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7.343 Photosynthesis: Life from Light (MIT) 7.343 Photosynthesis: Life from Light (MIT)

Description

In this course, you will journey through the web of physical, chemical, and biological reactions that collectively constitute photosynthesis. We will begin with light harvesting and follow photons to the sites of primary photochemistry: the photoreaction centers. A molecular-scale view will show in atomic detail how these protein complexes capture and energize electrons. Then we will follow the multiple pathways electrons take as they carry out their work. Consequent reactions, such as the synthesis of ATP and the reduction of CO2 during the synthesis of carbohydrates, will also be discussed in structural detail. Lastly, we will delve into the evolution of these systems and also discuss other photosynthetic strategies, such as light-driven proton pumps and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The co In this course, you will journey through the web of physical, chemical, and biological reactions that collectively constitute photosynthesis. We will begin with light harvesting and follow photons to the sites of primary photochemistry: the photoreaction centers. A molecular-scale view will show in atomic detail how these protein complexes capture and energize electrons. Then we will follow the multiple pathways electrons take as they carry out their work. Consequent reactions, such as the synthesis of ATP and the reduction of CO2 during the synthesis of carbohydrates, will also be discussed in structural detail. Lastly, we will delve into the evolution of these systems and also discuss other photosynthetic strategies, such as light-driven proton pumps and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The co

Subjects

photosynthesis | photosynthesis | life from light | life from light | conversion | conversion | solar energy | solar energy | chemical energy | chemical energy | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles | global warming | global warming | physical | physical | chemical and biological reactions | chemical and biological reactions | light harvesting | light harvesting | photochemistry | photochemistry | protein complexes | protein complexes | synthesis of ATP | synthesis of ATP | reduction of CO2 | reduction of CO2 | carbohydrates | carbohydrates | light-driven proton pumps | light-driven proton pumps | anoxygenic photosynthesis | anoxygenic photosynthesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about the Cultures of Food (MIT) 21W.730-4 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about the Cultures of Food (MIT)

Description

"What people do with food is an act that reveals how they construe the world." - Marcella Hazan, The Classic Italian Cookbook If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. In this class, we explore many of the fascinating issues that surround food as both material fact and personal and cultural symbol. We read essays by Toni Morrison, Michael Pollan, Wendell Berry, and others on such topics as family meals, eating as an "agricultural act" (Berry), slow food, and food's ability to awaken us to "our own powers of enjoyment" (M. F. K. Fisher). We will also read Pollan's most recent book, In Defense of Food, and discuss the issues it raises as well as "What people do with food is an act that reveals how they construe the world." - Marcella Hazan, The Classic Italian Cookbook If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. In this class, we explore many of the fascinating issues that surround food as both material fact and personal and cultural symbol. We read essays by Toni Morrison, Michael Pollan, Wendell Berry, and others on such topics as family meals, eating as an "agricultural act" (Berry), slow food, and food's ability to awaken us to "our own powers of enjoyment" (M. F. K. Fisher). We will also read Pollan's most recent book, In Defense of Food, and discuss the issues it raises as well as

Subjects

food | food | hunger | hunger | good calories | good calories | lipid hypothesis | lipid hypothesis | diet | diet | nutrients | nutrients | unhappy meals | unhappy meals | nutritionism | nutritionism | cuisine | cuisine | carbohydrates | carbohydrates | fats | fats | proteins | proteins | water | water | plants | plants | animals | animals | fungus or fermented products like alcohol | fungus or fermented products like alcohol | human cultures | human cultures | hunting and gathering | hunting and gathering | farming | farming | ranching | ranching | fishing | fishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about the Cultures of Food (MIT)

Description

"What people do with food is an act that reveals how they construe the world." - Marcella Hazan, The Classic Italian Cookbook If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. In this class, we explore many of the fascinating issues that surround food as both material fact and personal and cultural symbol. We read essays by Toni Morrison, Michael Pollan, Wendell Berry, and others on such topics as family meals, eating as an "agricultural act" (Berry), slow food, and food's ability to awaken us to "our own powers of enjoyment" (M. F. K. Fisher). We will also read Pollan's most recent book, In Defense of Food, and discuss the issues it raises as well as its rhetorical strategie

Subjects

food | hunger | good calories | lipid hypothesis | diet | nutrients | unhappy meals | nutritionism | cuisine | carbohydrates | fats | proteins | water | plants | animals | fungus or fermented products like alcohol | human cultures | hunting and gathering | farming | ranching | fishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 Photosynthesis: Life from Light (MIT)

Description

In this course, you will journey through the web of physical, chemical, and biological reactions that collectively constitute photosynthesis. We will begin with light harvesting and follow photons to the sites of primary photochemistry: the photoreaction centers. A molecular-scale view will show in atomic detail how these protein complexes capture and energize electrons. Then we will follow the multiple pathways electrons take as they carry out their work. Consequent reactions, such as the synthesis of ATP and the reduction of CO2 during the synthesis of carbohydrates, will also be discussed in structural detail. Lastly, we will delve into the evolution of these systems and also discuss other photosynthetic strategies, such as light-driven proton pumps and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The co

Subjects

photosynthesis | life from light | conversion | solar energy | chemical energy | biogeochemical cycles | global warming | physical | chemical and biological reactions | light harvesting | photochemistry | protein complexes | synthesis of ATP | reduction of CO2 | carbohydrates | light-driven proton pumps | anoxygenic photosynthesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Energy resources: An introduction to energy resources

Description

Energy resources are essential for any society, be it one dependent on subsistence farming or an industrialised country. There are many different sources of energy, some well-known such as coal or petroleum, others less so, such as tides or the heat inside the Earth. Is nuclear power a salvation or a nightmare? This unit provides background information to each resource, so that you can assess them for yourself.

Subjects

anoxic biomass carbohydrates energy density energy efficiency energy force fossil fuels fuels geesoer hydropower kinetic energy methane nuclear energy photosynthesis potential energy power primary energy renewable energy supplies residence time respiration solar energy ukoer work | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Biochemistry

Description

Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and compounds, such as cellular makeup, that bring about life in organisms. This course will look at how these formed biomolecules interact and produce many of life’s necessary processes. Also it will look at the most commonly used techniques in biochemistry research. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Biology 401; See also: Chemistry 109)

Subjects

biology | chemistry | biochemistry | amino acids | proteins | enzymes | carbohydrates | nucleic acids | lipids | metabolism | genes | chromosomes | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Organic Chemistry II

Description

This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I. The student will focus on the four most important classes of reactions: electrophilic substitution at aromatic rings, nucleophilic addition at carbonyl compounds, hydrolysis of carboxylic acids, and carbon-carbon bond formation using enolates. This course also introduces biological molecules, including carbohydrates, peptides and proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, from a molecular perspective. The student will learn how chemical reactions involving these molecules, especially oxidation and reduction reactions, form the basis of all life. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Chemistry 104; See also: Biology 108)

Subjects

organic chemistry | ethers | epoxides | thiols | sulfides | dienes | benzene | aromatic | amines | aldehydes | ketones | carboxylic acids | esters | amides | anydrides | acyl halides | enols | enolates | carbohydrates | lipids | amino acids | nucleic acids | spectroscopy | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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7.343 Photosynthesis: Life from Light (MIT)

Description

In this course, you will journey through the web of physical, chemical, and biological reactions that collectively constitute photosynthesis. We will begin with light harvesting and follow photons to the sites of primary photochemistry: the photoreaction centers. A molecular-scale view will show in atomic detail how these protein complexes capture and energize electrons. Then we will follow the multiple pathways electrons take as they carry out their work. Consequent reactions, such as the synthesis of ATP and the reduction of CO2 during the synthesis of carbohydrates, will also be discussed in structural detail. Lastly, we will delve into the evolution of these systems and also discuss other photosynthetic strategies, such as light-driven proton pumps and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The co

Subjects

photosynthesis | life from light | conversion | solar energy | chemical energy | biogeochemical cycles | global warming | physical | chemical and biological reactions | light harvesting | photochemistry | protein complexes | synthesis of ATP | reduction of CO2 | carbohydrates | light-driven proton pumps | anoxygenic photosynthesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about the Cultures of Food (MIT)

Description

"What people do with food is an act that reveals how they construe the world." - Marcella Hazan, The Classic Italian Cookbook If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. In this class, we explore many of the fascinating issues that surround food as both material fact and personal and cultural symbol. We read essays by Toni Morrison, Michael Pollan, Wendell Berry, and others on such topics as family meals, eating as an "agricultural act" (Berry), slow food, and food's ability to awaken us to "our own powers of enjoyment" (M. F. K. Fisher). We will also read Pollan's most recent book, In Defense of Food, and discuss the issues it raises as well as

Subjects

food | hunger | good calories | lipid hypothesis | diet | nutrients | unhappy meals | nutritionism | cuisine | carbohydrates | fats | proteins | water | plants | animals | fungus or fermented products like alcohol | human cultures | hunting and gathering | farming | ranching | fishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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