Searching for biomimetic : 24 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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3.A26 Freshman Seminar: The Nature of Engineering (MIT) 3.A26 Freshman Seminar: The Nature of Engineering (MIT)

Description

Are you interested in investigating how nature engineers itself? How engineers copy the shapes found in nature ("biomimetics")? This Freshman Seminar investigates why similar shapes occur in so many natural things and how physics changes the shape of nature. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? What is the wood science behind musical instruments? Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research and they have been the focus of investigation in this course for the past three years. Are you interested in investigating how nature engineers itself? How engineers copy the shapes found in nature ("biomimetics")? This Freshman Seminar investigates why similar shapes occur in so many natural things and how physics changes the shape of nature. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? What is the wood science behind musical instruments? Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research and they have been the focus of investigation in this course for the past three years.

Subjects

biomimicry | biomimicry | bird | bird | feather | feather | bone | bone | structure | structure | plant structure | plant structure | cellular solids | cellular solids | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | service learning | service learning | biomimetic research | biomimetic research | biomimetics | biomimetics | biology | biology | mimetic | mimetic | physics | physics | nature | nature | natural engineering | natural engineering | wood | wood | tree | tree | tree trunk | tree trunk

License

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2.A35 Biomimetic Principles and Design (MIT) 2.A35 Biomimetic Principles and Design (MIT)

Description

Biomimetics is based on the belief that nature, at least at times, is a good engineer. Biomimesis is the scientific method of learning new principles and processes based on systematic study, observation and experimentation with live animals and organisms. This Freshman Advising Seminar on the topic is a way for freshmen to explore some of MIT's richness and learn more about what they may want to study in later years. Biomimetics is based on the belief that nature, at least at times, is a good engineer. Biomimesis is the scientific method of learning new principles and processes based on systematic study, observation and experimentation with live animals and organisms. This Freshman Advising Seminar on the topic is a way for freshmen to explore some of MIT's richness and learn more about what they may want to study in later years.

Subjects

biomimetics | biomimetics | biomimicry | biomimicry | biomimesis | biomimesis | nature | nature | reverse engineering | reverse engineering | bionics | bionics | adaptation | adaptation | genetic algorithms | genetic algorithms | politics | politics | design | design | imitate | imitate | robot | robot | robotics | robotics | robotuna | robotuna | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | fish | fish | swim | swim | submarine | submarine | complexity | complexity

License

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3.052 Nanomechanics of Materials and Biomaterials (MIT) 3.052 Nanomechanics of Materials and Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the latest scientific developments and discoveries in the field of nanomechanics, the study of forces and motion on extremely tiny (10-9 m) areas of synthetic and biological materials and structures. At this level, mechanical properties are intimately related to chemistry, physics, and quantum mechanics. Most lectures will consist of a theoretical component that will then be compared to recent experimental data (case studies) in the literature. The course begins with a series of introductory lectures that describes the normal and lateral forces acting at the atomic scale. The following discussions include experimental techniques in high resolution force spectroscopy, atomistic aspects of adhesion, nanoindentation, molecular details of fracture, chemical force microsc This course focuses on the latest scientific developments and discoveries in the field of nanomechanics, the study of forces and motion on extremely tiny (10-9 m) areas of synthetic and biological materials and structures. At this level, mechanical properties are intimately related to chemistry, physics, and quantum mechanics. Most lectures will consist of a theoretical component that will then be compared to recent experimental data (case studies) in the literature. The course begins with a series of introductory lectures that describes the normal and lateral forces acting at the atomic scale. The following discussions include experimental techniques in high resolution force spectroscopy, atomistic aspects of adhesion, nanoindentation, molecular details of fracture, chemical force microsc

Subjects

biology | biology | biological engineering | biological engineering | cells | cells | AFM | AFM | atomic force microscope | atomic force microscope | nanoindentation | nanoindentation | gecko | gecko | malaria | malaria | nanotube | nanotube | collagen | collagen | polymer | polymer | seashell | seashell | biomimetics | biomimetics | molecule | molecule | atomic | atomic | bonding | bonding | adhesion | adhesion | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | physics | physics | chemistry | chemistry | protein | protein | DNA | DNA | bone | bone | lipid | lipid

License

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20.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (BE.442) (MIT) 20.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (BE.442) (MIT)

Description

This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi

Subjects

protein | protein | hydration | hydration | amino acid | amino acid | ECM | ECM | extracellular matrix | extracellular matrix | peptide | peptide | helix | helix | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | biomaterial | biomaterial | biotech | biotech | biotechnology | biotechnology | nanomaterial | nanomaterial | beta-sheet | beta-sheet | beta sheet | beta sheet | molecular structure | molecular structure | bioengineering | bioengineering | silk | silk | biomimetic | biomimetic | self-assembly | self-assembly | keratin | keratin | collagen | collagen | adhesive | adhesive | GFP | GFP | fluorescent | fluorescent | polymer | polymer | lipid | lipid

License

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3.A26 Freshman Seminar: The Nature of Engineering (MIT)

Description

Are you interested in investigating how nature engineers itself? How engineers copy the shapes found in nature ("biomimetics")? This Freshman Seminar investigates why similar shapes occur in so many natural things and how physics changes the shape of nature. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? What is the wood science behind musical instruments? Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research and they have been the focus of investigation in this course for the past three years.

Subjects

biomimicry | bird | feather | bone | structure | plant structure | cellular solids | freshman seminar | service learning | biomimetic research | biomimetics | biology | mimetic | physics | nature | natural engineering | wood | tree | tree trunk

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (MIT) BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (MIT)

Description

This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi

Subjects

protein | protein | hydration | hydration | amino acid | amino acid | ECM | ECM | extracellular matrix | extracellular matrix | peptide | peptide | helix | helix | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | biomaterial | biomaterial | biotech | biotech | biotechnology | biotechnology | nanomaterial | nanomaterial | beta-sheet | beta-sheet | beta sheet | beta sheet | molecular structure | molecular structure | bioengineering | bioengineering | silk | silk | biomimetic | biomimetic | self-assembly | self-assembly | keratin | keratin | collagen | collagen | adhesive | adhesive | GFP | GFP | fluorescent | fluorescent | polymer | polymer | lipid | lipid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (BE.442) (MIT) 20.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (BE.442) (MIT)

Description

This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi

Subjects

protein | protein | hydration | hydration | amino acid | amino acid | ECM | ECM | extracellular matrix | extracellular matrix | peptide | peptide | helix | helix | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | biomaterial | biomaterial | biotech | biotech | biotechnology | biotechnology | nanomaterial | nanomaterial | beta-sheet | beta-sheet | beta sheet | beta sheet | molecular structure | molecular structure | bioengineering | bioengineering | silk | silk | biomimetic | biomimetic | self-assembly | self-assembly | keratin | keratin | collagen | collagen | adhesive | adhesive | GFP | GFP | fluorescent | fluorescent | polymer | polymer | lipid | lipid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Birds (MIT) 3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Birds (MIT)

Description

Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files on this page. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files on this page.

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | service learning | service learning | biomimetic research | biomimetic research | Biomimetics | Biomimetics | biology | biology | mimetic | mimetic | physics | physics | nature | nature | natural engineering | natural engineering | wood | wood | trees | trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.535 Principles and Practice of Tissue Engineering (MIT) HST.535 Principles and Practice of Tissue Engineering (MIT)

Description

The principles and practice of tissue engineering (and regenerative medicine) are taught by faculty of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) and Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The principles underlying strategies for employing selected cells, biomaterial scaffolds, soluble regulators or their genes, and mechanical loading and culture conditions, for the regeneration of tissues and organs in vitro and in vivo are addressed. Differentiated cell types and stem cells are compared and contrasted for this application, as are natural and synthetic scaffolds. Methodology for the preparation of cells and scaffolds in practice is described. The rationale for employing selected growth factors is covered and the techniques for incorporating their genes into the scaffol The principles and practice of tissue engineering (and regenerative medicine) are taught by faculty of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) and Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The principles underlying strategies for employing selected cells, biomaterial scaffolds, soluble regulators or their genes, and mechanical loading and culture conditions, for the regeneration of tissues and organs in vitro and in vivo are addressed. Differentiated cell types and stem cells are compared and contrasted for this application, as are natural and synthetic scaffolds. Methodology for the preparation of cells and scaffolds in practice is described. The rationale for employing selected growth factors is covered and the techniques for incorporating their genes into the scaffol

Subjects

tissue engineering | tissue engineering | scaffold | scaffold | cell | cell | stem cell | stem cell | collagen | collagen | GAG | GAG | ECM | ECM | extracellular matrix | extracellular matrix | biomimetics | biomimetics | healing | healing | skin | skin | nerve | nerve | bone | bone | cartilage | cartilage

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Trees (MIT) 3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Trees (MIT)

Description

Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? Why are some leaves full of holes? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's& freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? Why are some leaves full of holes? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's& freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | service learning | service learning | biomimetic research | biomimetic research | Biomimetics | Biomimetics | biology | biology | mimetic | mimetic | physics | physics | nature | nature | natural engineering | natural engineering | wood | wood | trees | trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.982 Bio-Inspired Structures (MIT) 16.982 Bio-Inspired Structures (MIT)

Description

This course is offered for graduate students who are interested in the interdisciplinary study of bio-inspired structures. The intent is to introduce students to newly inspired modern advanced structures and their applications. It aims to link traditional advanced composites to bio-inspired structures and to discuss their generic properties. A link between materials design, strength and structural behavior at different levels (material, element, structural and system levels) is made. For each level, various concepts will be introduced. The importance of structural, dynamic, thermodynamic and kinetic theories related to such processing is highlighted. The pedagogy is based on active learning and a balance of guest lectures and hands-on activities. This course is offered for graduate students who are interested in the interdisciplinary study of bio-inspired structures. The intent is to introduce students to newly inspired modern advanced structures and their applications. It aims to link traditional advanced composites to bio-inspired structures and to discuss their generic properties. A link between materials design, strength and structural behavior at different levels (material, element, structural and system levels) is made. For each level, various concepts will be introduced. The importance of structural, dynamic, thermodynamic and kinetic theories related to such processing is highlighted. The pedagogy is based on active learning and a balance of guest lectures and hands-on activities.

Subjects

biomimetics | biomimetics | nanotechnology | nanotechnology | smart structures | smart structures | morphing structures | morphing structures | material properties | material properties | nanostructures | nanostructures | self-assembly | self-assembly | structural behavior | structural behavior | nanoparticles | nanoparticles | integrative design | integrative design | bioactive material | bioactive material | nanomanufacturing | nanomanufacturing | smart materials | smart materials | biosensors | biosensors | multifunctional materials | multifunctional materials | bio-inspired structures | bio-inspired structures

License

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MAS.963 Special Topics: Computational Camera and Photography (MIT) MAS.963 Special Topics: Computational Camera and Photography (MIT)

Description

A computational camera attempts to digitally capture the essence of visual information by exploiting the synergistic combination of task-specific optics, illumination, sensors and processing. In this course we will study this emerging multi-disciplinary field at the intersection of signal processing, applied optics, computer graphics and vision, electronics, art, and online sharing through social networks. If novel cameras can be designed to sample light in radically new ways, then rich and useful forms of visual information may be recorded — beyond those present in traditional photographs. Furthermore, if computational process can be made aware of these novel imaging models, them the scene can be analyzed in higher dimensions and novel aesthetic renderings of the visual information A computational camera attempts to digitally capture the essence of visual information by exploiting the synergistic combination of task-specific optics, illumination, sensors and processing. In this course we will study this emerging multi-disciplinary field at the intersection of signal processing, applied optics, computer graphics and vision, electronics, art, and online sharing through social networks. If novel cameras can be designed to sample light in radically new ways, then rich and useful forms of visual information may be recorded — beyond those present in traditional photographs. Furthermore, if computational process can be made aware of these novel imaging models, them the scene can be analyzed in higher dimensions and novel aesthetic renderings of the visual information

Subjects

signal processing; applied optics; Computer graphics; computer vision; online photo; digital photography; digital imaging; visual art image processing | signal processing; applied optics; Computer graphics; computer vision; online photo; digital photography; digital imaging; visual art image processing | image sensor | image sensor | image reconstruction | image reconstruction | medical imaging | medical imaging | mblog | mblog | biomimetics | biomimetics | lens | lens | spectrum | spectrum | multi-spectral | multi-spectral | 3D imaging | 3D imaging | thermal imaging | thermal imaging | high-speed imaging | high-speed imaging | polarization | polarization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Birds (MIT)

Description

Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files on this page.

Subjects

freshman seminar | service learning | biomimetic research | Biomimetics | biology | mimetic | physics | nature | natural engineering | wood | trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Trees (MIT)

Description

Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? Why are some leaves full of holes? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's& freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.

Subjects

freshman seminar | service learning | biomimetic research | Biomimetics | biology | mimetic | physics | nature | natural engineering | wood | trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (BE.442) (MIT)

Description

This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi

Subjects

protein | hydration | amino acid | ECM | extracellular matrix | peptide | helix | DNA | RNA | biomaterial | biotech | biotechnology | nanomaterial | beta-sheet | beta sheet | molecular structure | bioengineering | silk | biomimetic | self-assembly | keratin | collagen | adhesive | GFP | fluorescent | polymer | lipid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Special Topics: Computational Camera and Photography (MIT)

Description

A computational camera attempts to digitally capture the essence of visual information by exploiting the synergistic combination of task-specific optics, illumination, sensors and processing. In this course we will study this emerging multi-disciplinary field at the intersection of signal processing, applied optics, computer graphics and vision, electronics, art, and online sharing through social networks. If novel cameras can be designed to sample light in radically new ways, then rich and useful forms of visual information may be recorded — beyond those present in traditional photographs. Furthermore, if computational process can be made aware of these novel imaging models, them the scene can be analyzed in higher dimensions and novel aesthetic renderings of the visual information

Subjects

signal processing; applied optics; Computer graphics; computer vision; online photo; digital photography; digital imaging; visual art image processing | image sensor | image reconstruction | medical imaging | mblog | biomimetics | lens | spectrum | multi-spectral | 3D imaging | thermal imaging | high-speed imaging | polarization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.052 Nanomechanics of Materials and Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the latest scientific developments and discoveries in the field of nanomechanics, the study of forces and motion on extremely tiny (10-9 m) areas of synthetic and biological materials and structures. At this level, mechanical properties are intimately related to chemistry, physics, and quantum mechanics. Most lectures will consist of a theoretical component that will then be compared to recent experimental data (case studies) in the literature. The course begins with a series of introductory lectures that describes the normal and lateral forces acting at the atomic scale. The following discussions include experimental techniques in high resolution force spectroscopy, atomistic aspects of adhesion, nanoindentation, molecular details of fracture, chemical force microsc

Subjects

biology | biological engineering | cells | AFM | atomic force microscope | nanoindentation | gecko | malaria | nanotube | collagen | polymer | seashell | biomimetics | molecule | atomic | bonding | adhesion | quantum mechanics | physics | chemistry | protein | DNA | bone | lipid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.535 Principles and Practice of Tissue Engineering (MIT)

Description

The principles and practice of tissue engineering (and regenerative medicine) are taught by faculty of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) and Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The principles underlying strategies for employing selected cells, biomaterial scaffolds, soluble regulators or their genes, and mechanical loading and culture conditions, for the regeneration of tissues and organs in vitro and in vivo are addressed. Differentiated cell types and stem cells are compared and contrasted for this application, as are natural and synthetic scaffolds. Methodology for the preparation of cells and scaffolds in practice is described. The rationale for employing selected growth factors is covered and the techniques for incorporating their genes into the scaffol

Subjects

tissue engineering | scaffold | cell | stem cell | collagen | GAG | ECM | extracellular matrix | biomimetics | healing | skin | nerve | bone | cartilage

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (BE.442) (MIT)

Description

This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi

Subjects

protein | hydration | amino acid | ECM | extracellular matrix | peptide | helix | DNA | RNA | biomaterial | biotech | biotechnology | nanomaterial | beta-sheet | beta sheet | molecular structure | bioengineering | silk | biomimetic | self-assembly | keratin | collagen | adhesive | GFP | fluorescent | polymer | lipid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (BE.442) (MIT)

Description

This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi

Subjects

protein | hydration | amino acid | ECM | extracellular matrix | peptide | helix | DNA | RNA | biomaterial | biotech | biotechnology | nanomaterial | beta-sheet | beta sheet | molecular structure | bioengineering | silk | biomimetic | self-assembly | keratin | collagen | adhesive | GFP | fluorescent | polymer | lipid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.982 Bio-Inspired Structures (MIT)

Description

This course is offered for graduate students who are interested in the interdisciplinary study of bio-inspired structures. The intent is to introduce students to newly inspired modern advanced structures and their applications. It aims to link traditional advanced composites to bio-inspired structures and to discuss their generic properties. A link between materials design, strength and structural behavior at different levels (material, element, structural and system levels) is made. For each level, various concepts will be introduced. The importance of structural, dynamic, thermodynamic and kinetic theories related to such processing is highlighted. The pedagogy is based on active learning and a balance of guest lectures and hands-on activities.

Subjects

biomimetics | nanotechnology | smart structures | morphing structures | material properties | nanostructures | self-assembly | structural behavior | nanoparticles | integrative design | bioactive material | nanomanufacturing | smart materials | biosensors | multifunctional materials | bio-inspired structures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (BE.442) (MIT)

Description

This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi

Subjects

protein | hydration | amino acid | ECM | extracellular matrix | peptide | helix | DNA | RNA | biomaterial | biotech | biotechnology | nanomaterial | beta-sheet | beta sheet | molecular structure | bioengineering | silk | biomimetic | self-assembly | keratin | collagen | adhesive | GFP | fluorescent | polymer | lipid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (MIT)

Description

This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives, GFP, and self-assembling peptides. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed. Several experts will be invited to gi

Subjects

protein | hydration | amino acid | ECM | extracellular matrix | peptide | helix | DNA | RNA | biomaterial | biotech | biotechnology | nanomaterial | beta-sheet | beta sheet | molecular structure | bioengineering | silk | biomimetic | self-assembly | keratin | collagen | adhesive | GFP | fluorescent | polymer | lipid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.A35 Biomimetic Principles and Design (MIT)

Description

Biomimetics is based on the belief that nature, at least at times, is a good engineer. Biomimesis is the scientific method of learning new principles and processes based on systematic study, observation and experimentation with live animals and organisms. This Freshman Advising Seminar on the topic is a way for freshmen to explore some of MIT's richness and learn more about what they may want to study in later years.

Subjects

biomimetics | biomimicry | biomimesis | nature | reverse engineering | bionics | adaptation | genetic algorithms | politics | design | imitate | robot | robotics | robotuna | fluid mechanics | fish | swim | submarine | complexity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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