Searching for capitalism : 102 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4

ía de las Relaciones Laborales ía de las Relaciones Laborales

Description

En esta asignatura se proporciona una introducción al desarrollo histórico de los sistemas de relaciones laborales en los países de Occidente. Se revisan los principales factores económicos, sociales, políticos, ideológicos e institucionales que han incidido en la consolidación de distintas configuraciones de actores colectivos e instituciones en distintos países y momentos históricos. En esta asignatura se proporciona una introducción al desarrollo histórico de los sistemas de relaciones laborales en los países de Occidente. Se revisan los principales factores económicos, sociales, políticos, ideológicos e institucionales que han incidido en la consolidación de distintas configuraciones de actores colectivos e instituciones en distintos países y momentos históricos.

Subjects

Socialismo | Socialismo | ón francesa | ón francesa | ón industrial | ón industrial | Liberalismo | Liberalismo | Nacionalismo | Nacionalismo | Licenciatura en Derecho | Licenciatura en Derecho | Estado del bienestar | Estado del bienestar | estrategias sindicales y patronales | estrategias sindicales y patronales | movimiento obrero | movimiento obrero | Derecho del Trabajo y de la Seguridad Social | Derecho del Trabajo y de la Seguridad Social | Fordismo | Fordismo | capitalismo | capitalismo | actividad sindical | actividad sindical | sociedad del mercado | sociedad del mercado | 2009 | 2009 | Licenciatura en Ciencias del Trabajo | Licenciatura en Ciencias del Trabajo | ía de las relaciones laborales | ía de las relaciones laborales

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

Site sourced from

http://ocw.uc3m.es/ocwuniversia/rss_all

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.416J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 21H.416J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. The subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies. This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. The subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subjects

medieval Europe | medieval Europe | society | society | economy | economy | feudalism | feudalism | agriculture | agriculture | disease | disease | epidemic | epidemic | capitalism | capitalism | 21H.416 | 21H.416 | 14.70 | 14.70

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.062J Drugs, Politics, and Culture (MIT) STS.062J Drugs, Politics, and Culture (MIT)

Description

Examines the relationship between drugs, politics, and society in cross-cultural perspective; use of mind-altering and habit-forming substances by "traditional societies"; the development of a global trade in sugar, opium, and cocaine with the rise of capitalism; and the use and abuse of alcohol, LSD, and Prozac in the US. Finishes by looking at the war on drugs, shifting attitudes to tobacco, and by evaluating America's drug laws. Examines the relationship between drugs, politics, and society in cross-cultural perspective; use of mind-altering and habit-forming substances by "traditional societies"; the development of a global trade in sugar, opium, and cocaine with the rise of capitalism; and the use and abuse of alcohol, LSD, and Prozac in the US. Finishes by looking at the war on drugs, shifting attitudes to tobacco, and by evaluating America's drug laws.

Subjects

drugs | drugs | politics | politics | society | society | cross-cultural perspective | cross-cultural perspective | mind-altering substances | mind-altering substances | habit-forming substances | habit-forming substances | global trade | global trade | sugar | sugar | opium | opium | cocaine | cocaine | capitalism | capitalism | alcohol | alcohol | alcohol abuse | alcohol abuse | LSD | LSD | Prozac | Prozac | war on drugs | war on drugs | tobacco | tobacco | drug laws | drug laws | STS.062 | STS.062 | 21A.344 | 21A.344

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT) 21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT)

Description

This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two. This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two.

Subjects

Muscovy | Muscovy | Empire | Empire | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Catherine II | Pugachev | Pugachev | nobility | nobility | Constitution | Constitution | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Nicholas I | Decembrists | Decembrists | serfdom | serfdom | Alexander II | Alexander II | Great reforms | Great reforms | intelligentsia | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Caucasus | Chechnya | Chechnya | Lenin | Lenin | World War I | World War I | Nicholas II | Nicholas II | Rasputin | Rasputin | Russia | Russia | social heritage | social heritage | cultural heritage | cultural heritage | political heritage | political heritage | Eurasian imperialism | Eurasian imperialism | autocracy | autocracy | political reform | political reform | political revolution | political revolution | revolutionary | revolutionary | debates | debates | capitalism | capitalism | historical texts | historical texts | literary texts | literary texts | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 19th century | 19th century | major European power | major European power | intellectual class | intellectual class | autocratic order | autocratic order | states | states | societies | societies | West | West | national consciousness | national consciousness | state | state | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.416 Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 21H.416 Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies. This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subjects

medieval Europe | medieval Europe | society | society | economy | economy | feudalism | feudalism | agriculture | agriculture | disease | disease | epidemic | epidemic | capitalism | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

In Defense of Business Ethics - Said Business School Centre for Corporate Reputation

Description

Roger Crisp gives a talk on business ethics as part of the Said Business School's Seminar - The ethics of reputation and the reputation of ethics: oxymoron or research subject? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

helex | business | capitalism | oxford | ethics | law | corporate | helex | business | capitalism | oxford | ethics | law | corporate

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129186/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

From Attlee to Miliband: Can Labour and Unions Face the Future?

Description

This year's University College Clement Attlee Memorial Lecture will be given by Frances O'Grady, General Secretary of the TUC. Frances O'Grady has been an active trade unionist and campaigner all her working life. In 1994 Frances was appointed as TUC Campaigns Officer and ran campaigns for equal rights for part-timers and against low pay. In 1997, she was appointed to head up the New Unionism campaign and launched the TUC's Organising Academy. In January 2013 Frances became the General Secretary of the TUC, the first woman ever to hold this post. Fair pay remains a core ambition - she was on the Resolution Foundation's Commission on Living Standards, and has been a member of the Low Pay and the High Pay Commissions. Frances is a strong believer in protecting the public service ethos, Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

university college | socialism | labour party | Attlee | Clement Attlee | capitalism | labour | nhs | politics | austerity | university college | socialism | labour party | Attlee | Clement Attlee | capitalism | labour | nhs | politics | austerity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129194/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.561 European Politics (MIT) 17.561 European Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the organization of political power and the dynamics of political change in Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. In particular, it focuses on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations. This course examines the organization of political power and the dynamics of political change in Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. In particular, it focuses on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations.

Subjects

European politics | European politics | political power | political power | Britain | Britain | France | France | Germany | Germany | Italy | Italy | political parties | political parties | social class | social class | citizenship | citizenship | prime ministers | prime ministers | economy | economy | dictatorship | dictatorship | democracy | democracy | capitalism | capitalism | labour | labour | liberalization | liberalization | history | history | corruption | corruption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.125 The Politics of Global Financial Relations (MIT) 17.125 The Politics of Global Financial Relations (MIT)

Description

This course explores effects of globalization of finance on international relations and domestic politics. Topics include international institutions and global governance; the multi-nationalization of production; effects of international capital markets on domestic politics; global finance and the developing world; and financial crises. Discussion of the interplay between politics and economics and the future of the nation-state. This course explores effects of globalization of finance on international relations and domestic politics. Topics include international institutions and global governance; the multi-nationalization of production; effects of international capital markets on domestic politics; global finance and the developing world; and financial crises. Discussion of the interplay between politics and economics and the future of the nation-state.

Subjects

multinational corporation | multinational corporation | bond market | bond market | welfare state | welfare state | foreign exchange market | foreign exchange market | exchange rate | exchange rate | IMF | IMF | global economy | global economy | globalization | globalization | finanical crime | finanical crime | money laundering | money laundering | international integration of capital markets | international integration of capital markets | national policymaking | national policymaking | foreign direct investment | foreign direct investment | international institutions | international institutions | global governance | global governance | global finance | global finance | developing world | developing world | financial crises | financial crises | domestic politics | domestic politics | currency crises | currency crises | Paul Krugman | Paul Krugman | J. Lawrence Broz | J. Lawrence Broz | Jeffry Frieden | Jeffry Frieden | global capitalism | global capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.954 Community-Owned Enterprise and Civic Participation (MIT) 11.954 Community-Owned Enterprise and Civic Participation (MIT)

Description

This course will examine literature and practice regarding community-owned enterprise as an alternative means of increasing community participation and development. The use of cooperatives, credit unions, land trusts, and limited stock ownership enterprises for increasing community participation and empowerment will be examined. This course will examine literature and practice regarding community-owned enterprise as an alternative means of increasing community participation and development. The use of cooperatives, credit unions, land trusts, and limited stock ownership enterprises for increasing community participation and empowerment will be examined.

Subjects

cooperatives | cooperatives | capitalism | capitalism | participatory democracy | participatory democracy | social capital | social capital | community governance | community governance | politics | politics | economy | economy | power dynamics | power dynamics | environmental sustainability | environmental sustainability | economic development | economic development | markets | markets | institutions | institutions | community development | community development | poverty | poverty | real estate | real estate | trusts | trusts | housing coops | housing coops | banking | banking | unions | unions | pensions | pensions | investments | investments | privatization | privatization | gainsharing | gainsharing | remittances | remittances

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.975 U-Lab: Leading Profound Innovation for a More Sustainable World (MIT) 15.975 U-Lab: Leading Profound Innovation for a More Sustainable World (MIT)

Description

15.975 U-Lab: Leading Profound Innovation for a More Sustainable World is an interactive and experiential class about leading profound innovation for pioneering a more sustainable economy and society. The class is organized around personal reflection practices, relational practices, and societal practices. It focuses on the intertwined relationship between the evolution of capitalism, multi-stakeholder innovation, and presencing. 15.975 U-Lab: Leading Profound Innovation for a More Sustainable World is an interactive and experiential class about leading profound innovation for pioneering a more sustainable economy and society. The class is organized around personal reflection practices, relational practices, and societal practices. It focuses on the intertwined relationship between the evolution of capitalism, multi-stakeholder innovation, and presencing.

Subjects

presencing | presencing | Theory U | Theory U | innovation | innovation | capitalism | capitalism | leadership | leadership | listening | listening | empathy | empathy | creativity | creativity | sustainability | sustainability | U-process | U-process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.336 Marketing, Microchips and McDonalds: Debating Globalization (MIT) 21A.336 Marketing, Microchips and McDonalds: Debating Globalization (MIT)

Description

Everyday we are bombarded with the word "global" and encouraged to see globalization as the quintessential transformation of our age. But what exactly does "globalization" mean? How is it affecting the lives of people around the world, not only in economic, but social and cultural terms? How do contemporary changes compare with those from other historical periods? Are such changes positive, negative or simply inevitable? And, finally, how does the concept of the "global" itself shape our perceptions in ways that both help us understand the contemporary world and potentially distort it? This course begins by offering a brief overview of historical "world systems," including those centered in Asia as well as Europe. It explores the nature of contemporary transformations, including th Everyday we are bombarded with the word "global" and encouraged to see globalization as the quintessential transformation of our age. But what exactly does "globalization" mean? How is it affecting the lives of people around the world, not only in economic, but social and cultural terms? How do contemporary changes compare with those from other historical periods? Are such changes positive, negative or simply inevitable? And, finally, how does the concept of the "global" itself shape our perceptions in ways that both help us understand the contemporary world and potentially distort it? This course begins by offering a brief overview of historical "world systems," including those centered in Asia as well as Europe. It explores the nature of contemporary transformations, including th

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | marketing | marketing | globalization | globalization | culture | culture | class | class | economic status | economic status | social dynamics | social dynamics | technology | technology | capitalism | capitalism | java | java | amazon | amazon | france | france | united states | united states | bombay | bombay | india | india | japan | japan | immigration | immigration | film | film | workers | workers | tourism | tourism | factory labor | factory labor | global | global | economic transformation | economic transformation | media | media | political transformation | political transformation | geographic tranformation | geographic tranformation | history | history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT) STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT)

Description

This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper. This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper.

Subjects

STS.025 | STS.025 | 21H.913 | 21H.913 | world history | world history | British history | British history | European history | European history | Asian history | Asian history | South American history | South American history | American history | American history | 18th century | 18th century | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | transportation | transportation | warfare | warfare | capitalism | capitalism | electrification | electrification | factories | factories | mass communication | mass communication | industrialization | industrialization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.436 Cold War Science (MIT) STS.436 Cold War Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines the history and legacy of the Cold War on American science. It explores scientist's new political roles after World War II, ranging from elite policy makers in the nuclear age to victims of domestic anti Communism. It also examines the changing institutions in which the physical sciences and social sciences were conducted during the postwar decades, investigating possible epistemic effects on forms of knowledge. The subject closes by considering the place of science in the post-Cold War era. This seminar examines the history and legacy of the Cold War on American science. It explores scientist's new political roles after World War II, ranging from elite policy makers in the nuclear age to victims of domestic anti Communism. It also examines the changing institutions in which the physical sciences and social sciences were conducted during the postwar decades, investigating possible epistemic effects on forms of knowledge. The subject closes by considering the place of science in the post-Cold War era.

Subjects

cold war | cold war | history of science | history of science | nuclear age | nuclear age | post-cold-war era | post-cold-war era | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | atom bomb | atom bomb | hydrogen bomb | hydrogen bomb | atomic energy | atomic energy | McCarthyism | McCarthyism | espionage | espionage | anti-communism | anti-communism | spying | spying | soviet union | soviet union | american science | american science | HUAC | HUAC | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | arms race | arms race | disarmament | disarmament | Sputnik | Sputnik | iron curtain | iron curtain | space race | space race | globalization | globalization | capitalism | capitalism | academic freedom | academic freedom | CIA | CIA | National Security Agency | National Security Agency | NSA | NSA | military-industrial complex | military-industrial complex | quantum physics | quantum physics | physics | physics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT) STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT)

Description

Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology, Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology,

Subjects

history | history | technology | technology | science | science | techne | techne | industry | industry | intellectual history | intellectual history | cultural history | cultural history | management | management | engineering | engineering | industrial arts | industrial arts | mechanism | mechanism | mechanical arts | mechanical arts | technological determinism | technological determinism | manufacturing | manufacturing | manufactures | manufactures | factory | factory | capitalism | capitalism | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | innovation | innovation | ecology | ecology | environmentalism | environmentalism | pollution | pollution | literature | literature | American history | American history | the Enlightenment | the Enlightenment | industrialization | industrialization | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT) STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT)

Description

This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by

Subjects

landscape | landscape | technology | technology | nature | nature | wilderness | wilderness | industry | industry | industrial | industrial | commons | commons | America | America | history | history | agriculture | agriculture | systems | systems | conservation | conservation | preservation | preservation | development | development | environment | environment | native American | native American | railroad | railroad | transportation | transportation | aesthetics | aesthetics | colonial history | colonial history | Dust Bowl | Dust Bowl | National Parks | National Parks | water | water | drought | drought | natural resources | natural resources | food | food | materialism | materialism | capitalism | capitalism | organic food | organic food | photography | photography | film | film

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.062J Drugs, Politics, and Culture (MIT) STS.062J Drugs, Politics, and Culture (MIT)

Description

This class examines the relationship between a number of mind-altering substances and cultural processes. We look at the relationship between drugs and such phenomena as poverty, religion, technology, inter-generational conflict, colonialism, and global capitalism. We read about the physiological and psychological effects of these substances -- ranging from alcohol to LSD, cocaine and ecstasy -- and ask why different societies prohibit and sanction different drugs. We examine the use of mind-altering substances in a number of "traditional" societies, and follow the development of a global trade in such substances as sugar, coffee, tea, nicotine, cocaine, and marijuana concurrent with the evolution of global capitalism. We look at the use of LSD as a mind-control substance by the CIA and This class examines the relationship between a number of mind-altering substances and cultural processes. We look at the relationship between drugs and such phenomena as poverty, religion, technology, inter-generational conflict, colonialism, and global capitalism. We read about the physiological and psychological effects of these substances -- ranging from alcohol to LSD, cocaine and ecstasy -- and ask why different societies prohibit and sanction different drugs. We examine the use of mind-altering substances in a number of "traditional" societies, and follow the development of a global trade in such substances as sugar, coffee, tea, nicotine, cocaine, and marijuana concurrent with the evolution of global capitalism. We look at the use of LSD as a mind-control substance by the CIA and

Subjects

drugs | drugs | politics | politics | society | society | cross-cultural perspective | cross-cultural perspective | mind-altering substances | mind-altering substances | habit-forming substances | habit-forming substances | global trade | global trade | sugar | sugar | opium | opium | cocaine | cocaine | capitalism | capitalism | alcohol | alcohol | alcohol abuse | alcohol abuse | LSD | LSD | Prozac | Prozac | war on drugs | war on drugs | tobacco | tobacco | drug laws. | drug laws. | STS.062 | STS.062 | 21A.344 | 21A.344

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.464 Cultural History of Technology (MIT) STS.464 Cultural History of Technology (MIT)

Description

The subject of this course is the historical process by which the meaning of "technology" has been constructed. Although the word itself is traceable to the ancient Greek root teckhne (meaning art), it did not enter the English language until the 17th century, and did not acquire its current meaning until after World War I. The aim of the course, then, is to explore various sectors of industrializing 19th and 20th century Western society and culture with a view to explaining and assessing the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary (especially Anglo-American) thought and expression. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to y The subject of this course is the historical process by which the meaning of "technology" has been constructed. Although the word itself is traceable to the ancient Greek root teckhne (meaning art), it did not enter the English language until the 17th century, and did not acquire its current meaning until after World War I. The aim of the course, then, is to explore various sectors of industrializing 19th and 20th century Western society and culture with a view to explaining and assessing the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary (especially Anglo-American) thought and expression. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to y

Subjects

history | history | technology | technology | science | science | techne | techne | industry | industry | intellectual history | intellectual history | cultural history | cultural history | management | management | engineering | engineering | industrial arts | industrial arts | mechanism | mechanism | mechanic arts | mechanic arts | mechanical arts | mechanical arts | Bigelow | Bigelow | Taylorism | Taylorism | determinism | determinism | technological determinism | technological determinism | manufacturing | manufacturing | manufactures | manufactures | factory | factory | capitalism | capitalism | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | innovation | innovation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT) STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT)

Description

In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist

Subjects

History | History | food | food | analysis | analysis | transform | transform | technological innovations | technological innovations | preserve | preserve | surplus | surplus | drying | drying | freezing | freezing | canning | canning | salting | salting | travel | travel | space | space | lived | lived | relations | relations | neighbors | neighbors | relatives | relatives | economic order | economic order | capitalism | capitalism | preservation | preservation | development | development | cultural | cultural | political | political | economic | economic | techno-scientific history | techno-scientific history | mass-production techniques | mass-production techniques | industrial farming initiatives | industrial farming initiatives | consumption | consumption | vertical integration | vertical integration | business firms | business firms | globalization | globalization | race | race | gender identities | gender identities | labor movements | labor movements | America | America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2nd St Cross Seminar TT13: Ethics In Finance: A New Financial Theory For A Post-Financialized World

Description

The lecture describes why financial theory and teaching has ignored ethics, viewing moral values as irrelevant. We trace the reason for the neglect of ethics back to assumptions made by Modern Finance Theory, the en courant theory in finance. The neo-classical assumption that economic agents are rational profit maximizers has, over decades, become uncritically accepted as the norm and the truth about people's economic behavior in western-style capitalist economies. The lecture demonstrates how economic agents are assumed to be rational profit maximizing individuals has become the ethic i.e., economic agents ought to be rational, profit maximizing individuals. This resulting ethic is an impoverished value system, inadequate for an increasingly complex, global financial system. Modern finan Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethics | Moral Philosophy | economics | Islamic finance | capitalism | ethics | Moral Philosophy | economics | Islamic finance | capitalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129191/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Introduction to Ethics: Judgment, Motivation, Action

Description

Paula Boddington gives a talk introducing the concept of ethics in business as part of the Said Business School's Seminar - The ethics of reputation and the reputation of ethics: oxymoron or research subject? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

helex | business | judgment | capitalism | thought | action | oxford | ethics | law | corporate | helex | business | judgment | capitalism | thought | action | oxford | ethics | law | corporate

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129150/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

(In)formal Economies, Economies of Favour: The End of Transition?

Description

Dr John Round, Senior Lecturer in Human Geography, University of Birmingham and Higher School of Economics, Moscow and Dr Nicolette Makovicky, Departmental Lecturer in Russian and East European Studies give a talk for the FLJS Series Twenty-five years on from the collapse of communism in the Eastern Bloc, this book colloquium will take a comparative approach to two new publications on the importance in everyday life of the informal economy in a post-Soviet, post-Socialist era. In recent years, there has emerged a growing consensus among social scientists that everyday economic transactions ? comprising cash-in-hand work, subsistence production, and the use of social networks ? have increasingly become subsumed by a more thoroughly regulated formal economy. But two books published in th Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

law | justice | socialism | capitalism | economics | politics | law | justice | socialism | capitalism | economics | politics | 2014-03-20

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/128995/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.461 What is Capitalism? (MIT) 21A.461 What is Capitalism? (MIT)

Description

As we live in the aftermath of the Financial Crisis of 2008, there are renewed questions about the nature of the economic system—capitalism—within which we live. What are its benefits and drawbacks? Why does it garner both so much opposition and support? What are its moral, economic, social and political implications? Is it even a "system"? How has capitalism played out in different historical moments and regions of the world? This class addresses the question "what is capitalism?" from a social scientific point of view, rather than a classical economic one.  As we live in the aftermath of the Financial Crisis of 2008, there are renewed questions about the nature of the economic system—capitalism—within which we live. What are its benefits and drawbacks? Why does it garner both so much opposition and support? What are its moral, economic, social and political implications? Is it even a "system"? How has capitalism played out in different historical moments and regions of the world? This class addresses the question "what is capitalism?" from a social scientific point of view, rather than a classical economic one. 

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | capitalism | capitalism | capitalist | capitalist | socialism | socialism | socialist | socialist | ethnography | ethnography | ethnographic | ethnographic | economics | economics | inequality | inequality | class | class | financial crisis | financial crisis | weber | weber | bourdieu | bourdieu | Post-Structuralism | Post-Structuralism | Post-Structuralist | Post-Structuralist | globalization | globalization | tea party | tea party | occupy wall street | occupy wall street | socioeconomic | socioeconomic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.72 Capitalism and Its Critics (MIT) 14.72 Capitalism and Its Critics (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the evolution of the modern capitalist economy and evaluates its current structure and performance. Various paradigms of economics are contrasted and compared (neoclassical, Marxist, socioeconomic, and neocorporate) in order to understand how modern capitalism has been shaped and how it functions in today's economy. The course stresses general analytic reasoning and problem formulation rather than specific analytic techniques. Readings include classics in economic thought as well as contemporary analyses. This course addresses the evolution of the modern capitalist economy and evaluates its current structure and performance. Various paradigms of economics are contrasted and compared (neoclassical, Marxist, socioeconomic, and neocorporate) in order to understand how modern capitalism has been shaped and how it functions in today's economy. The course stresses general analytic reasoning and problem formulation rather than specific analytic techniques. Readings include classics in economic thought as well as contemporary analyses.

Subjects

capitalism | capitalism | markets | markets | Thomas Kuhn | Thomas Kuhn | scientific paradigm | scientific paradigm | liberalism | liberalism | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | Marxism | Marxism | corporate state | corporate state | social embeddedness | social embeddedness | economic activity | economic activity | The Fountainhead | The Fountainhead | Ayn Rand | Ayn Rand | Double Helix | Double Helix | James Watson | James Watson | Tracy Kidder | Tracy Kidder | Soul of the New Machine | Soul of the New Machine | industrial state | industrial state | individualism | individualism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata