Searching for caribbean : 33 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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Amanulu de Remy of the Haitian Rara band Konbo Guinyn performing in Miami Amanulu de Remy of the Haitian Rara band Konbo Guinyn performing in Miami

Description

Subjects

musicians | musicians | women | women | singing | singing | florida | florida | miami | miami | performingarts | performingarts | hats | hats | singers | singers | womenmusicians | womenmusicians | miamidadecounty | miamidadecounty | personaladornment | personaladornment | domesticarts | domesticarts | artsperforming | artsperforming | musicalintstruments | musicalintstruments | musicaltraditions | musicaltraditions | ethnicityhaitian | ethnicityhaitian | musicaltraditionshaitian | musicaltraditionshaitian | konboguinynmusicalgroup | konboguinynmusicalgroup | deremyamanulu | deremyamanulu | musicaltraditionslatinamericanandcaribbean | musicaltraditionslatinamericanandcaribbean | songshaitian | songshaitian | ethnicitylatinamericanandcaribbean | ethnicitylatinamericanandcaribbean | haitianamericanentertainers | haitianamericanentertainers | saltzmanrikicollector | saltzmanrikicollector | haitianamericanmusicians | haitianamericanmusicians

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Aime Cesaire and Derek Walcott

Description

In this audio podcast from the University of Oxford, Jason Allen offers a comparative discussion of two important Caribbean poets and playwrights, Aime Cesaire and Derek Walcott, to emphasize the impact of Caribbean literature upon the postcolonial world. By using biographical and historical detail to support his analysis of some of Cesaire and Walcott's key texts, Allen offers insight into what it means to be a Caribbean writer - looking back to a colonial past, and forward to a global future

Subjects

hybridity | postcolonial literature | greatwriters | playwrights | drama | theatre | poets | caribbean literature | aime cesaire | derek walcott | caribbean poetry | caribbean plays | black history month | bhm | black artists | black culture | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT) 21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT)

Description

This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City. This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City.

Subjects

immigration | immigration | migration | migration | lawrence | lawrence | chinatown | chinatown | U.S.-Mexico border | U.S.-Mexico border | Great Migration | Great Migration | The Jazz Singer | The Jazz Singer | Lower East Side | Lower East Side | ethnicity | ethnicity | New York City | New York City | New Immigration | New Immigration | Filipino | Filipino | american imperialism | american imperialism | cuban-american | cuban-american | multiculturalism | multiculturalism | caribbean migration | caribbean migration | asian immigration | asian immigration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.007 World Literatures: Travel Writing (MIT) 21L.007 World Literatures: Travel Writing (MIT)

Description

This semester, we will read writing about travel and place from Columbus's Diario through the present. Travel writing has some special features that will shape both the content and the work for this subject: reflecting the point of view, narrative choices, and style of individuals, it also responds to the pressures of a real world only marginally under their control. Whether the traveler is a curious tourist, the leader of a national expedition, or a starving, half-naked survivor, the encounter with place shapes what travel writing can be. Accordingly, we will pay attention not only to narrative texts but to maps, objects, archives, and facts of various kinds. Our materials are organized around three regions: North America, Africa and the Atlantic world, the Arctic and Antarctic. The hist This semester, we will read writing about travel and place from Columbus's Diario through the present. Travel writing has some special features that will shape both the content and the work for this subject: reflecting the point of view, narrative choices, and style of individuals, it also responds to the pressures of a real world only marginally under their control. Whether the traveler is a curious tourist, the leader of a national expedition, or a starving, half-naked survivor, the encounter with place shapes what travel writing can be. Accordingly, we will pay attention not only to narrative texts but to maps, objects, archives, and facts of various kinds. Our materials are organized around three regions: North America, Africa and the Atlantic world, the Arctic and Antarctic. The hist

Subjects

world | world | travel | travel | writing | writing | columbus | columbus | literature | literature | north america | north america | french | french | history | history | europe | europe | caribbean | caribbean | brazil | brazil | modern | modern | religion | religion | ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | shakespeare | shakespeare | defoe | defoe | rowlandson | rowlandson | walcott | walcott | montaigne | montaigne | de lery | de lery | coetzee | coetzee | essay | essay | narrative | narrative | novel | novel | poetry | poetry | drama | drama | film | film | report | report

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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INF 10-354-14

Description

Subjects

airplane | aircraft | aviation | rr | rollsroyce | caribbean | airlines | stewardess | airliners | stewardesses | bwee | viscount | bwia | vickersviscount | cn235 | vickersarmstrongs | rollsroycedart | thenationalarchivesuk | britishwestindianairways | caribbeanthroughalens | vptbs | 9ytbs | rollsroycedart506 | dart506 | vickersviscount772 | viscount772 | tna:SeriesReference=inf10 | tna:DivisionReference=infd1 | tna:DepartmentReference=inf | tna:PieceReference=inf10p354 | tna:IAID=c12275267 | tna:ItemReference=inf10p354i14 | tna:SubseriesReference=inf10ss43

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21L.007J After Columbus (MIT) 21L.007J After Columbus (MIT)

Description

Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres

Subjects

21L.007 | 21L.007 | 21G.020 | 21G.020 | columbus | columbus | literature | literature | north | america | north | america | french | french | history | history | europe | europe | caribbean | caribbean | brazil | brazil | modern | modern | religion | religion | ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | shakespeare | shakespeare | defoe | defoe | rowlandson | rowlandson | walcott | walcott | montaigne | montaigne | de lery | de lery | coetzee | coetzee | essay | essay | narrative | narrative | novel | novel | poetry | poetry | drama | drama | film | film | report | report | north america | north america | New World | New World | America | America | Native Americans | Native Americans | English | English | Europeans | Europeans | North America | North America | literary transformations | literary transformations | nation | nation | captivity narratives | captivity narratives | Michel Montaigne | Michel Montaigne | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Jean de L?ry | Jean de L?ry | Daniel Defoe | Daniel Defoe | Mary Rowlandson | Mary Rowlandson | Derek Walcott | Derek Walcott | J. M. Coetzee | J. M. Coetzee | Christopher Columbus | Christopher Columbus | 21F.020J | 21F.020J | 21F.020 | 21F.020

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Vanley Burke

Description

This resource is part of the Connecting Histories resource, and draws on the collections of Birmingham City Archives. Vanley Burke was born in the parish of St. Thomas, Jamaica, in 1951. He was sent a camera from his parents, who were living in England, for his 10th birthday. In 1965 he came to England to join his parents and had a choice between leaving his aunt his radio or his camera as a parting gift. He left her his radio. He began photography in earnest from around 1967 and made a conscious decision to document the Black community. The photographs capture his own experiences of being newly arrived in Britain, his encounters with the different landscape and ways of living, and the experiences of the wider African Caribbean community

Subjects

photography | immigrants | integration | identity | archives | black britons | vanley burke | african caribbean photographers | african caribbean community | black history | black history month | bhm | jamaica | black community | jamaican photographers | black artists | black photographers | great britain | vanley burke archive | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Caribbean Resource Centre (ACRC) website

Description

ACRC is a community based mental health service which promotes independence, choice and general well being of its service users. This is a project for students with the College of North West London. The idea is to post pictures and descriptions of the students to this blog, and so create a class website. Zipped.

Subjects

website | blog | african | caribbean | resource | acrc | INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY and INFORMATION | C

License

Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | creole | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | identity | africa | europe | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | colony | colonial | dialect | grench | new world | slavery | lexicon | pidgin | culture | religion | music | literature | ethnicity | text | syntax | morphology | uniformity | ebonics | africal-american english | gullah | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Florida lobster caught off Old Rhodes Key

Description

Subjects

homes | men | florida | hats | lobster | caribbeanspinylobster | oldrhodeskey

License

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21L.007 World Literatures: Travel Writing (MIT)

Description

This semester, we will read writing about travel and place from Columbus's Diario through the present. Travel writing has some special features that will shape both the content and the work for this subject: reflecting the point of view, narrative choices, and style of individuals, it also responds to the pressures of a real world only marginally under their control. Whether the traveler is a curious tourist, the leader of a national expedition, or a starving, half-naked survivor, the encounter with place shapes what travel writing can be. Accordingly, we will pay attention not only to narrative texts but to maps, objects, archives, and facts of various kinds. Our materials are organized around three regions: North America, Africa and the Atlantic world, the Arctic and Antarctic. The hist

Subjects

world | travel | writing | columbus | literature | north america | french | history | europe | caribbean | brazil | modern | religion | ethnicity | culture | shakespeare | defoe | rowlandson | walcott | montaigne | de lery | coetzee | essay | narrative | novel | poetry | drama | film | report

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.007J After Columbus (MIT)

Description

Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres

Subjects

21L.007 | 21G.020 | columbus | literature | north | america | french | history | europe | caribbean | brazil | modern | religion | ethnicity | culture | shakespeare | defoe | rowlandson | walcott | montaigne | de lery | coetzee | essay | narrative | novel | poetry | drama | film | report | north america | New World | America | Native Americans | English | Europeans | North America | literary transformations | nation | captivity narratives | Michel Montaigne | William Shakespeare | Jean de L?ry | Daniel Defoe | Mary Rowlandson | Derek Walcott | J. M. Coetzee | Christopher Columbus | 21F.020J | 21F.020

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Bound for Britain: experiences of immigration to the UK

Description

Between 1948 and 1970 nearly half a million people left their homes in the West Indies to live in Britain. The West Indies consists of more than 20 islands in the Caribbean, including Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad. These people changed the face of modern Britain. They were all British citizens and, although they had never lived in Britain before, they had the right to enter, work and settle here if they wanted to. West Indians came to Britain for many different reasons. Some were seeking better opportunities for themselves and their children. Some came to work for a while, save money and return home. Some had been recruited because Britain was short of workers to run the transport system, postal service and hospitals. Other West Indians were returning soldiers who had fought for Britain d

Subjects

immigration | opportunities | opportunity | settle | history | heritage | west indian | african caribbean | jamaica | barbados | trinidad | british | british citizens | black african | black history | black history month | bhm | black britons | black leaders | black activists | black communities | black business | black scholarship | black integration | black culture | black identity | black civil rights | african | britain | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Windrush settlers

Description

At the end of the Second World War, Britain was busy rebuilding. The government was thinking about recruiting workers from the Caribbean to cope with the shortage of labour in some British industries. In 1948, an advertisement appeared in a Jamaican newspaper. It stated that there were 300 places on board Windrush for anyone wishing to travel to Britain. The arrival of the Windrush was the start of a period of migration from the Caribbean to Britain that did not slow down until 1962. By 1955, 18,000 Jamaicans had moved to Britain. This outward flow of people to settle in Britain was an important event in the history of the West Indies. It also changed the social landscape of Britain

Subjects

immigration | culture change | culture | ethnicity | sport | success | ethnic | cultural differences | nationality | prejudice | stereotype | history | presence | heritage | windrush | jamaica | jamaicans | african caribbean | black culture | brixton | west indies | race | black african | black history | black history month | bhm | british asian history | british asians | black britons | black leaders | black artists | black activists | black photographers | black communities | black and asian presence | black business | black entrepreneurship | black scholarship | black integration | black identity | black civil rights | african | asian | britain | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Coolies Preparing Rice, Jamaica

Description

Subjects

workers | caribbean | indians | laborers | vision:outdoor=0856

License

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On The Road To Castleton, Jamaica

Description

Subjects

mountains | men | workers | women | palmtrees | caribbean | vision:outdoor=0809

License

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[A House in Trinidad]

Description

Subjects

houses | people | buildings | caribbean | vision:sky=0731 | vision:outdoor=0954

License

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Cane Cutters, Jamaica

Description

Subjects

men | workers | women | caribbean | sugarcane | laborers | sugarplantations | vision:outdoor=0959

License

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[Laborers, Trinidad]

Description

Subjects

men | children | workers | women | caribbean | indians | vision:outdoor=0931

License

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[East Indian Women, Men and Children]

Description

Subjects

men | children | women | caribbean | eastindia | vision:outdoor=0971

License

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[Indian Man, Trinidad]

Description

Subjects

men | caribbean | indians

License

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[Woman, Trinidad]

Description

Subjects

women | jewelry | caribbean | indians | nativecostume

License

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[East Indian Milk Seller, Trinidad]

Description

Subjects

portraits | trinidad | caribbean | indians | indianwomen | nativecostume

License

No known copyright restrictions

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