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24.729 Topics in Philosophy of Language: Modeling Representation (MIT) 24.729 Topics in Philosophy of Language: Modeling Representation (MIT)

Description

The seminar will be devoted to understanding what we're up to when we ascribe contents to a person's assertions and mental attitudes. We seek to make clear the rules of the game for the philosophy of language. We'll survey classic discussions of the issue by Field, Lewis and Stalnaker. But much of the emphasis of the class will be on getting clear about the limitations of our theoretical tools. I'd like to focus on places where our theorizing runs into trouble, or breaks down altogether. The seminar will be devoted to understanding what we're up to when we ascribe contents to a person's assertions and mental attitudes. We seek to make clear the rules of the game for the philosophy of language. We'll survey classic discussions of the issue by Field, Lewis and Stalnaker. But much of the emphasis of the class will be on getting clear about the limitations of our theoretical tools. I'd like to focus on places where our theorizing runs into trouble, or breaks down altogether.

Subjects

radical interpretation | radical interpretation | mathematical truth | mathematical truth | self-location | self-location | degrees of belief | degrees of belief | incoherent belief | incoherent belief | language of thought | language of thought | representation system | representation system | modeling representation | modeling representation | intentionality | intentionality | philosophy of language | philosophy of language | Putnam's paradox | Putnam's paradox | semantics | semantics | logical omniscience | logical omniscience | epistemology | epistemology | knowledge argument | knowledge argument

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of "Feelings'' (MIT) 9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of "Feelings'' (MIT)

Description

Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting or as values are to beliefs and practices. Subject considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts. Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting or as values are to beliefs and practices. Subject considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.

Subjects

Affect | Affect | cognition | cognition | behavior | behavior | feeling | feeling | thinking | thinking | acting | acting | values | values | beliefs | beliefs | practices | practices | relations | relations | organization | organization | neurobiology | neurobiology | sociocultural | sociocultural | Psychology | Psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Why study Ibn Taymiyya? Why study Ibn Taymiyya?

Description

Ibn Taymiyya (1263-1328 C.E.) was an Islamic thinker who has exerted, and continues to exert, an enormous influence within Islamic thought. Taymiyya was often quoted by the late Osama Bin Laden and in this video, Jon Hoover, who has made a study of him and his importance in Islam, introduces Taymiyya and his thoughts. Ibn Taymiyya (1263-1328 C.E.) was an Islamic thinker who has exerted, and continues to exert, an enormous influence within Islamic thought. Taymiyya was often quoted by the late Osama Bin Laden and in this video, Jon Hoover, who has made a study of him and his importance in Islam, introduces Taymiyya and his thoughts.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | God | God | Koran | Koran | Islam | Islam | Moslems | Moslems | Arabic | Arabic | Religion | Religion | theology | theology | belief | belief | Qur'an | Qur'an

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Why study Orthodox Christianity? Why study Orthodox Christianity?

Description

Most English-speakers, when they think of Christianity, think only of its Latin, western forms, be they Catholic or Protestant. But this is only half the story: there are also all the churches of the East, often collectively referred to as ‘the Orthodox’. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them. Most English-speakers, when they think of Christianity, think only of its Latin, western forms, be they Catholic or Protestant. But this is only half the story: there are also all the churches of the East, often collectively referred to as ‘the Orthodox’. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Orthodoxy | Orthodoxy | Christianity | Christianity | God | God | Jesus | Jesus | church | church | religion | religion | theology | theology | belief | belief | Greek | Greek

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Why study systematic theology? : with Karen Kilby in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin Why study systematic theology? : with Karen Kilby in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin

Description

In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr Karen Kilby, an expert in systematic theology, explains what is meant by ‘systematics’ within the field of theology, and how it emerges out of the questions that believers ask in seeking to make sense of their faith. In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr Karen Kilby, an expert in systematic theology, explains what is meant by ‘systematics’ within the field of theology, and how it emerges out of the questions that believers ask in seeking to make sense of their faith.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | meaning | meaning | religion | religion | questions | questions | faith | faith | belief | belief | reason | reason | systematics | systematics

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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O papel dos orixás no Candomblé

Description

This illustrated podcast in Portuguese was created by Emilia Kropowska, a student of Spanish and Latin American Studies at the School of Languages and Area Studies, University of Portsmouth, as a part of a research project entitled 'The Role of Student Audio Casting and Production in the Language Learning Curriculum'. The recording is based on the student's own original research carried out in Brazil and is based on an interview with a filha-do-santo, or initiate, Mônica Baptista Costa. Mônica explains the role of orixás in the Afro-Brazilian religion of Candomblé, which was brought to Brazil during the era of slavery, and which has since become one of Brazil's major religions. Orixás play a pivotal role in Candomblé ritual and belief; they are intermediaries between human beings

Subjects

candomblé exú orixás orixá brazil brasil brazilian belief theology culture history language portuguese africa latin america syncretism custom religion belief | related subjects | R000

License

Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/

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5.2 The Traditional Analysis of Knowledge

Description

Part 5.2. Explores the idea of conscious and unconscious knowledge (should a person know that they know something or does it not matter?) and the theory of justification of propositions and beliefs. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

epistemology | scepticism | knowledge | philosophy | ayer | skepticism | infinite regress | belief | epistemology | scepticism | knowledge | philosophy | ayer | skepticism | infinite regress | belief

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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5.3 Gettier and Other Complications

Description

Part 5.3. The difference between internalist and externalist accounts of knowledge; whether we need external factors to justify knowledge or whether internal accounts are sufficient, and the Gettier cases. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

epistemology | belief | gettier | philosophy | truth | knowledge | epistemology | belief | gettier | philosophy | truth | knowledge

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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5.4 Scepticism, Externalism and the Ethics of Belief

Description

Part 5.4. Looks at the role the concept of knowledge plays in life, the different levels of knowledge we require in certain contexts and the return of scepticism over knowledge. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

epistemology | descartes | knowledge | gettier | philosophy | belief | truth | moore | putnam | epistemology | descartes | knowledge | gettier | philosophy | belief | truth | moore | putnam

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.016 Writing and Rhetoric: Designing Meaning (MIT)

Description

This course takes rhetoric as a system for designing meaning that helps us understand complex situations and ideas, enlighten and persuade others to act, and thus reshape our world. We’ll study rhetoric systematically and empirically, both analyzing how it works on us as readers, and testing how we can make informed rhetorical choices as we design our own texts.

Subjects

rhetoric | meaning | persuasion | political speeches | debates | argument | political beliefs | cultural beliefs | policy | economics | oral presentation | writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

Examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs mainly through class discussions and participation in study groups. Regular homework assignments, occasional lectures and demonstrations. Examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs mainly through class discussions and participation in study groups. Regular homework assignments, occasional lectures and demonstrations.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | Psychology | Psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.438 Algorithms for Inference (MIT) 6.438 Algorithms for Inference (MIT)

Description

This is a graduate-level introduction to the principles of statistical inference with probabilistic models defined using graphical representations. The material in this course constitutes a common foundation for work in machine learning, signal processing, artificial intelligence, computer vision, control, and communication. Ultimately, the subject is about teaching you contemporary approaches to, and perspectives on, problems of statistical inference. This is a graduate-level introduction to the principles of statistical inference with probabilistic models defined using graphical representations. The material in this course constitutes a common foundation for work in machine learning, signal processing, artificial intelligence, computer vision, control, and communication. Ultimately, the subject is about teaching you contemporary approaches to, and perspectives on, problems of statistical inference.

Subjects

inference | inference | algorithm | algorithm | graphical model | graphical model | factor graph | factor graph | markov chain | markov chain | Gaussian model | Gaussian model | loopy belief propagation | loopy belief propagation | EM algorithm | EM algorithm | statistical inference | statistical inference | probabilistic graphical model | probabilistic graphical model | Hidden Markov model | Hidden Markov model | linear dynamical systems | linear dynamical systems | Sum-product algorithm | Sum-product algorithm | junction tree algorithm | junction tree algorithm | Forward-backward algorithm | Forward-backward algorithm | Kalman filtering | Kalman filtering | smoothing | smoothing | Variational method | Variational method | mean-field theory | mean-field theory | Min-sum algorithm | Min-sum algorithm | Viterbi algorithm | Viterbi algorithm | parameter estimation | parameter estimation | learning structure | learning structure

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT) 4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT)

Description

This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure. This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure.

Subjects

movies | movies | filmmaking | filmmaking | digital video | digital video | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | media | media | computerized editing | computerized editing | personal story | personal story | emotional art | emotional art | Fluxus | Fluxus | Bill Viola | Bill Viola | digital representation | digital representation | story trajectory | story trajectory | character development | character development | verisimilitude | verisimilitude | time-space continuity | time-space continuity | viewer identification | viewer identification | suspension of disbelief | suspension of disbelief | closure | closure | narrative cinema | narrative cinema | speculative biography | speculative biography | conceptual video | conceptual video | the fake | the fake | the remake | the remake | domestic ethnography | domestic ethnography

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT) 24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course. This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course.

Subjects

action | action | motivation | motivation | social psychology | social psychology | sociology | sociology | belief | belief | desire | desire | moral motivation | moral motivation | sympathy | sympathy | empathy | empathy | intention | intention | will | will | addiction | addiction | resolution | resolution | rationality | rationality | identification | identification | autonomy | autonomy | egoism | egoism | altruism | altruism | intentions | intentions | Humean theory of motivation | Humean theory of motivation | willing | willing | wanting | wanting | waiting | waiting | weakness | weakness | Akrasia | Akrasia | self-control | self-control | temptation | temptation | self-regulation | self-regulation | free will | free will | self-deception | self-deception | moral psychology | moral psychology | empirical work | empirical work | autism | autism | ethical judgment | ethical judgment | moral luck | moral luck | virtue | virtue

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT) 14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT)

Description

This course/workshop aims to provide an invigorating intellectual environment for graduate students and junior faculty who are interested in economic theory. We will discuss research ideas and explore topics in game theory and more broadly in economic theory. This course/workshop aims to provide an invigorating intellectual environment for graduate students and junior faculty who are interested in economic theory. We will discuss research ideas and explore topics in game theory and more broadly in economic theory.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | game theory | game theory | bargaining | bargaining | information | information | asymmetric | asymmetric | empirical | empirical | experimental | experimental | studies | studies | heterogeneous beliefs | heterogeneous beliefs | uncertainty | uncertainty | unawareness | unawareness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction

Description

This free course, Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction, examines the philosophical questions surrounding the mind. You will examine how beliefs have changed over the centuries and be able to contrast the views of Descartes with more modern ideas. First published on Wed, 27 Jan 2016 as Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction, examines the philosophical questions surrounding the mind. You will examine how beliefs have changed over the centuries and be able to contrast the views of Descartes with more modern ideas. First published on Wed, 27 Jan 2016 as Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | mind | mind | imagination | imagination | beliefs | beliefs | Descartes | Descartes | AA308_1 | AA308_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT) 14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena. This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect | prospect | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | economics | economics | behavior | behavior | preferences | preferences | cognition | cognition | trust | trust | vengence | vengence | impatience | impatience | impulsivity | impulsivity | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | reinforcement | reinforcement | classical conditioning | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | loss-aversion | over-confidence | over-confidence | self-serving biases | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | equilibrium | rational choice | rational choice | utility maximization | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | game theory | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.729 Topics in Philosophy of Language: Modeling Representation (MIT)

Description

The seminar will be devoted to understanding what we're up to when we ascribe contents to a person's assertions and mental attitudes. We seek to make clear the rules of the game for the philosophy of language. We'll survey classic discussions of the issue by Field, Lewis and Stalnaker. But much of the emphasis of the class will be on getting clear about the limitations of our theoretical tools. I'd like to focus on places where our theorizing runs into trouble, or breaks down altogether.

Subjects

radical interpretation | mathematical truth | self-location | degrees of belief | incoherent belief | language of thought | representation system | modeling representation | intentionality | philosophy of language | Putnam's paradox | semantics | logical omniscience | epistemology | knowledge argument

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values, and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and in-class activities complemented by participation in small study groups and completion of homework assignments. This course examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values, and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and in-class activities complemented by participation in small study groups and completion of homework assignments.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | psychology | psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics | self-esteem | self-esteem | aggression | aggression | social behavior | social behavior | cognition | cognition | attention | attention | emotion | emotion | motivation | motivation | personality behavior | personality behavior | interpersonal relationships | interpersonal relationships | human activity | human activity | physiological | physiological | neurological | neurological

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.68 Affect: Neurobiological, Psychological and Sociocultural Counterparts of "Feelings" (MIT) 9.68 Affect: Neurobiological, Psychological and Sociocultural Counterparts of "Feelings" (MIT)

Description

This course studies the relations of affect to cognition and behavior, feeling to thinking and acting, and values to beliefs and practices. These connections will be considered at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts. This course studies the relations of affect to cognition and behavior, feeling to thinking and acting, and values to beliefs and practices. These connections will be considered at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.

Subjects

Affect | Affect | cognition | cognition | behavior | behavior | feeling | feeling | thinking | thinking | acting | acting | values | values | beliefs | beliefs | practices | practices | relations | relations | organization | organization | neurobiology | neurobiology | sociocultural | sociocultural | psychology | psychology | stress | stress | ecological identity | ecological identity | human relationship with nature | human relationship with nature

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002X Foundations of World Culture II: World Literatures and Texts (MIT) 21L.002X Foundations of World Culture II: World Literatures and Texts (MIT)

Description

This class continues our study of the foundational texts of human culture, focusing on early modernity until the recent past. In many ways, this includes several questions such as: Why did these works achieve the fame and influence they achieved? How do they present what it means to be a human being? How do they describe the role of a member of a family, community, tradition, social class, gender? How do they distinguish between proper and improper behavior? How do they characterize the members of other groups? However, in several ways, these texts are also iconoclastic, breaking with centuries of established tradition to shed light on previously unexplored subjects, such as the status of women in society or the legacy of the colonial expansion of European countries. They also question wel This class continues our study of the foundational texts of human culture, focusing on early modernity until the recent past. In many ways, this includes several questions such as: Why did these works achieve the fame and influence they achieved? How do they present what it means to be a human being? How do they describe the role of a member of a family, community, tradition, social class, gender? How do they distinguish between proper and improper behavior? How do they characterize the members of other groups? However, in several ways, these texts are also iconoclastic, breaking with centuries of established tradition to shed light on previously unexplored subjects, such as the status of women in society or the legacy of the colonial expansion of European countries. They also question wel

Subjects

human culture | human culture | established traditions | established traditions | religious beliefs | religious beliefs | monarchical rule | monarchical rule | world literatures | world literatures

License

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Plato on tradition and belief Plato on tradition and belief

Description

How can we settle questions of morality or ethics? This free course, Plato on tradition and belief, explores Plato's dialogue, the Laches, to discover why Plato thought that we should look to reason, rather than tradition, to decide how we should live and what it means to be courageous. First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as Plato on tradition and belief. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 How can we settle questions of morality or ethics? This free course, Plato on tradition and belief, explores Plato's dialogue, the Laches, to discover why Plato thought that we should look to reason, rather than tradition, to decide how we should live and what it means to be courageous. First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as Plato on tradition and belief. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

History & The Arts | History & The Arts | Classical Studies | Classical Studies | AA100_2 | AA100_2 | Plato | Plato | tradition | tradition | belief | belief | Laches | Laches | morality | morality | ethics | ethics

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of Feelings (MIT) 9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of Feelings (MIT)

Description

Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting, or as values are to beliefs and practices. This course considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.In this class, diverse aspects of the current scientific paradigm which is based largely on a distrust of emotions is explored as well as other perspectives within a broader human-ecological context. Relevant issues are approached both experientially and theoretically through discussions in class and in study groups, and through field trips and assigned readings. Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting, or as values are to beliefs and practices. This course considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.In this class, diverse aspects of the current scientific paradigm which is based largely on a distrust of emotions is explored as well as other perspectives within a broader human-ecological context. Relevant issues are approached both experientially and theoretically through discussions in class and in study groups, and through field trips and assigned readings.

Subjects

Affect | Affect | cognition | cognition | behavior | behavior | feeling | feeling | thinking | thinking | acting | acting | values | values | beliefs | beliefs | practices | practices | relations | relations | organization | organization | neurobiology | neurobiology | sociocultural | sociocultural | Psychology | Psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

In this course we learn social psychology both theoretically and practically. We examine interpersonal and group dynamics, and explore how the thoughts, feelings and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. We experience the social interactions and personal reactions in the real social situations of the class. In this course we learn social psychology both theoretically and practically. We examine interpersonal and group dynamics, and explore how the thoughts, feelings and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. We experience the social interactions and personal reactions in the real social situations of the class.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | Psychology | Psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.098 Special Seminar in Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes (MIT) 15.098 Special Seminar in Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes (MIT)

Description

This seminar is intended for doctoral students and discusses topics in applied probability. This semester includes a variety of fields, namely statistical physics (local weak convergence and correlation decay), artificial intelligence (belief propagation algorithms), computer science (random K-SAT problem, coloring, average case complexity) and electrical engineering (low density parity check (LDPC) codes). This seminar is intended for doctoral students and discusses topics in applied probability. This semester includes a variety of fields, namely statistical physics (local weak convergence and correlation decay), artificial intelligence (belief propagation algorithms), computer science (random K-SAT problem, coloring, average case complexity) and electrical engineering (low density parity check (LDPC) codes).

Subjects

doctoral | doctoral | seminar | seminar | applied probability | applied probability | stochastic processes | stochastic processes | statistical physics | statistical physics | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | computer science | computer science | belief propagation algorithms | belief propagation algorithms | K-SAT problem | K-SAT problem | coloring | coloring | average case complexity | average case complexity | low density parity check codes | low density parity check codes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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