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7.343 Network Medicine: Using Systems Biology and Signaling Networks to Create Novel Cancer Therapeutics (MIT) 7.343 Network Medicine: Using Systems Biology and Signaling Networks to Create Novel Cancer Therapeutics (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will survey the primary systems biology literature, particularly as it pertains to understanding and treating various forms of cancer. We will consider various computational and experimental techniques being used in the field of systems biology, focusing on how systems principles have helped advance biological understanding. We will also discuss the application of the principles of systems biology and network biology to drug development, an emerging discipline called "network medicine." This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive sett In this course, we will survey the primary systems biology literature, particularly as it pertains to understanding and treating various forms of cancer. We will consider various computational and experimental techniques being used in the field of systems biology, focusing on how systems principles have helped advance biological understanding. We will also discuss the application of the principles of systems biology and network biology to drug development, an emerging discipline called "network medicine." This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive sett

Subjects

systems biology | systems biology | network medicine | network medicine | cancer | cancer | cancer therapeutics | cancer therapeutics | quantitative high-throughput data acquisition | quantitative high-throughput data acquisition | genomic analysis | genomic analysis | signaling network biology | signaling network biology | statistical/computational modeling | statistical/computational modeling | network biology | network biology | drug development | drug development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 Cancer Biology: From Basic Research to the Clinic (MIT) 7.342 Cancer Biology: From Basic Research to the Clinic (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In 1971, President Nixon declared the "War on Cancer," but after three decades the war is still raging. How much progress have we made toward winning the war and what are we doing to improve the fight? Understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis is crucial to the development of innovative therapy for cancer patients. Insights into these processes have been gleaned through basic research using biochemical, molecular, and genetic ana This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In 1971, President Nixon declared the "War on Cancer," but after three decades the war is still raging. How much progress have we made toward winning the war and what are we doing to improve the fight? Understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis is crucial to the development of innovative therapy for cancer patients. Insights into these processes have been gleaned through basic research using biochemical, molecular, and genetic ana

Subjects

cancer | cancer | tumor | tumor | metastasis | metastasis | genetic analysis | genetic analysis | cancer biology | cancer biology | model organisms | model organisms | genetic pathways | genetic pathways | uncontrolled growth | uncontrolled growth | tumor suppressor genes | tumor suppressor genes | oncogenes | oncogenes | tumor initiation | tumor initiation | cell cycle | cell cycle | chromosomal aberration | chromosomal aberration | apoptosis | apoptosis | cell death | cell death | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | proto-oncogene | proto-oncogene | mutation | mutation | DNA mismatch repair | DNA mismatch repair | telomeres | telomeres | mouse models | mouse models | tissue specificity | tissue specificity | malignancy | malignancy | stem cells | stem cells | therapeutic resistance | therapeutic resistance | differentiation | differentiation | caner research | caner research | cancer therapeutics | cancer therapeutics | chemotherapy | chemotherapy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 Network Medicine: Using Systems Biology and Signaling Networks to Create Novel Cancer Therapeutics (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will survey the primary systems biology literature, particularly as it pertains to understanding and treating various forms of cancer. We will consider various computational and experimental techniques being used in the field of systems biology, focusing on how systems principles have helped advance biological understanding. We will also discuss the application of the principles of systems biology and network biology to drug development, an emerging discipline called "network medicine." This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive sett

Subjects

systems biology | network medicine | cancer | cancer therapeutics | quantitative high-throughput data acquisition | genomic analysis | signaling network biology | statistical/computational modeling | network biology | drug development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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7.342 Cancer Biology: From Basic Research to the Clinic (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In 1971, President Nixon declared the "War on Cancer," but after three decades the war is still raging. How much progress have we made toward winning the war and what are we doing to improve the fight? Understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis is crucial to the development of innovative therapy for cancer patients. Insights into these processes have been gleaned through basic research using biochemical, molecular, and genetic ana

Subjects

cancer | tumor | metastasis | genetic analysis | cancer biology | model organisms | genetic pathways | uncontrolled growth | tumor suppressor genes | oncogenes | tumor initiation | cell cycle | chromosomal aberration | apoptosis | cell death | signal transduction pathways | proto-oncogene | mutation | DNA mismatch repair | telomeres | mouse models | tissue specificity | malignancy | stem cells | therapeutic resistance | differentiation | caner research | cancer therapeutics | chemotherapy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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