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11.127J Computer Games and Simulations for Investigation and Education (MIT) 11.127J Computer Games and Simulations for Investigation and Education (MIT)

Description

In this project-based course, students from all disciplines are encouraged to understand how we learn from interactive computer environments, and delve into the process of designing and understanding simulations and games for learning. In this project-based course, students from all disciplines are encouraged to understand how we learn from interactive computer environments, and delve into the process of designing and understanding simulations and games for learning.

Subjects

education | education | computers | computers | computer games | computer games | simulations | simulations | edu-tainment | edu-tainment | games | games | video games | video games | board games | board games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 3: Where Do Game Ideas Come From? Lecture 3: Where Do Game Ideas Come From?

Description

Description: The assigned readings introduced two frameworks for designing games: formal abstract design and MDA (Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics). Students play a primitive board game and apply these analytic tools, then modify the rules and repeat the exercise. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics, narrative, strategy, formal abstract design, MDA, game design tools, player experience, ludology, social games, board games, design constraints, playtesting, iterative designTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: The assigned readings introduced two frameworks for designing games: formal abstract design and MDA (Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics). Students play a primitive board game and apply these analytic tools, then modify the rules and repeat the exercise. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics, narrative, strategy, formal abstract design, MDA, game design tools, player experience, ludology, social games, board games, design constraints, playtesting, iterative designTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

mechanics | mechanics | dynamics | dynamics | aesthetics | aesthetics | narrative | narrative | strategy | strategy | formal abstract design | formal abstract design | MDA | MDA | game design tools | game design tools | player experience | player experience | ludology | ludology | social games | social games | board games | board games | design constraints | design constraints | playtesting | playtesting | iterative design | iterative design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 4: Prototyping Lecture 4: Prototyping

Description

Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

playtesting | playtesting | prototyping | prototyping | strategy | strategy | user feedback | user feedback | technical testing | technical testing | design specification | design specification | player experience | player experience | focus testing | focus testing | usability testing | usability testing | target audience | target audience | accessibility | accessibility | marketing | marketing | surveys | surveys | data collection | data collection | board games | board games | video games | video games | card games | card games | teamwork | teamwork | diplomacy | diplomacy | dynamic | dynamic | aesthetic | aesthetic | mechanic | mechanic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 8: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 1 Lecture 8: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 1

Description

Description: Games contain various skill requirements, chance elements, and information availability, which guide strategy development. Changing the balance between these factors can create very different player experiences. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: competition, strategy, game theory, roleplaying, vertigo, mimicry, ilinx, sports, alea, gameshows, randomness, games of skill, games of chance, luck, information theory, communication channel, noise, game state, card games, board games, determinism, probability, decision tree, utility, Nash equilibriumTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Games contain various skill requirements, chance elements, and information availability, which guide strategy development. Changing the balance between these factors can create very different player experiences. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: competition, strategy, game theory, roleplaying, vertigo, mimicry, ilinx, sports, alea, gameshows, randomness, games of skill, games of chance, luck, information theory, communication channel, noise, game state, card games, board games, determinism, probability, decision tree, utility, Nash equilibriumTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

competition | competition | strategy | strategy | game theory | game theory | roleplaying | roleplaying | vertigo | vertigo | mimicry | mimicry | ilinx | ilinx | sports | sports | alea | alea | gameshows | gameshows | randomness | randomness | games of skill | games of skill | games of chance | games of chance | luck | luck | information theory | information theory | communication channel | communication channel | noise | noise | game state | game state | card games | card games | board games | board games | determinism | determinism | probability | probability | decision tree | decision tree | utility | utility | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 9: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 2 Lecture 9: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 2

Description

Description: This lecture reviews the concepts of information flow and uncertainty, analyzing well-known games in these terms. Examples include Scrabble, Go Fish, Mario Kart, Monopoly, chess, poker, War, and Settlers of Catan. Next, students consider feedback loops. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: complexity, determinism, randomness, uncertainty, strategy, games of skill, games of chance, playtesting, information theory, risk, game state, board games, probability, cybernetics, positive feedback loop, negative feedback loopTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: This lecture reviews the concepts of information flow and uncertainty, analyzing well-known games in these terms. Examples include Scrabble, Go Fish, Mario Kart, Monopoly, chess, poker, War, and Settlers of Catan. Next, students consider feedback loops. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: complexity, determinism, randomness, uncertainty, strategy, games of skill, games of chance, playtesting, information theory, risk, game state, board games, probability, cybernetics, positive feedback loop, negative feedback loopTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

complexity | complexity | determinism | determinism | randomness | randomness | uncertainty | uncertainty | strategy | strategy | games of skill | games of skill | games of chance | games of chance | playtesting | playtesting | information theory | information theory | risk | risk | game state | game state | board games | board games | probability | probability | cybernetics | cybernetics | positive feedback loop | positive feedback loop | negative feedback loop | negative feedback loop

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 19: Abstraction and Simulation Lecture 19: Abstraction and Simulation

Description

Description: To build a good simulation, identify relevant features in the source and assumptions in the resulting model. Students explore the meaning of games' choices about what to include, simplify, and abstract, and generate ideas for their next assignment. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: simulation, abstraction, representation, agency, brainstorming, media criticism, art games, board games, SimCity, CivilizationTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: To build a good simulation, identify relevant features in the source and assumptions in the resulting model. Students explore the meaning of games' choices about what to include, simplify, and abstract, and generate ideas for their next assignment. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: simulation, abstraction, representation, agency, brainstorming, media criticism, art games, board games, SimCity, CivilizationTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

simulation | simulation | abstraction | abstraction | representation | representation | agency | agency | brainstorming | brainstorming | media criticism | media criticism | art games | art games | board games | board games | SimCity | SimCity | Civilization | Civilization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 25: Fiction and Stories in Games Lecture 25: Fiction and Stories in Games

Description

Description: Many games incorporate story elements, to drive the plot, set the scene, create engaging characters, etc. Some even use player actions to build an open-ended adventure. Clara Fernandez-Vara talks about how and why to use stories in games. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Clara Fernandez-Vara (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: narrative, environmental storytelling, roleplaying, emergence, storybuilding, non-digital games, digital games, game state, stories, fiction, setting, characters, theme, progression, improvisation, micronarrative, premise, game event, game mechanic, ethics, board games, card gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Many games incorporate story elements, to drive the plot, set the scene, create engaging characters, etc. Some even use player actions to build an open-ended adventure. Clara Fernandez-Vara talks about how and why to use stories in games. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Clara Fernandez-Vara (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: narrative, environmental storytelling, roleplaying, emergence, storybuilding, non-digital games, digital games, game state, stories, fiction, setting, characters, theme, progression, improvisation, micronarrative, premise, game event, game mechanic, ethics, board games, card gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

narrative | narrative | environmental storytelling | environmental storytelling | roleplaying | roleplaying | emergence | emergence | storybuilding | storybuilding | non-digital games | non-digital games | digital games | digital games | game state | game state | stories | stories | fiction | fiction | setting | setting | characters | characters | theme | theme | progression | progression | improvisation | improvisation | micronarrative | micronarrative | premise | premise | game event | game event | game mechanic | game mechanic | ethics | ethics | board games | board games | card games | card games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.890 Algorithmic Lower Bounds: Fun with Hardness Proofs (MIT) 6.890 Algorithmic Lower Bounds: Fun with Hardness Proofs (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 6.890 Algorithmic Lower Bounds: Fun with Hardness Proofs is a class taking a practical approach to proving problems can't be solved efficiently (in polynomial time and assuming standard complexity-theoretic assumptions like P ≠ NP). The class focuses on reductions and techniques for proving problems are computationally hard for a variety of complexity classes. Along the way, the class will create many interesting gadgets, learn many hardness proof styles, explore the connection between games and computation, survey several important problems and complexity classes, and crush hopes and dreams (for fast optimal solutions). Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 6.890 Algorithmic Lower Bounds: Fun with Hardness Proofs is a class taking a practical approach to proving problems can't be solved efficiently (in polynomial time and assuming standard complexity-theoretic assumptions like P ≠ NP). The class focuses on reductions and techniques for proving problems are computationally hard for a variety of complexity classes. Along the way, the class will create many interesting gadgets, learn many hardness proof styles, explore the connection between games and computation, survey several important problems and complexity classes, and crush hopes and dreams (for fast optimal solutions).

Subjects

NP-completeness | NP-completeness | 3SAT | 3SAT | 3-partition | 3-partition | Hamiltonicity | Hamiltonicity | PSPACE | PSPACE | EXPTIME | EXPTIME | EXPSPACE | EXPSPACE | games | games | puzzles | puzzles | computation | computation | Tetris | Tetris | Nintendo | Nintendo | Super Mario Bros. | Super Mario Bros. | The Legend of Zelda | The Legend of Zelda | Metroid | Metroid | Pokémon | Pokémon | constraint logic | constraint logic | Sudoku | Sudoku | Nikoli | Nikoli | Chess | Chess | Go | Go | Othello | Othello | board games | board games | inapproximability | inapproximability | PCP theorem | PCP theorem | OPT-preserving reduction | OPT-preserving reduction | APX-hardness | APX-hardness | vertex cover | vertex cover | Set-cover hardness | Set-cover hardness | Group Steiner tree | Group Steiner tree | k-dense subgraph | k-dense subgraph | label cover | label cover | Unique Games Conjecture | Unique Games Conjecture | independent set | independent set | fixed-parameter intractability | fixed-parameter intractability | parameter-preserving reduction | parameter-preserving reduction | W hierarchy | W hierarchy | clique-hardness | clique-hardness | 3SUM-hardness | 3SUM-hardness | exponential time hypothesis | exponential time hypothesis | counting problems | counting problems | solution uniqueness | solution uniqueness | game theory | game theory | Existential theory of the reals | Existential theory of the reals | undecidability | undecidability

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.127J Computer Games and Simulations for Education and Exploration (MIT) 11.127J Computer Games and Simulations for Education and Exploration (MIT)

Description

This course immerses students in the process of building and testing their own digital and board games in order to better understand how we learn from games. We explore the design and use of games in the classroom in addition to research and development issues associated with computer–based (desktop and handheld) and non–computer–based media. In developing their own games, students examine what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), as well as how games can be implemented in educational settings. This course immerses students in the process of building and testing their own digital and board games in order to better understand how we learn from games. We explore the design and use of games in the classroom in addition to research and development issues associated with computer–based (desktop and handheld) and non–computer–based media. In developing their own games, students examine what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), as well as how games can be implemented in educational settings.

Subjects

11.127 | 11.127 | CMS.590 | CMS.590 | CMS.836 | CMS.836 | 11.252 | 11.252 | education | education | computers | computers | computer games | computer games | video games | video games | board games | board games | game design | game design | minecraft | minecraft | kerbal space program | kerbal space program | fiasco | fiasco | dominion | dominion | agricola | agricola | pandemic | pandemic | a few acres of snow | a few acres of snow | chrononauts | chrononauts | apples to apples | apples to apples | learning | learning | gamers | gamers | digital games | digital games | multiplayer | multiplayer | prototypes | prototypes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 3: Where Do Game Ideas Come From?

Description

Description: The assigned readings introduced two frameworks for designing games: formal abstract design and MDA (Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics). Students play a primitive board game and apply these analytic tools, then modify the rules and repeat the exercise. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics, narrative, strategy, formal abstract design, MDA, game design tools, player experience, ludology, social games, board games, design constraints, playtesting, iterative designTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

mechanics | dynamics | aesthetics | narrative | strategy | formal abstract design | MDA | game design tools | player experience | ludology | social games | board games | design constraints | playtesting | iterative design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 4: Prototyping

Description

Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

playtesting | prototyping | strategy | user feedback | technical testing | design specification | player experience | focus testing | usability testing | target audience | accessibility | marketing | surveys | data collection | board games | video games | card games | teamwork | diplomacy | dynamic | aesthetic | mechanic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 8: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 1

Description

Description: Games contain various skill requirements, chance elements, and information availability, which guide strategy development. Changing the balance between these factors can create very different player experiences. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: competition, strategy, game theory, roleplaying, vertigo, mimicry, ilinx, sports, alea, gameshows, randomness, games of skill, games of chance, luck, information theory, communication channel, noise, game state, card games, board games, determinism, probability, decision tree, utility, Nash equilibriumTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

competition | strategy | game theory | roleplaying | vertigo | mimicry | ilinx | sports | alea | gameshows | randomness | games of skill | games of chance | luck | information theory | communication channel | noise | game state | card games | board games | determinism | probability | decision tree | utility | Nash equilibrium

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 9: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 2

Description

Description: This lecture reviews the concepts of information flow and uncertainty, analyzing well-known games in these terms. Examples include Scrabble, Go Fish, Mario Kart, Monopoly, chess, poker, War, and Settlers of Catan. Next, students consider feedback loops. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: complexity, determinism, randomness, uncertainty, strategy, games of skill, games of chance, playtesting, information theory, risk, game state, board games, probability, cybernetics, positive feedback loop, negative feedback loopTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

complexity | determinism | randomness | uncertainty | strategy | games of skill | games of chance | playtesting | information theory | risk | game state | board games | probability | cybernetics | positive feedback loop | negative feedback loop

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 19: Abstraction and Simulation

Description

Description: To build a good simulation, identify relevant features in the source and assumptions in the resulting model. Students explore the meaning of games' choices about what to include, simplify, and abstract, and generate ideas for their next assignment. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: simulation, abstraction, representation, agency, brainstorming, media criticism, art games, board games, SimCity, CivilizationTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

simulation | abstraction | representation | agency | brainstorming | media criticism | art games | board games | SimCity | Civilization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 25: Fiction and Stories in Games

Description

Description: Many games incorporate story elements, to drive the plot, set the scene, create engaging characters, etc. Some even use player actions to build an open-ended adventure. Clara Fernandez-Vara talks about how and why to use stories in games. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Clara Fernandez-Vara (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: narrative, environmental storytelling, roleplaying, emergence, storybuilding, non-digital games, digital games, game state, stories, fiction, setting, characters, theme, progression, improvisation, micronarrative, premise, game event, game mechanic, ethics, board games, card gamesTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

narrative | environmental storytelling | roleplaying | emergence | storybuilding | non-digital games | digital games | game state | stories | fiction | setting | characters | theme | progression | improvisation | micronarrative | premise | game event | game mechanic | ethics | board games | card games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.127J Computer Games and Simulations for Education and Exploration (MIT)

Description

This course immerses students in the process of building and testing their own digital and board games in order to better understand how we learn from games. We explore the design and use of games in the classroom in addition to research and development issues associated with computer–based (desktop and handheld) and non–computer–based media. In developing their own games, students examine what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), as well as how games can be implemented in educational settings.

Subjects

11.127 | CMS.590 | CMS.836 | 11.252 | education | computers | computer games | video games | board games | game design | minecraft | kerbal space program | fiasco | dominion | agricola | pandemic | a few acres of snow | chrononauts | apples to apples | learning | gamers | digital games | multiplayer | prototypes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.890 Algorithmic Lower Bounds: Fun with Hardness Proofs (MIT)

Description

6.890 Algorithmic Lower Bounds: Fun with Hardness Proofs is a class taking a practical approach to proving problems can't be solved efficiently (in polynomial time and assuming standard complexity-theoretic assumptions like P ≠ NP). The class focuses on reductions and techniques for proving problems are computationally hard for a variety of complexity classes. Along the way, the class will create many interesting gadgets, learn many hardness proof styles, explore the connection between games and computation, survey several important problems and complexity classes, and crush hopes and dreams (for fast optimal solutions).

Subjects

NP-completeness | 3SAT | 3-partition | Hamiltonicity | PSPACE | EXPTIME | EXPSPACE | games | puzzles | computation | Tetris | Nintendo | Super Mario Bros. | The Legend of Zelda | Metroid | mon | constraint logic | Sudoku | Nikoli | Chess | Go | Othello | board games | inapproximability | PCP theorem | OPT-preserving reduction | APX-hardness | vertex cover | Set-cover hardness | Group Steiner tree | k-dense subgraph | label cover | Unique Games Conjecture | independent set | fixed-parameter intractability | parameter-preserving reduction | W hierarchy | clique-hardness | 3SUM-hardness | exponential time hypothesis | counting problems | solution uniqueness | game theory | Existential theory of the reals | undecidability

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Lecture 3: Where Do Game Ideas Come From?

Description

Description: The assigned readings introduced two frameworks for designing games: formal abstract design and MDA (Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics). Students play a primitive board game and apply these analytic tools, then modify the rules and repeat the exercise. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics, narrative, strategy, formal abstract design, MDA, game design tools, player experience, ludology, social games, board games, design constraints, playtesting, iterative designTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

mechanics | dynamics | aesthetics | narrative | strategy | formal abstract design | MDA | game design tools | player experience | ludology | social games | board games | design constraints | playtesting | iterative design

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Lecture 4: Prototyping

Description

Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

playtesting | prototyping | strategy | user feedback | technical testing | design specification | player experience | focus testing | usability testing | target audience | accessibility | marketing | surveys | data collection | board games | video games | card games | teamwork | diplomacy | dynamic | aesthetic | mechanic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 8: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 1

Description

Description: Games contain various skill requirements, chance elements, and information availability, which guide strategy development. Changing the balance between these factors can create very different player experiences. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: competition, strategy, game theory, roleplaying, vertigo, mimicry, ilinx, sports, alea, gameshows, randomness, games of skill, games of chance, luck, information theory, communication channel, noise, game state, card games, board games, determinism, probability, decision tree, utility, Nash equilibriumTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

competition | strategy | game theory | roleplaying | vertigo | mimicry | ilinx | sports | alea | gameshows | randomness | games of skill | games of chance | luck | information theory | communication channel | noise | game state | card games | board games | determinism | probability | decision tree | utility | Nash equilibrium

License

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Lecture 9: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 2

Description

Description: This lecture reviews the concepts of information flow and uncertainty, analyzing well-known games in these terms. Examples include Scrabble, Go Fish, Mario Kart, Monopoly, chess, poker, War, and Settlers of Catan. Next, students consider feedback loops. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: complexity, determinism, randomness, uncertainty, strategy, games of skill, games of chance, playtesting, information theory, risk, game state, board games, probability, cybernetics, positive feedback loop, negative feedback loopTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

complexity | determinism | randomness | uncertainty | strategy | games of skill | games of chance | playtesting | information theory | risk | game state | board games | probability | cybernetics | positive feedback loop | negative feedback loop

License

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Lecture 19: Abstraction and Simulation

Description

Description: To build a good simulation, identify relevant features in the source and assumptions in the resulting model. Students explore the meaning of games' choices about what to include, simplify, and abstract, and generate ideas for their next assignment. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: simulation, abstraction, representation, agency, brainstorming, media criticism, art games, board games, SimCity, CivilizationTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

simulation | abstraction | representation | agency | brainstorming | media criticism | art games | board games | SimCity | Civilization

License

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Lecture 25: Fiction and Stories in Games

Description

Description: Many games incorporate story elements, to drive the plot, set the scene, create engaging characters, etc. Some even use player actions to build an open-ended adventure. Clara Fernandez-Vara talks about how and why to use stories in games. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Clara Fernandez-Vara (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: narrative, environmental storytelling, roleplaying, emergence, storybuilding, non-digital games, digital games, game state, stories, fiction, setting, characters, theme, progression, improvisation, micronarrative, premise, game event, game mechanic, ethics, board games, card gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

narrative | environmental storytelling | roleplaying | emergence | storybuilding | non-digital games | digital games | game state | stories | fiction | setting | characters | theme | progression | improvisation | micronarrative | premise | game event | game mechanic | ethics | board games | card games

License

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11.127J Computer Games and Simulations for Investigation and Education (MIT)

Description

In this project-based course, students from all disciplines are encouraged to understand how we learn from interactive computer environments, and delve into the process of designing and understanding simulations and games for learning.

Subjects

education | computers | computer games | simulations | edu-tainment | games | video games | board games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.301 Introduction to Game Design Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of the process of designing games and playful experiences. Students are familiarized with methods, concepts, techniques, and literature used in the design of games. The strategy is process-oriented, focusing on aspects such as: Rapid prototyping, play testing, and design iteration using a player-centered approach.

Subjects

game design | prototyping | play testing | user experience | design practice | design studies | design exploration | board games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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