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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies? This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies?

Subjects

history | history | methodology | methodology | historian | historian | analysis | analysis | oral history | oral history | comparative history | comparative history | memory | memory | narrative | narrative | language | language | sources | sources | methods | methods | organization | organization | framing | framing | and style | and style | historical writing | historical writing | political history | political history | social history | social history | cultural history | cultural history | demographics | demographics | biographical writing | biographical writing | biography | biography | auto-biography | auto-biography | historical films | historical films | fiction | fiction | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | approach | approach | style | style | evidence | evidence | methodologies | methodologies | historical accounts | historical accounts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.310 Bestsellers: The Memoir (MIT) 21L.310 Bestsellers: The Memoir (MIT)

Description

What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions and others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will closely examine some recent memoirs: Tobias Wolff's This Boy's Life, Barack Obama's Dreams From My Father, Edwidge Danticat's Brother, I'm Dying, Ayaan Hirsi Ali's Infidel, and Alison Bechdel's Fun Home. Students will write two brief papers: a critical essay and an experiment in memoir.As a "Sampling," this class offers 6 units, with a strong emphasis on close reading, group discussion, focused writing, and research and presentation skills. What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions and others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will closely examine some recent memoirs: Tobias Wolff's This Boy's Life, Barack Obama's Dreams From My Father, Edwidge Danticat's Brother, I'm Dying, Ayaan Hirsi Ali's Infidel, and Alison Bechdel's Fun Home. Students will write two brief papers: a critical essay and an experiment in memoir.As a "Sampling," this class offers 6 units, with a strong emphasis on close reading, group discussion, focused writing, and research and presentation skills.

Subjects

life | life | memory | memory | memoirs | memoirs | biography | biography | autobiography | autobiography | Tobias Wolff | Tobias Wolff | Barack Obama | Barack Obama | Edwidge Danticat | Edwidge Danticat | Brother | Brother | Ayaan Hirsi Ali | Ayaan Hirsi Ali | Alison Bechdel | Alison Bechdel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.512 American Authors: Autobiography and Memoir (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: Autobiography and Memoir (MIT)

Description

What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel. What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel.

Subjects

American authors | American authors | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | autobiography | autobiography | biography | biography | memoir | memoir | family | family | American culture | American culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT) 21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT)

Description

This course explores the forms, contents, and contexts of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography which lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists. This course explores the forms, contents, and contexts of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography which lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists.

Subjects

world traditions in dance | world traditions in dance | American concert dance | American concert dance | gender | gender | autobiography | autobiography | Katherine Dunham | Katherine Dunham | Alvin Ailey | Alvin Ailey | Isadora Duncan | Isadora Duncan | Martha Graham | Martha Graham | George Balanchine | George Balanchine | American dance | American dance | choreography | choreography | WMN.472 | WMN.472

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | mysogyny | mysogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | musical | musical | corporeal | corporeal | visual | visual | spoken word | spoken word | literary | literary | American cultural imagery | American cultural imagery | African American | African American | cultural practices | cultural practices | material culture | material culture | performance studio | performance studio | hip hop style | hip hop style | rapping | rapping | break | break | breaking | breaking | beats | beats | dj | dj | dee jay | dee jay | turntables | turntables | mic | mic | mc | mc | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | sex | sex | feminist | feminist | electronica | electronica | mediated performance | mediated performance | anarchy | anarchy | commodity fetishism | commodity fetishism | globalization | globalization | whiteness | whiteness | realness | realness | journalism | journalism | criticism | criticism | autobiography | autobiography | black | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Brought to Book: Book History and the Idea of Literature

Description

Professor Paul Eggert, University of New South Wales, gives the 17th Annual D.F. McKenzie lecture on the subject of books and gives a case study of Henry Lawson, Australian author of Where the Billy Boils. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | bibliography | literary criticism | foucault | books | henry lawson | biography | literature | bibliography | literary criticism | foucault | books | henry lawson | biography | 2011-03-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Harriet Shelley - Letter to Eliza Westbrook, Shelley and her parents

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Harriet Shelley drowned herself in December 1816, aged twenty-one. Her body was recovered from the Serpentine on 10 December, and an inquest into the death of one 'Harriet Smith' was held the following day. Although her precise movements in the months leading up to her death are uncertain, it is clear that she was living away from home, that she had taken a lover, and that she was pregnant. This is Harriet's last letter. Muddled and full of self-recrimination, it reveals the nervous exhaustion and profound depression of her final days. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

harriet shelley | s ghost | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | journal | biography | history | s ghost | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | journal | biography | history | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Mary Shelley - Letter to Percy Bysshe Shelley

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley and Mary arrived back in London to face the almost universal disapproval of family and friends, and severe money problems. Shelley was now financially responsible for Mary and Claire as well as Harriet, who was heavily pregnant with their second child. Godwin refused to see him, but drew on his resources. Mary wrote this impassioned letter to Shelley when he was in hiding from his numerous creditors. They could meet only on Sundays, when it was illegal to make arrests for debt. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

journal | s ghost | biography | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | history | s ghost | biography | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | history

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley - Joint journal entry

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley and Mary eloped at 4.15 am on 28 July 1814, accompanied by Mary's step-sister Jane Clairmont. They were pursued by Mrs Godwin (Claire's mother), who caught up with them the following day at Calais, but failed to persuade them to return. On 2 August Shelley, Mary and Claire reached Paris, where they purchased this notebook. Shelley wrote up their dramatic flight from England, the stormy crossing (during which he began 'to reason upon death') and their arrival in France. Mary makes her first contribution to the journal by lightly completing a sentence: 'Mary was there. Shelley was also with me.' Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

journal | s ghost | biography | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | history | s ghost | biography | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | history | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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William Godwin: Memoirs of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Godwin's memoir of Mary Wollstonecraft has been called the first modern biography. At the time, however, its frankness and emotional candour provoked general outrage. Godwin did not hesitate to include the most painful and scandalous episodes in Mary's life: her brutal, drunken father; her affair with Gilbert Imlay and the birth of their illegitimate daughter, Fanny; her two suicide attempts; her unconventional religious faith; the ghastly details of her death. The poet Robert Southey joined the chorus of disapproval and condemned Godwin for 'stripping his dead wife naked'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

vindication of rights of women | bodleian | feminism | mary wollstonecraft | #greatwriters | s ghost | biography | shelley | godwin | s ghost | biography | shelley | godwin | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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A Florence Nightingale for the 21st Century

Description

From the 2010 Alumni Weekend. Marjorie Reeves Memorial lecture given in St Anne's College. Mark Bostridge, author of the first major biography of Florence Nightingale in 50 years talks about the great woman's life and character. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

s college | nursing | crimean war | florence nightingale | alumni | 2010 | biography | s college | nursing | crimean war | florence nightingale | alumni | 2010 | biography | 2010-09-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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A Florence Nightingale for the 21st Century

Description

From the 2010 Alumni Weekend. Marjorie Reeves Memorial lecture given in St Anne's College. Mark Bostridge, author of the first major biography of Florence Nightingale in 50 years talks about the great woman's life and character. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

s college | nursing | crimean war | florence nightingale | alumni | 2010 | biography | s college | nursing | crimean war | florence nightingale | alumni | 2010 | biography | 2010-09-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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s Impossible Life

Description

Renowned psychologist, literary critic and essayist Adam Phillips delivers a public lecture at Wolfson College on his work on 'Freud's Impossible Life'. The lecture is introduced by the College President, Hermione Lee. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

sigmund freud | oxford centre for life-writing | biography | sigmund freud | oxford centre for life-writing | biography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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: On Fibbing, Fact and Fabulation

Description

The first Weinrebe lecture in life-writing was given by Michèle Roberts, Emeritus Professor of Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia. The lecture is introduced by Professor Hermione Lee. In this lecture, Michèle Roberts offers a stimulating blend of moving personal accounts, and thought-provoking reflections on the theory of life-writing. Michèle Roberts is the author of twelve highly acclaimed novels, including The Looking Glass and Daughters of the House which won the WHSmith Literary Award and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Her memoir Paper Houses was BBC Radio 4's Book of the Week in June 2007. She has also published poetry and short stories, most recently collected in Mud- stories of sex and love (2010). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

life-writing | writing | #greatwriters | biography | fiction | life-writing | writing | #greatwriters | biography | fiction

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Where may truth lie? Fiction in memory, memory in fiction

Description

The award-winning author and memoirist Candia McWilliam attests to the edifying power of fiction and biography in the third lecture in the Weinrebe series from the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing. The award-winning author and memoirist Candia McWilliam attests to the edifying power of fiction and biography to help us see the world through the eyes of others, in the third lecture in the Weinrebe series from the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing. McWilliam overcame writer's block following a period of near-blindness brought on by the rare illness blepharospasm to write the Hawthornden Prize-winning memoir What to Look For in Winter. Wolfson College President and OCLW Director Hermione Lee, in her introduction to the lecture, described her voice as "subtle, original and sharp", and her memoir Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

fiction | #greatwriters | writing | life-writing | wolfson | biography | fiction | #greatwriters | writing | life-writing | wolfson | biography | 2012-02-14

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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What can I say? Secrets in fiction and biography

Description

Booker Prize winning novelist Alan Hollinghurst discusses fiction and biography in conversation with Hermione Lee at Wolfson College's Oxford Centre for Life-Writing (OCLW). Alan Hollinghurst gives an insight into the secrets of his fiction at Wolfson College's Oxford Centre for Life-Writing, speaking in conversation with College President and literary biographer Hermione Lee on the complex relationships between biographer and subject; lived experience and the attempt to record it, a subject he explores in his latest novel, The Stranger's Child. The conversation ranges over the changing attitudes to privacy charted through the historical span of the novel, the parallel liberation of biography and gay writing over the same period, the fallibility of the novelist's primary tool - memory Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | gay literature | creative | life-writing | writing | biography | #greatwriters | gay literature | creative | life-writing | writing | biography | 2012-02-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Senses of Reality: Writing the Biography of a Revolutionary Generation

Description

The annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture given at Wolfson College on May 27th 2010. Roy Foster is Carroll Professor of Irish History at Hertford College, Oxford. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

yeats | revolution | biography | irish history | #greatwriters | yeats | revolution | biography | irish history | #greatwriters | 2010-05-27

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT) 4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT)

Description

This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure. This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure.

Subjects

movies | movies | filmmaking | filmmaking | digital video | digital video | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | media | media | computerized editing | computerized editing | personal story | personal story | emotional art | emotional art | Fluxus | Fluxus | Bill Viola | Bill Viola | digital representation | digital representation | story trajectory | story trajectory | character development | character development | verisimilitude | verisimilitude | time-space continuity | time-space continuity | viewer identification | viewer identification | suspension of disbelief | suspension of disbelief | closure | closure | narrative cinema | narrative cinema | speculative biography | speculative biography | conceptual video | conceptual video | the fake | the fake | the remake | the remake | domestic ethnography | domestic ethnography

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century. This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century.

Subjects

historical writing | historical writing | politics | politics | social | social | culture | culture | demographics | demographics | biography | biography | environment | environment | comparative literature | comparative literature | film | film | fiction | fiction | memoir | memoir | methodology | methodology | political | political | cultural | cultural | demographic | demographic | biographical | biographical | comparative | comparative | historical films | historical films | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | methods | methods | historians | historians | interpretation | interpretation | archives | archives | archivists | archivists | archival findings | archival findings | history | history | national identity | national identity | philosophy of history | philosophy of history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.006 American Literature (MIT) 21L.006 American Literature (MIT)

Description

This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison. This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subjects

novel | novel | literature | literature | poetry | poetry | America | America | American | American | independence | independence | Melville | Melville | Twain | Twain | Morrison | Morrison | realism | realism | satire | satire | history | history | biography | biography | Emerson | Emerson | Hawthorne | Hawthorne | Thoreau | Thoreau | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Dickinson | Dickinson | Wharton | Wharton | Hurston | Hurston | Rowlandson | Rowlandson | Douglass | Douglass

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.458 The Bible (MIT) 21L.458 The Bible (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to major books from both the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Particular attention has been given to literary techniques, issues resulting from translation from the original Hebrew and Greek, and the different historical periods that produced and are reflected in the Bible. Investigation of the Bible as influence in later narrative, philosophic, and artistic traditions. This course is an introduction to major books from both the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Particular attention has been given to literary techniques, issues resulting from translation from the original Hebrew and Greek, and the different historical periods that produced and are reflected in the Bible. Investigation of the Bible as influence in later narrative, philosophic, and artistic traditions.

Subjects

bible | bible | genesis | genesis | exodus | exodus | leviticus | leviticus | numbers | numbers | deuteronomy | deuteronomy | samuel | samuel | kings | kings | isaiah | isaiah | job | job | daniel | daniel | synoptic gospels | synoptic gospels | mark | mark | matthew | matthew | luke | luke | john | john | acts of the apostles | acts of the apostles | pauline epistles | pauline epistles | galatians | galatians | romans | romans | revelation | revelation | god | god | lord | lord | jesus | jesus | literary technique | literary technique | myth | myth | history | history | genealogy | genealogy | poetry prophecy | poetry prophecy | biography | biography

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT) 21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT)

Description

This course explores the forms, contents, and context of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, Pearl Primus, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography that lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists. This course explores the forms, contents, and context of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, Pearl Primus, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography that lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists.

Subjects

WGS.591 | WGS.591 | world traditions in dance | world traditions in dance | American concert dance | American concert dance | gender | gender | autobiography | autobiography | Katherine Dunham | Katherine Dunham | Alvin Ailey | Alvin Ailey | Isadora Duncan | Isadora Duncan | Martha Graham | Martha Graham | George Balanchine | George Balanchine | American dance | American dance | choreography | choreography | race | race | sex | sex | student work | student work

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT) Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films. This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films.

Subjects

Latina | Latina | women | women | code-switching | code-switching | first generation | first generation | coming-of-age | coming-of-age | Chicana | Chicana | roots | roots | revolution | revolution | politics | politics | poverty | | poverty | | social criticism | social criticism | kinship | kinship | biography | biography | magic realism | magic realism | mythical historicism | mythical historicism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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