Searching for carburisation : 34 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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Fe, C 0.5 (wt%) steel, near a decarburised surface

Description

This is a hypoeutectoid steel (one that has a carbon composition below that of the eutectoid). During original cooling from high temperature, some ferrite was formed first on the prior austenite grain boundaries and the remaining carbon-enriched austenite then transformed to pearlite in a eutectoid reaction. The specimen was then exposed to a decarburising atmosphere (just air in this case). This might happen inadvertently, or it could be done deliberately if a softer surface is required for some reason. Material near the top of the micrograph, which was close to the free surface, is depleted in carbon and has become almost entirely ferritic. The depth to which there is significant carbon depletion depends on the time and temperature of the decarburisation treatment. It is given approximat

Subjects

alloy | carbon | decarburisation | hypoeutectoid | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

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Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.07, Mn 2.3 (wt%) steel, carburised at 950°C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.07, Mn 2.3 (wt%) steel, carburised at 950°C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.07, Mn 2.3 (wt%) steel, carburised at 950°C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.07, Mn 2.3 (wt%) steel, carburised at 950°C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.07, Mn 2.3 (wt%) steel, carburised at 950°C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.07, Mn 2.3 (wt%) steel, carburised at 950°C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.07, Mn 2.3 (wt%) steel, carburised at 950°C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.2 (wt%) steel, case hardened

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.2 (wt%) steel, case hardened

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. This micrograph has been taken from the bulk of the sample, showing that carbon does not diffuse significantly into the interior of a case hardened steel.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.2 (wt%) steel, case hardened

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. This micrograph has been taken from the bulk of the sample, showing that carbon does not diffuse significantly into the interior of a case hardened steel.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.2 (wt%) steel, case hardened

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. This micrograph has been taken from the bulk of the sample, showing that carbon does not diffuse significantly into the interior of a case hardened steel.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Chromitised low carbon steel

Description

Low carbon steel that has had additional chromium added. Chromium increases response to heat treatment and increases depth of hardness penetration.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.15 (wt%) steel, carburised

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. This micrograph has been taken from the bulk of the sample, showing that carbon does not diffuse significantly into the interior of a case hardened steel.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.15 (wt%) steel, carburised

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. This micrograph has been taken from the bulk of the sample, showing that carbon does not diffuse significantly into the interior of a case hardened steel.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.15 (wt%) steel, carburised

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. This micrograph has been taken from the bulk of the sample, showing that carbon does not diffuse significantly into the interior of a case hardened steel.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.15 (wt%) steel, carburised

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the right (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Fe, C 0.5 (wt%) steel, near a decarburised surface

Description

This is a hypoeutectoid steel (one that has a carbon composition below that of the eutectoid). During original cooling from high temperature, some ferrite was formed first on the prior austenite grain boundaries and the remaining carbon-enriched austenite then transformed to pearlite in a eutectoid reaction. The specimen was then exposed to a decarburising atmosphere (just air in this case). This might happen inadvertently, or it could be done deliberately if a softer surface is required for some reason. Material near the top of the micrograph, which was close to the free surface, is depleted in carbon and has become almost entirely ferritic. The depth to which there is significant carbon depletion depends on the time and temperature of the decarburisation treatment. It is given approxima

Subjects

alloy | carbon | decarburisation | hypoeutectoid | iron | metal | steel | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

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C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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C

Description

After initial casting of this steel it was subject to a process known as carburisation. The metal is heated to above the ferrite-austenite transition in a carbon atmosphere. This establishes a concentration gradient and hence carbon diffuses into the steel. Usually the steel is then hardened by quenching. This produces what is known as a case hardened steel - with a hard surface (case) surrounding a tough core. The carbon gradient can be seen in the changing shade of the sample from left to right, with high carbon concentration at the left (surface) and hence a martensitic phase, changing to the lighter shade consisting of mostly ferrite.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | carburisation | iron | metal | steel | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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