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22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT) 22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT)

Description

The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi

Subjects

Interaction of radiation with biological material | Interaction of radiation with biological material | how different types of radiation deposit energy | how different types of radiation deposit energy | secondary radiations | secondary radiations | how radiation affects cells | how radiation affects cells | biological effects | biological effects | effects of radiation on biological systems | effects of radiation on biological systems | DNA damage | DNA damage | in vitro cell survival models | in vitro cell survival models | in vivo mammalian systems | in vivo mammalian systems | radiation therapy | radiation therapy | radiation syndromes in humans | radiation syndromes in humans | carcinogenesis | carcinogenesis | Environmental radiation sources | Environmental radiation sources | radiation protection | radiation protection | cells | cells | tissues | tissues | radiation interactions | radiation interactions | radiation chemistry | radiation chemistry | LET | LET | tracks | tracks | chromosome damags | chromosome damags | in vivo | in vivo | in vitro | in vitro | cell survival curves | cell survival curves | dose response | dose response | RBE | RBE | clustered damage | clustered damage | radiation response | radiation response | tumor kinetics | tumor kinetics | tumor radiobiology | tumor radiobiology | fractionation | fractionation | protons | protons | alpha particles | alpha particles | whole body exposure | whole body exposure | chronic exposure | chronic exposure | space | space | microbeams | microbeams | radon | radon | background radiation | background radiation | 22.55 | 22.55 | HST.560 | HST.560

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20.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (BE.010J) (MIT) 20.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (BE.010J) (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element video. Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the undergraduate Engineering degree programs. The beginning lectures describe the science basis for bioengineering with particular emphasis on molecular cell biology and systems biology. Bioengineering faculty will then describe the bioengineering options in a particular engineering course as well as the type of research conducted by faculty in the department. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element video. Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the undergraduate Engineering degree programs. The beginning lectures describe the science basis for bioengineering with particular emphasis on molecular cell biology and systems biology. Bioengineering faculty will then describe the bioengineering options in a particular engineering course as well as the type of research conducted by faculty in the department.

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | bioengineering | bioengineering | biomems | biomems | biomaterials | biomaterials | biomechanical engineering | biomechanical engineering | biology | biology | engineering | engineering | bioprocessing | bioprocessing | biological materials | biological materials | biological engineers | biological engineers

License

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BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (MIT) BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (MIT)

Description

Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the undergraduate Engineering degree programs. The beginning lectures describe the science basis for bioengineering with particular emphasis on molecular cell biology and systems biology. Bioengineering faculty will then describe the bioengineering options in a particular engineering course as well as the type of research conducted by faculty in the department.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm, .mp3. Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the undergraduate Engineering degree programs. The beginning lectures describe the science basis for bioengineering with particular emphasis on molecular cell biology and systems biology. Bioengineering faculty will then describe the bioengineering options in a particular engineering course as well as the type of research conducted by faculty in the department.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm, .mp3.

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | bioengineering | bioengineering | biomems | biomems | biomaterials | biomaterials | biomechanical engineering | biomechanical engineering | biology | biology | engineering | engineering | bioprocessing | bioprocessing | biological materials | biological materials | biological engineers | biological engineers

License

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BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (MIT) BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (MIT)

Description

Designed as a freshmen seminar course, faculty from various School of Engineering departments describe the bioengineering research and educational opportunities specific to and offered by their departments. Background lectures by the BE.010J staff introduce students to the fundamental scientific basis for bioengineering. Specially produced videos provide additional background information that is supplemented with readings from newspaper and magazine articles.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player is required to run the .rm files found in this course. Designed as a freshmen seminar course, faculty from various School of Engineering departments describe the bioengineering research and educational opportunities specific to and offered by their departments. Background lectures by the BE.010J staff introduce students to the fundamental scientific basis for bioengineering. Specially produced videos provide additional background information that is supplemented with readings from newspaper and magazine articles.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player is required to run the .rm files found in this course.

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | bioengineering | bioengineering | biomems | biomems | biomaterials | biomaterials | biomechanical engineering | biomechanical engineering | biology | biology | engineering | engineering | bioprocessing | bioprocessing | biological materials | biological materials | biological engineers | biological engineers | BE.010 | BE.010 | 2.790 | 2.790 | 6.025 | 6.025 | 7.38 | 7.38 | 10.010 | 10.010

License

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7.342 Cell-material Crosstalk: Engineering Cell-Instructive Biomaterials (MIT) 7.342 Cell-material Crosstalk: Engineering Cell-Instructive Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

Biomaterials are substances that have been designed to direct the course of any therapeutic or diagnostic procedure by controlling interactions with biological systems. A large toolbox of non-biological materials has been engineered to study cell behavior at the cell-material interface. In this course, we will examine how this interface can be leveraged to study cellular systems and generate novel therapeutics. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong int Biomaterials are substances that have been designed to direct the course of any therapeutic or diagnostic procedure by controlling interactions with biological systems. A large toolbox of non-biological materials has been engineered to study cell behavior at the cell-material interface. In this course, we will examine how this interface can be leveraged to study cellular systems and generate novel therapeutics. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong int

Subjects

Biomaterials | Biomaterials | cell-material interface | cell-material interface | biology | biology | engineering | engineering | cell behavior | cell behavior | substrate materials | substrate materials | biological processes | biological processes | nonbiological materials | nonbiological materials | Mechanobiology | Mechanobiology | Biomimetic signaling | Biomimetic signaling | Nanoparticles | Nanoparticles

License

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20.109 Laboratory Fundamentals in Biological Engineering (MIT) 20.109 Laboratory Fundamentals in Biological Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course introduces experimental biochemical and molecular techniques from a quantitative engineering perspective. Experimental design, rigorous data analysis, and scientific communication form the underpinnings of this subject. Three discovery-based experimental modules focus on genome engineering, expression engineering, and biomaterial engineering.This OCW site is based on the source OpenWetWare class Wiki, found at 20.109(F07): Laboratory Fundamentals of Biological Engineering. This course introduces experimental biochemical and molecular techniques from a quantitative engineering perspective. Experimental design, rigorous data analysis, and scientific communication form the underpinnings of this subject. Three discovery-based experimental modules focus on genome engineering, expression engineering, and biomaterial engineering.This OCW site is based on the source OpenWetWare class Wiki, found at 20.109(F07): Laboratory Fundamentals of Biological Engineering.

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | biology | biology | bioengineering | bioengineering | DNA | DNA | PCR | PCR | RNA | RNA | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | systems engineering | systems engineering | DNA engineering | DNA engineering | protein engineering | protein engineering | bio-material engineering | bio-material engineering | restriction map | restriction map | lipofection | lipofection | screening library | screening library | bacterial photography | bacterial photography | device characterization | device characterization | biological parts | biological parts | openwetware | openwetware

License

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20.109 Laboratory Fundamentals in Biological Engineering (MIT) 20.109 Laboratory Fundamentals in Biological Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course introduces experimental biochemical and molecular techniques from a quantitative engineering perspective. Rigorous quantitative data collection, statistical analysis, and conceptual understanding of instrumentation design and application form the underpinnings of this course. The four discovery based modules include DNA Engineering, Protein Engineering, Systems Engineering, and Biomaterials Engineering. Additional information is available on the course Wiki (hosted on OpenWetWare.) Teaching Fellows Reshma Shetty Maria Foley Eileen Higham Yoon Sung Nam This course introduces experimental biochemical and molecular techniques from a quantitative engineering perspective. Rigorous quantitative data collection, statistical analysis, and conceptual understanding of instrumentation design and application form the underpinnings of this course. The four discovery based modules include DNA Engineering, Protein Engineering, Systems Engineering, and Biomaterials Engineering. Additional information is available on the course Wiki (hosted on OpenWetWare.) Teaching Fellows Reshma Shetty Maria Foley Eileen Higham Yoon Sung Nam

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | biology | biology | bioengineering | bioengineering | DNA | DNA | PCR | PCR | RNA | RNA | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | systems engineering | systems engineering | DNA engineering | DNA engineering | protein engineering | protein engineering | bio-material engineering | bio-material engineering | restriction map | restriction map | lipofection | lipofection | screening library | screening library | bacterial photography | bacterial photography | device characterization | device characterization | biological parts | biological parts | openwetware | openwetware

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT) 6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university.  6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university. 

Subjects

information and entropy | information and entropy | computing | computing | communications | communications | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | digital signals and streams | codes | codes | compression | compression | noise | noise | probability | probability | reversible operations | reversible operations | irreversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | information in biological systems | channel capacity | channel capacity | aximum-entropy formalism | aximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | maximum-entropy formalism | maximum-entropy formalism | second law of thermodynamics | second law of thermodynamics | quantum computation | quantum computation | biological systems | biological systems | unified theory of information | unified theory of information | digital signals | digital signals | digital streams | digital streams | bits | bits | errors | errors | processes | processes | inference | inference | maximum entropy | maximum entropy | physical systems | physical systems | energy | energy | quantum information | quantum information | 6.050 | 6.050 | 2.110 | 2.110

License

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BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (MIT)

Description

Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the undergraduate Engineering degree programs. The beginning lectures describe the science basis for bioengineering with particular emphasis on molecular cell biology and systems biology. Bioengineering faculty will then describe the bioengineering options in a particular engineering course as well as the type of research conducted by faculty in the department.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm, .mp3.

Subjects

biological engineering | bioengineering | biomems | biomaterials | biomechanical engineering | biology | engineering | bioprocessing | biological materials | biological engineers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (MIT)

Description

Designed as a freshmen seminar course, faculty from various School of Engineering departments describe the bioengineering research and educational opportunities specific to and offered by their departments. Background lectures by the BE.010J staff introduce students to the fundamental scientific basis for bioengineering. Specially produced videos provide additional background information that is supplemented with readings from newspaper and magazine articles.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player is required to run the .rm files found in this course.

Subjects

biological engineering | bioengineering | biomems | biomaterials | biomechanical engineering | biology | engineering | bioprocessing | biological materials | biological engineers | BE.010 | 2.790 | 6.025 | 7.38 | 10.010

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (BE.010J) (MIT)

Description

Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the undergraduate Engineering degree programs. The beginning lectures describe the science basis for bioengineering with particular emphasis on molecular cell biology and systems biology. Bioengineering faculty will then describe the bioengineering options in a particular engineering course as well as the type of research conducted by faculty in the department.

Subjects

biological engineering | bioengineering | biomems | biomaterials | biomechanical engineering | biology | engineering | bioprocessing | biological materials | biological engineers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT)

Description

The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi

Subjects

Interaction of radiation with biological material | how different types of radiation deposit energy | secondary radiations | how radiation affects cells | biological effects | effects of radiation on biological systems | DNA damage | in vitro cell survival models | in vivo mammalian systems | radiation therapy | radiation syndromes in humans | carcinogenesis | Environmental radiation sources | radiation protection | cells | tissues | radiation interactions | radiation chemistry | LET | tracks | chromosome damags | in vivo | in vitro | cell survival curves | dose response | RBE | clustered damage | radiation response | tumor kinetics | tumor radiobiology | fractionation | protons | alpha particles | whole body exposure | chronic exposure | space | microbeams | radon | background radiation | 22.55 | HST.560

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (BE.010J) (MIT)

Description

Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the undergraduate Engineering degree programs. The beginning lectures describe the science basis for bioengineering with particular emphasis on molecular cell biology and systems biology. Bioengineering faculty will then describe the bioengineering options in a particular engineering course as well as the type of research conducted by faculty in the department.

Subjects

biological engineering | bioengineering | biomems | biomaterials | biomechanical engineering | biology | engineering | bioprocessing | biological materials | biological engineers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.010J Introduction to Bioengineering (BE.010J) (MIT)

Description

Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the undergraduate Engineering degree programs. The beginning lectures describe the science basis for bioengineering with particular emphasis on molecular cell biology and systems biology. Bioengineering faculty will then describe the bioengineering options in a particular engineering course as well as the type of research conducted by faculty in the department.

Subjects

biological engineering | bioengineering | biomems | biomaterials | biomechanical engineering | biology | engineering | bioprocessing | biological materials | biological engineers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT)

Description

The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi

Subjects

Interaction of radiation with biological material | how different types of radiation deposit energy | secondary radiations | how radiation affects cells | biological effects | effects of radiation on biological systems | DNA damage | in vitro cell survival models | in vivo mammalian systems | radiation therapy | radiation syndromes in humans | carcinogenesis | Environmental radiation sources | radiation protection | cells | tissues | radiation interactions | radiation chemistry | LET | tracks | chromosome damags | in vivo | in vitro | cell survival curves | dose response | RBE | clustered damage | radiation response | tumor kinetics | tumor radiobiology | fractionation | protons | alpha particles | whole body exposure | chronic exposure | space | microbeams | radon | background radiation | 22.55 | HST.560

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 Photosynthesis: Life from Light (MIT) 7.343 Photosynthesis: Life from Light (MIT)

Description

In this course, you will journey through the web of physical, chemical, and biological reactions that collectively constitute photosynthesis. We will begin with light harvesting and follow photons to the sites of primary photochemistry: the photoreaction centers. A molecular-scale view will show in atomic detail how these protein complexes capture and energize electrons. Then we will follow the multiple pathways electrons take as they carry out their work. Consequent reactions, such as the synthesis of ATP and the reduction of CO2 during the synthesis of carbohydrates, will also be discussed in structural detail. Lastly, we will delve into the evolution of these systems and also discuss other photosynthetic strategies, such as light-driven proton pumps and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The co In this course, you will journey through the web of physical, chemical, and biological reactions that collectively constitute photosynthesis. We will begin with light harvesting and follow photons to the sites of primary photochemistry: the photoreaction centers. A molecular-scale view will show in atomic detail how these protein complexes capture and energize electrons. Then we will follow the multiple pathways electrons take as they carry out their work. Consequent reactions, such as the synthesis of ATP and the reduction of CO2 during the synthesis of carbohydrates, will also be discussed in structural detail. Lastly, we will delve into the evolution of these systems and also discuss other photosynthetic strategies, such as light-driven proton pumps and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The co

Subjects

photosynthesis | photosynthesis | life from light | life from light | conversion | conversion | solar energy | solar energy | chemical energy | chemical energy | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles | global warming | global warming | physical | physical | chemical and biological reactions | chemical and biological reactions | light harvesting | light harvesting | photochemistry | photochemistry | protein complexes | protein complexes | synthesis of ATP | synthesis of ATP | reduction of CO2 | reduction of CO2 | carbohydrates | carbohydrates | light-driven proton pumps | light-driven proton pumps | anoxygenic photosynthesis | anoxygenic photosynthesis

License

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SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT) SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family. This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family.

Subjects

women's studies | women's studies | gender | gender | transsexual | transsexual | women's movement | women's movement | women's rights | women's rights | declaration of independence | declaration of independence | madness | madness | illness | illness | patriarchy | patriarchy | female pathology | female pathology | socialization | socialization | ethnicity | ethnicity | race | race | gender roles | gender roles | social construction | social construction | biological essentialism | biological essentialism | embodiment | embodiment | body image | body image | representation of women | representation of women | sexuality | sexuality | reproductive politics | reproductive politics | work | work | violence | violence | feminism | feminism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.349 Biological Computing: At the Crossroads of Engineering and Science (MIT) 7.349 Biological Computing: At the Crossroads of Engineering and Science (MIT)

Description

Imagine you are a salesman needing to visit 100 cities connected by a set of roads. Can you do it while stopping in each city only once? Even a supercomputer working at 1 trillion operations per second would take longer than the age of the universe to find a solution when considering each possibility in turn. In 1994, Leonard Adleman published a paper in which he described a solution, using the tools of molecular biology, for a smaller 7-city example of this problem. His paper generated enormous scientific and public interest, and kick-started the field of Biological Computing, the main subject of this discussion based seminar course. Students will analyze the Adleman paper, and the papers that preceded and followed it, with an eye for identifying the engineering and scientific aspects of Imagine you are a salesman needing to visit 100 cities connected by a set of roads. Can you do it while stopping in each city only once? Even a supercomputer working at 1 trillion operations per second would take longer than the age of the universe to find a solution when considering each possibility in turn. In 1994, Leonard Adleman published a paper in which he described a solution, using the tools of molecular biology, for a smaller 7-city example of this problem. His paper generated enormous scientific and public interest, and kick-started the field of Biological Computing, the main subject of this discussion based seminar course. Students will analyze the Adleman paper, and the papers that preceded and followed it, with an eye for identifying the engineering and scientific aspects of

Subjects

biological computing | biological computing | Leonard Adleman | Leonard Adleman | exquisite detection | exquisite detection | whole-cell computing | whole-cell computing | computation | computation | molecular biology | molecular biology | biotin-avidin | biotin-avidin | magnetic beads | magnetic beads | cellular processes | cellular processes | combinatorial problems | combinatorial problems | self-assembly | self-assembly | nanodevices | nanodevices | molecular machines | molecular machines | quorum sensing | quorum sensing | molecular switches | molecular switches | ciliates | ciliates | molecular gates | molecular gates | molecular circuits | molecular circuits | genetic switch | genetic switch | cellular networks | cellular networks | genetic networks | genetic networks | genetic circuits | genetic circuits

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT) 7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials. Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | nucleic acids | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | genetics | genetics | genes | genes | genetic material | genetic material | double helix | double helix | molecular biology | molecular biology | biotechnology | biotechnology | structure | structure | function | function | heredity | heredity | complementarity | complementarity | biological materials | biological materials | genetic code | genetic code | oligonucleotides | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | polyribosome | tRNA | tRNA | reverse transcription | reverse transcription | central dogma | central dogma | transcription | transcription

License

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HST.950J Engineering Biomedical Information: From Bioinformatics to Biosurveillance (MIT) HST.950J Engineering Biomedical Information: From Bioinformatics to Biosurveillance (MIT)

Description

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the technological advances in biomedical informatics and their applications at the intersection of computer science and biomedical research. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the technological advances in biomedical informatics and their applications at the intersection of computer science and biomedical research.

Subjects

biomedical informatics | biomedical informatics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | biomedical research | biomedical research | biological computing | biological computing | biomedical computing | biomedical computing | computational genomics | computational genomics | genomics | genomics | microarrays | microarrays | proteomics | proteomics | pharmacogenomics | pharmacogenomics | genomic privacy | genomic privacy | clinical informatics | clinical informatics | biosurveillance | biosurveillance | privacy | privacy | biotechnology | biotechnology

License

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT) 6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation, with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include: information and computation, digital signals, codes and compression, applications such as biological representations of information, logic circuits, computer architectures, and algorithmic information, noise, probability, error correction, reversible and irreversible operations, physics of computation, and quantum computation. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation, with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include: information and computation, digital signals, codes and compression, applications such as biological representations of information, logic circuits, computer architectures, and algorithmic information, noise, probability, error correction, reversible and irreversible operations, physics of computation, and quantum computation. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics.

Subjects

information and entropy | information and entropy | computing | computing | communications | communications | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | digital signals and streams | codes | codes | compression | compression | noise | noise | probability | probability | reversible operations | reversible operations | irreversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | information in biological systems | channel capacity | channel capacity | maximum-entropy formalism | maximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation

License

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy. This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

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3.052 Nanomechanics of Materials and Biomaterials (MIT) 3.052 Nanomechanics of Materials and Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the latest scientific developments and discoveries in the field of nanomechanics, the study of forces and motion on extremely tiny (10-9 m) areas of synthetic and biological materials and structures. At this level, mechanical properties are intimately related to chemistry, physics, and quantum mechanics. Most lectures will consist of a theoretical component that will then be compared to recent experimental data (case studies) in the literature. The course begins with a series of introductory lectures that describes the normal and lateral forces acting at the atomic scale. The following discussions include experimental techniques in high resolution force spectroscopy, atomistic aspects of adhesion, nanoindentation, molecular details of fracture, chemical force microsc This course focuses on the latest scientific developments and discoveries in the field of nanomechanics, the study of forces and motion on extremely tiny (10-9 m) areas of synthetic and biological materials and structures. At this level, mechanical properties are intimately related to chemistry, physics, and quantum mechanics. Most lectures will consist of a theoretical component that will then be compared to recent experimental data (case studies) in the literature. The course begins with a series of introductory lectures that describes the normal and lateral forces acting at the atomic scale. The following discussions include experimental techniques in high resolution force spectroscopy, atomistic aspects of adhesion, nanoindentation, molecular details of fracture, chemical force microsc

Subjects

biology | biology | biological engineering | biological engineering | cells | cells | AFM | AFM | atomic force microscope | atomic force microscope | nanoindentation | nanoindentation | gecko | gecko | malaria | malaria | nanotube | nanotube | collagen | collagen | polymer | polymer | seashell | seashell | biomimetics | biomimetics | molecule | molecule | atomic | atomic | bonding | bonding | adhesion | adhesion | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | physics | physics | chemistry | chemistry | protein | protein | DNA | DNA | bone | bone | lipid | lipid

License

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3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT) 3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT)

Description

Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components. Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components.

Subjects

Linear elastic | Linear elastic | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | Microstructural effects on fracture | Microstructural effects on fracture | Toughening mechanisms | Toughening mechanisms | Crack growth resistance | Crack growth resistance | creep fracture | creep fracture | Interface fracture mechanics | Interface fracture mechanics | Fatigue damage | Fatigue damage | dislocation substructures | dislocation substructures | Variable amplitude fatigue | Variable amplitude fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | experimental methods | experimental methods | microstructural effects | microstructural effects | metals | metals | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | thin films | thin films | biological materials | biological materials | composites | composites | single crystals | single crystals | stress-life | stress-life | strain-life | strain-life | structural components | structural components | bioimplant components | bioimplant components | microelectronic components | microelectronic components | case studies | case studies

License

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT) STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives. This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | Social | study | study | science | science | technology | technology | interdisciplinary field | interdisciplinary field | social practice | social practice | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | sociology | sociology | scientific institutions | scientific institutions | knowledge | knowledge | anthropology | anthropology | feminism | feminism | critical race theory | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | post-colonial studies | queer theory | queer theory | human culture | human culture | politics | politics | theories | theories | methods | methods | reproduction | reproduction | social reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

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