Thermal effects. Analysis of beams, columns, tensioned beams, trusses, frames, cables, and shafts of general shape and material, including composites. Elastic buckling of columns. Exact and approximate methods, energy methods, principle of virtual work, introduction to computational structural mechanics. Examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.10J. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanical Engineering), and this course was renumbered 2.080J.

Subjects

structural mechanics | mechanical structures | residual stresses | thermal effects | beams | columns | tensioned beams | trusses | frames | arches | cables | shafts | elastic buckling | energy methods | virtual work | computational structural mechanics | 13.10J | 13.10 | 1.573

License

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2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids II (MIT) 2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids II (MIT)

Description

This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course. This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course.

Subjects

linear static analysis | linear static analysis | solids | solids | structures | structures | nonlinear static analysis | nonlinear static analysis | heat transfer | heat transfer | fluid flows | fluid flows | finite element methods | finite element methods | ADINA | ADINA | student work | student work | beams | beams | plates | plates | shells | shells | displacement | displacement | conduction | conduction | convection | convection | radiation | radiation | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | incompressible fluids | incompressible fluids | acoustic fluids | acoustic fluids

License

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1.050 Solid Mechanics (MIT) 1.050 Solid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and methods of structural mechanics. Topics covered include: static equilibrium, force resultants, support conditions, analysis of determinate planar structures (beams, trusses, frames), stresses and strains in structural elements, states of stress (shear, bending, torsion), statically indeterminate systems, displacements and deformations, introduction to matrix methods, elastic stability, and approximate methods. Design exercises are used to encourage creative student initiative and systems thinking.Technical RequirementsJava® Virtual Machine software (automatically installed in most major web browsers) is required to run the .class files found on this course site. Java® plug-in software is required to run the This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and methods of structural mechanics. Topics covered include: static equilibrium, force resultants, support conditions, analysis of determinate planar structures (beams, trusses, frames), stresses and strains in structural elements, states of stress (shear, bending, torsion), statically indeterminate systems, displacements and deformations, introduction to matrix methods, elastic stability, and approximate methods. Design exercises are used to encourage creative student initiative and systems thinking.Technical RequirementsJava® Virtual Machine software (automatically installed in most major web browsers) is required to run the .class files found on this course site. Java® plug-in software is required to run the

Subjects

elastic stability | elastic stability | matrix methods | matrix methods | statically indeterminate systems | statically indeterminate systems | torsion | torsion | bending | bending | shearing | shearing | strains in structural elements | strains in structural elements | stress | stress | beams | beams | frames | frames | determinate planar structures | determinate planar structures | support conditions | support conditions | static equilibrium | static equilibrium

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.080J Structural Mechanics (13.10J) (MIT)

Description

Fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Residual stresses. Thermal effects. Analysis of beams, columns, tensioned beams, trusses, frames, cables, and shafts of general shape and material, including composites. Elastic buckling of columns. Exact and approximate methods, energy methods, principle of virtual work, introduction to computational structural mechanics. Examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.10J. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanical Engineering), and this course was renumbered 2.080J.

Subjects

structural mechanics | mechanical structures | residual stresses | thermal effects | beams | columns | tensioned beams | trusses | frames | arches | cables | shafts | elastic buckling | energy methods | virtual work | computational structural mechanics | 13.10J | 13.10 | 1.573

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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