Searching for cell : 1190 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

20.320 Biomolecular Kinetics and Cell Dynamics (MIT) 20.320 Biomolecular Kinetics and Cell Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This class covers analysis of kinetics and dynamics of molecular and cellular processes across a hierarchy of scales, including intracellular, extracellular, and cell population levels; a spectrum of biotechnology applications are also taken into consideration. Topics include gene regulation networks; nucleic acid hybridization; signal transduction pathways; and cell populations in tissues and bioreactors. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling. This class covers analysis of kinetics and dynamics of molecular and cellular processes across a hierarchy of scales, including intracellular, extracellular, and cell population levels; a spectrum of biotechnology applications are also taken into consideration. Topics include gene regulation networks; nucleic acid hybridization; signal transduction pathways; and cell populations in tissues and bioreactors. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling.

Subjects

kinetics of molecular processes | kinetics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | intracellular scale | intracellular scale | extracellular scale | extracellular scale | and cell population scale | and cell population scale | biotechnology applications | biotechnology applications | gene regulation networks | gene regulation networks | nucleic acid hybridization | nucleic acid hybridization | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in bioreactors | cell populations in bioreactors | experimental methods | experimental methods | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | computational modeling | computational modeling | cell population scale | cell population scale

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

20.310J Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics (MIT) 20.310J Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics (MIT)

Description

This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum and statistical mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales, from molecular to cellular to tissue or organ level. This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum and statistical mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales, from molecular to cellular to tissue or organ level.

Subjects

biomechanics | biomechanics | molecular mechanics | molecular mechanics | cell mechanics | cell mechanics | Brownian motion | Brownian motion | Reynolds numbers | Reynolds numbers | mechanochemistry | mechanochemistry | Kramers' model | Kramers' model | Bell model | Bell model | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | poroelasticity | poroelasticity | optical tweezers | optical tweezers | extracellular matrix | extracellular matrix | collagen | collagen | proteoglycan | proteoglycan | cell membrane | cell membrane | cell motility | cell motility | mechanotransduction | mechanotransduction | cancer | cancer | biological systems | biological systems | molecular biology | molecular biology | cell biology | cell biology | cytoskeleton | cytoskeleton | cell | cell | biophysics | biophysics | cell migration | cell migration | biomembrane | biomembrane | tissue mechanics | tissue mechanics | rheology | rheology | polymer | polymer | length scale | length scale | muscle mechanics | muscle mechanics | experimental methods | experimental methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

20.320 Analysis of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems (MIT) 20.320 Analysis of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on computational and experimental analysis of biological systems across a hierarchy of scales, including genetic, molecular, cellular, and cell population levels. The two central themes of the course are modeling of complex dynamic systems and protein design and engineering. Topics include gene sequence analysis, molecular modeling, metabolic and gene regulation networks, signal transduction pathways and cell populations in tissues. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling. This course focuses on computational and experimental analysis of biological systems across a hierarchy of scales, including genetic, molecular, cellular, and cell population levels. The two central themes of the course are modeling of complex dynamic systems and protein design and engineering. Topics include gene sequence analysis, molecular modeling, metabolic and gene regulation networks, signal transduction pathways and cell populations in tissues. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling.

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | kinase | kinase | PyMOL | PyMOL | PyRosetta | PyRosetta | MATLAB | MATLAB | Michaelis-Menten | Michaelis-Menten | bioreactor | bioreactor | bromodomain | bromodomain | protein-ligand interactions | protein-ligand interactions | titration analysis | titration analysis | fractional separation | fractional separation | isothermal titration calorimetry | isothermal titration calorimetry | ITC | ITC | mass spectrometry | mass spectrometry | MS | MS | co-immunoprecipitation | co-immunoprecipitation | Co-IP | Co-IP | Forster resonance energy transfer | Forster resonance energy transfer | FRET | FRET | primary ligation assay | primary ligation assay | PLA | PLA | surface plasmon resonance | surface plasmon resonance | SPR | SPR | enzyme kinetics | enzyme kinetics | kinase engineering | kinase engineering | competitive inhibition | competitive inhibition | epidermal growth factor receptor | epidermal growth factor receptor | mitogen-activated protein kinase | mitogen-activated protein kinase | MAPK | MAPK | genome editing | genome editing | Imatinib | Imatinib | Gleevec | Gleevec | Glivec | Glivec | drug delivery | drug delivery | kinetics of molecular processes | kinetics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | intracellular scale | intracellular scale | extracellular scale | extracellular scale | and cell population scale | and cell population scale | biotechnology applications | biotechnology applications | gene regulation networks | gene regulation networks | nucleic acid hybridization | nucleic acid hybridization | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in bioreactors | cell populations in bioreactors | experimental methods | experimental methods | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | computational modeling | computational modeling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.06 Cell Biology (MIT) 7.06 Cell Biology (MIT)

Description

This course deals with the biology of cells of higher organisms: The structure, function, and biosynthesis of cellular membranes and organelles; cell growth and oncogenic transformation; transport, receptors, and cell signaling; the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix, and cell movements; chromatin structure and RNA synthesis. This course deals with the biology of cells of higher organisms: The structure, function, and biosynthesis of cellular membranes and organelles; cell growth and oncogenic transformation; transport, receptors, and cell signaling; the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix, and cell movements; chromatin structure and RNA synthesis.

Subjects

Biology | Biology | cells | cells | organisms | organisms | biosynthesis | biosynthesis | cellular membranes | cellular membranes | organelles | organelles | cell growth | cell growth | oncogenic transformation | oncogenic transformation | transport | transport | receptors | receptors | cell signaling | cell signaling | cytoskeleton | cytoskeleton | extracellular matrix | extracellular matrix | matrix | matrix | cell movements | cell movements | chromatin | chromatin | RNA | RNA | RNA synthesis | RNA synthesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.785J Cell-Matrix Mechanics (MIT) 2.785J Cell-Matrix Mechanics (MIT)

Description

Mechanical forces play a decisive role during development of tissues and organs, during remodeling following injury as well as in normal function. A stress field influences cell function primarily through deformation of the extracellular matrix to which cells are attached. Deformed cells express different biosynthetic activity relative to undeformed cells. The unit cell process paradigm combined with topics in connective tissue mechanics form the basis for discussions of several topics from cell biology, physiology, and medicine. Mechanical forces play a decisive role during development of tissues and organs, during remodeling following injury as well as in normal function. A stress field influences cell function primarily through deformation of the extracellular matrix to which cells are attached. Deformed cells express different biosynthetic activity relative to undeformed cells. The unit cell process paradigm combined with topics in connective tissue mechanics form the basis for discussions of several topics from cell biology, physiology, and medicine.

Subjects

2.785 | 2.785 | 3.97 | 3.97 | 20.411 | 20.411 | HST.523 | HST.523 | cell | cell | matrix | matrix | mechanics | mechanics | tissue | tissue | organ | organ | development | development | injury | injury | stress field | stress field | cell function | cell function | deformed cells | deformed cells | biosynthetic activity | biosynthetic activity | unit cell | unit cell | connective tissue | connective tissue | cell biology | cell biology | physiology | physiology | medicine | medicine | cytoplasm | cytoplasm | extracellular matrix | extracellular matrix | skeleton | skeleton | bone | bone

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.523J Cell-Matrix Mechanics (MIT) HST.523J Cell-Matrix Mechanics (MIT)

Description

Mechanical forces play a decisive role during development of tissues and organs, during remodeling following injury as well as in normal function. A stress field influences cell function primarily through deformation of the extracellular matrix to which cells are attached. Deformed cells express different biosynthetic activity relative to undeformed cells. The unit cell process paradigm combined with topics in connective tissue mechanics form the basis for discussions of several topics from cell biology, physiology, and medicine. Mechanical forces play a decisive role during development of tissues and organs, during remodeling following injury as well as in normal function. A stress field influences cell function primarily through deformation of the extracellular matrix to which cells are attached. Deformed cells express different biosynthetic activity relative to undeformed cells. The unit cell process paradigm combined with topics in connective tissue mechanics form the basis for discussions of several topics from cell biology, physiology, and medicine.

Subjects

cell | cell | tissue | tissue | organ | organ | unit cell process | unit cell process | cell matrix | cell matrix | tissue structure | tissue structure | extracellular matrix | extracellular matrix | adhesion protein | adhesion protein | integrin | integrin | cell force | cell force | cell contraction | cell contraction | healing | healing | skin | skin | scar | scar | tendon | tendon | ligament | ligament | cartilage | cartilage | bone | bone | collagen | collagen | muscle | muscle | nerve | nerve | implant | implant | HST.523 | HST.523 | 2.785 | 2.785 | 3.97 | 3.97 | 20.411 | 20.411

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT) 7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT)

Description

The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an

Subjects

DNA | DNA | damage checkpoints | damage checkpoints | cancer | cancer | cells | cells | human cells | human cells | exogenous | exogenous | endogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | checkpoints | gene | gene | signaling | signaling | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer prevention | cancer prevention | primary sources | primary sources | discussion | discussion | DNA damage | DNA damage | molecular | molecular | enzyme | enzyme | cell cycle | cell cycle | extracellular cues | extracellular cues | growth factors | growth factors | Cdk regulation | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | p53 | tumor suppressor | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | apoptosis | MDC1 | MDC1 | H2AX | H2AX | Rad50 | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | Chk1 | mutant | mutant

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT) 7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT)

Description

Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching. Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

DNA | DNA | damage checkpoints | damage checkpoints | cancer | cancer | cells | cells | human cells | human cells | exogenous | exogenous | endogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | checkpoints | gene | gene | signaling | signaling | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer prevention | cancer prevention | primary sources | primary sources | discussion | discussion | DNA damage | DNA damage | molecular | molecular | enzyme | enzyme | cell cycle | cell cycle | extracellular cues | extracellular cues | growth factors | growth factors | Cdk regulation | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | p53 | tumor suppressor | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | apoptosis | MDC1 | MDC1 | H2AX | H2AX | Rad50 | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | Chk1 | mutant | mutant

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT) 7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT)

Description

In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f

Subjects

cell | cell | genetic material | genetic material | cell death | cell death | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | mutations | mutations | genes | genes | DNA replication | DNA replication | cell cycle | cell cycle | damaged DNA | damaged DNA | genome | genome | tumor formation | tumor formation | anti-cancer drugs | anti-cancer drugs | viruses | viruses | cellular controls | cellular controls

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.340 Immune Evasion: How Sneaky Pathogens Avoid Host Surveillance (MIT) 7.340 Immune Evasion: How Sneaky Pathogens Avoid Host Surveillance (MIT)

Description

Every infection consists of a battle between the invading pathogen and the resisting host. To be successful, a pathogen must escape the many defenses of the host immune system until it can replicate and spread to another host. A pathogen must prevent one of three stages of immune function: detection, activation, or effector function. Examples of disease-specific immune evasion and the mechanisms used by pathogens to prevail over their hosts' immune systems are discussed. Also considered is what these host-pathogen interactions reveal about the normal function of the immune system and basic cell biological processes, such as protein maturation and degradation. Every infection consists of a battle between the invading pathogen and the resisting host. To be successful, a pathogen must escape the many defenses of the host immune system until it can replicate and spread to another host. A pathogen must prevent one of three stages of immune function: detection, activation, or effector function. Examples of disease-specific immune evasion and the mechanisms used by pathogens to prevail over their hosts' immune systems are discussed. Also considered is what these host-pathogen interactions reveal about the normal function of the immune system and basic cell biological processes, such as protein maturation and degradation.

Subjects

immunology | immunology | immune system | immune system | immune evasion | immune evasion | pathogen | pathogen | effector function | effector function | infections | infections | Human cytomegalovirus | Human cytomegalovirus | Human Immunodeficiency Virus | Human Immunodeficiency Virus | CD4 cells | CD4 cells | CD8 cells | CD8 cells | T cells | T cells | surace receptors | surace receptors | cell lysis | cell lysis | host-pathogen interactions | host-pathogen interactions | host surveillance | host surveillance | antibodies | antibodies | MHC class I | MHC class I | blood-borne pathogens | blood-borne pathogens | macrophages | macrophages | phagocytosis | phagocytosis | endocytosis | endocytosis | degradation | degradation | antigen | antigen | apoptosis | apoptosis | cytokines | cytokines | immune response | immune response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT) 22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT)

Description

The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi

Subjects

Interaction of radiation with biological material | Interaction of radiation with biological material | how different types of radiation deposit energy | how different types of radiation deposit energy | secondary radiations | secondary radiations | how radiation affects cells | how radiation affects cells | biological effects | biological effects | effects of radiation on biological systems | effects of radiation on biological systems | DNA damage | DNA damage | in vitro cell survival models | in vitro cell survival models | in vivo mammalian systems | in vivo mammalian systems | radiation therapy | radiation therapy | radiation syndromes in humans | radiation syndromes in humans | carcinogenesis | carcinogenesis | Environmental radiation sources | Environmental radiation sources | radiation protection | radiation protection | cells | cells | tissues | tissues | radiation interactions | radiation interactions | radiation chemistry | radiation chemistry | LET | LET | tracks | tracks | chromosome damags | chromosome damags | in vivo | in vivo | in vitro | in vitro | cell survival curves | cell survival curves | dose response | dose response | RBE | RBE | clustered damage | clustered damage | radiation response | radiation response | tumor kinetics | tumor kinetics | tumor radiobiology | tumor radiobiology | fractionation | fractionation | protons | protons | alpha particles | alpha particles | whole body exposure | whole body exposure | chronic exposure | chronic exposure | space | space | microbeams | microbeams | radon | radon | background radiation | background radiation | 22.55 | 22.55 | HST.560 | HST.560

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer),

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer),

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.014 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.014 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health

Subjects

microorganisms | microorganisms | geochemistry | geochemistry | geochemical agents | geochemical agents | biosphere | biosphere | bacterial genetics | bacterial genetics | carbon metabolism | carbon metabolism | energy metabolism | energy metabolism | productivity | productivity | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles | molecular evolution | molecular evolution | population genetics | population genetics | evolution | evolution | population growth | population growth | biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | ecology | ecology | communities | communities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT) 7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.012 focuses on the exploration of current research in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, genomics, and molecular medicine.AcknowledgmentsThe study materials, problem sets, and quiz materials used during Fall 2004 for The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.012 focuses on the exploration of current research in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, genomics, and molecular medicine.AcknowledgmentsThe study materials, problem sets, and quiz materials used during Fall 2004 for

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

20.320 Biomolecular Kinetics and Cell Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This class covers analysis of kinetics and dynamics of molecular and cellular processes across a hierarchy of scales, including intracellular, extracellular, and cell population levels; a spectrum of biotechnology applications are also taken into consideration. Topics include gene regulation networks; nucleic acid hybridization; signal transduction pathways; and cell populations in tissues and bioreactors. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling.

Subjects

kinetics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | intracellular scale | extracellular scale | and cell population scale | biotechnology applications | gene regulation networks | nucleic acid hybridization | signal transduction pathways | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in bioreactors | experimental methods | quantitative analysis | computational modeling | cell population scale

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT) 7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT)

Description

All three courses: 7.012, 7.013 and 7.014 cover the same core material which includes: the fundamental principles of biochemistry as they apply to introductory biology, genetics, molecular biology, basic recombinant DNA technology, and gene regulation.In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material, described below. Note: All three versions require a familiarity with some basic chemistry. For details, see the Chemistry Self-evaluation.7.012 focuses on cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, and includes an exploration into current research in cancer, genomics, and molecular medicine. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of cells, human genetics and diseases, infectious agents, cancer, immunology, molecular All three courses: 7.012, 7.013 and 7.014 cover the same core material which includes: the fundamental principles of biochemistry as they apply to introductory biology, genetics, molecular biology, basic recombinant DNA technology, and gene regulation.In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material, described below. Note: All three versions require a familiarity with some basic chemistry. For details, see the Chemistry Self-evaluation.7.012 focuses on cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, and includes an exploration into current research in cancer, genomics, and molecular medicine. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of cells, human genetics and diseases, infectious agents, cancer, immunology, molecular

Subjects

amino acids | amino acids | biochemistry | biochemistry | cancer | cancer | cell biology | cell biology | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | DNA | DNA | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | gene regulation | gene regulation | gene structure | gene structure | genetics | genetics | genomics | genomics | immunology | immunology | molecular biology | molecular biology | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | mRNA | mRNA | nervous system | nervous system | neurobiology | neurobiology | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | protein localization | protein localization | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | proteins | proteins | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | replication | replication | ribosome | ribosome | RNA | RNA | stem cells | stem cells | transcription | transcription | translation | translation | virology | virology | biology | biology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.410J Projects in Microscale Engineering for the Life Sciences (MIT) HST.410J Projects in Microscale Engineering for the Life Sciences (MIT)

Description

This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building. This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building.

Subjects

HST.410 | HST.410 | 6.07 | 6.07 | cell manipulation | cell manipulation | microchips | microchips | lithography | lithography | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | optical imaging of cells | optical imaging of cells | cell sorting | cell sorting | microfluidics | microfluidics | osmosis | osmosis | diffusion | diffusion | microfabrication | microfabrication | models of diffusion | models of diffusion | laminar flow | laminar flow | MATLAB data analysis | MATLAB data analysis | cell traps | cell traps | experimental design | experimental design | cytometry techniques | cytometry techniques | computer simulation of neural behavior | computer simulation of neural behavior | casting PDMS | casting PDMS | coulter counter | coulter counter | plasma bonding | plasma bonding

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-HST.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

20.320 Biomolecular Kinetics and Cell Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This class covers analysis of kinetics and dynamics of molecular and cellular processes across a hierarchy of scales, including intracellular, extracellular, and cell population levels; a spectrum of biotechnology applications are also taken into consideration. Topics include gene regulation networks; nucleic acid hybridization; signal transduction pathways; and cell populations in tissues and bioreactors. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling.

Subjects

kinetics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | intracellular scale | extracellular scale | and cell population scale | biotechnology applications | gene regulation networks | nucleic acid hybridization | signal transduction pathways | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in bioreactors | experimental methods | quantitative analysis | computational modeling | cell population scale

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT) 9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

This course begins with the study of nerve cells which includes their structure, the propagation of nerve impulses and transfer of information between nerve cells, the effect of drugs on this process, and the development of nerve cells into the brain and spinal cord. Next, sensory systems such as hearing, vision and touch are covered as well as a discussion on how physical energy such as light is converted into neural signals, where these signals travel in the brain and how they are processed. Other topics include the control of voluntary movement, the neurochemical bases of brain diseases, and those systems which control sleep and consciousness, learning and memory. This course begins with the study of nerve cells which includes their structure, the propagation of nerve impulses and transfer of information between nerve cells, the effect of drugs on this process, and the development of nerve cells into the brain and spinal cord. Next, sensory systems such as hearing, vision and touch are covered as well as a discussion on how physical energy such as light is converted into neural signals, where these signals travel in the brain and how they are processed. Other topics include the control of voluntary movement, the neurochemical bases of brain diseases, and those systems which control sleep and consciousness, learning and memory.

Subjects

neuroscience | neuroscience | vision | vision | hearing | hearing | neuroanatomy | neuroanatomy | color vision | color vision | blind spot | blind spot | retinal phototransduction | retinal phototransduction | center-surround receptive fields | center-surround receptive fields | corticalmaps | corticalmaps | primary visual cortex | primary visual cortex | simple cells | simple cells | complex cells | complex cells | extrastriate cortex | extrastriate cortex | ear | ear | cochlea | cochlea | basilar membrane | basilar membrane | auditory transduction | auditory transduction | hair cells | hair cells | phase-locking | phase-locking | tonotopy | tonotopy | sound localization | sound localization | auditory cortex | auditory cortex | somatosensory system | somatosensory system | motor system | motor system | synaptic transmission | synaptic transmission | action potential | action potential | sympathetic neurons | sympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | cellual neurophysiology | cellual neurophysiology | learning | learning | memory | memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Immunology basics Immunology basics

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn semester 2009 Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The body fights infection through the functions of the immune system, whose power has been harnessed by the development of vaccination (immunisation). Suitable for study at: Undergraduate levels 1 and 2. Dr Ian Todd, School of Molecular Medical Sciences Dr Ian Todd is Associate Professor & Reader in Cellular Immunopathology at The University of Nottingham. After reading Biochemistry at The University of Oxford, he carried out research for his PhD in Immunology at University College London. He then undertook post-doctoral research at The Oregon Health Sciences University and The Middlesex Hospital Medica This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn semester 2009 Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The body fights infection through the functions of the immune system, whose power has been harnessed by the development of vaccination (immunisation). Suitable for study at: Undergraduate levels 1 and 2. Dr Ian Todd, School of Molecular Medical Sciences Dr Ian Todd is Associate Professor & Reader in Cellular Immunopathology at The University of Nottingham. After reading Biochemistry at The University of Oxford, he carried out research for his PhD in Immunology at University College London. He then undertook post-doctoral research at The Oregon Health Sciences University and The Middlesex Hospital Medica

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Immunology | Immunology | Introduction to immunology | Introduction to immunology | Recognition of extracellular pathogens | Recognition of extracellular pathogens | Defence against extracellular pathogens | Defence against extracellular pathogens | T cell-mediated immunity | T cell-mediated immunity | Helper T cells and cytokines | Helper T cells and cytokines | Immunity to viruses | Immunity to viruses

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), developmental biology, neurobiology and evolution.Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized in all courses and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In add The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), developmental biology, neurobiology and evolution.Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized in all courses and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In add

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.347 Fueling Sustainability: Engineering Microbial Systems for Biofuel Production (MIT) 7.347 Fueling Sustainability: Engineering Microbial Systems for Biofuel Production (MIT)

Description

The need to identify sustainable forms of energy as an alternative to our dependence on depleting worldwide oil reserves is one of the grand challenges of our time. The energy from the sun converted into plant biomass is the most promising renewable resource available to humanity. This seminar will examine each of the critical steps along the pathway towards the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in The need to identify sustainable forms of energy as an alternative to our dependence on depleting worldwide oil reserves is one of the grand challenges of our time. The energy from the sun converted into plant biomass is the most promising renewable resource available to humanity. This seminar will examine each of the critical steps along the pathway towards the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in

Subjects

Engineering | Engineering | Microbial Systems | Microbial Systems | Biofuel Production | Biofuel Production | energy | energy | plant biomass | plant biomass | cellulose | cellulose | enzymes | enzymes | bacteria | bacteria | ethanol | ethanol | cellulolytic enzymes | cellulolytic enzymes | Cellulolytic Bacteria and Fungi | Cellulolytic Bacteria and Fungi | cellulases | cellulases | cellulosomes | cellulosomes | E. coli | E. coli | yeast | yeast

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.349 Stem Cells: A Cure or Disease? (MIT) 7.349 Stem Cells: A Cure or Disease? (MIT)

Description

Have you ever considered going to a pharmacy to order some new cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) for your ailing heart? It might sound crazy, but recent developments in stem cell science have made this concept not so futuristic. In this course, we will explore the underlying biology behind the idea of using stem cells to treat disease, specifically analyzing the mechanisms that enable a single genome to encode multiple cell states ranging from neurons to fibroblasts to T cells. Overall, we hope to provide a comprehensive overview of this exciting new field of research and its clinical relevance. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literat Have you ever considered going to a pharmacy to order some new cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) for your ailing heart? It might sound crazy, but recent developments in stem cell science have made this concept not so futuristic. In this course, we will explore the underlying biology behind the idea of using stem cells to treat disease, specifically analyzing the mechanisms that enable a single genome to encode multiple cell states ranging from neurons to fibroblasts to T cells. Overall, we hope to provide a comprehensive overview of this exciting new field of research and its clinical relevance. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literat

Subjects

stem cells | stem cells | stem cell therapy | stem cell therapy | cellular reprogramming | cellular reprogramming | transdifferentiation | transdifferentiation | pluripotency | pluripotency | epigenetics | epigenetics | genome-wide sequencing | genome-wide sequencing | transcription-mediated reprogramming | transcription-mediated reprogramming | embryonic stem cell technology | embryonic stem cell technology | transcription factors | transcription factors | chromatin structure | chromatin structure | H3K4me3 | H3K4me3 | H3K27me3 | H3K27me3 | histone deacetylase 1 | histone deacetylase 1 | RNAi screens | RNAi screens | Oct4 | Oct4 | cloning | cloning | Dolly | Dolly | in vitro differentiation | in vitro differentiation | regenerative medicine | regenerative medicine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.342 Systems and Synthetic Biology: How the Cell Solves Problems (MIT) 7.342 Systems and Synthetic Biology: How the Cell Solves Problems (MIT)

Description

A millennial challenge in biology is to decipher how vast arrays of molecular interactions inside the cell work in concert to produce a cellular function. Systems biology, a new interdisciplinary field of science, brings together biologists and physicists to tackle this grand challenge through quantitative experiments and models. In this course, we will discuss the unifying principles that all organisms use to perform cellular functions. We will also discuss key challenges faced by a cell in both single and multi-cellular organisms. Finally, we will discuss how researchers in the field of synthetic biology are using the new knowledge gained from studying naturally-occurring biological systems to create artificial gene networks capable of performing new functions. This course is one of many A millennial challenge in biology is to decipher how vast arrays of molecular interactions inside the cell work in concert to produce a cellular function. Systems biology, a new interdisciplinary field of science, brings together biologists and physicists to tackle this grand challenge through quantitative experiments and models. In this course, we will discuss the unifying principles that all organisms use to perform cellular functions. We will also discuss key challenges faced by a cell in both single and multi-cellular organisms. Finally, we will discuss how researchers in the field of synthetic biology are using the new knowledge gained from studying naturally-occurring biological systems to create artificial gene networks capable of performing new functions. This course is one of many

Subjects

systems biology | systems biology | synthetic biology | synthetic biology | cell | cell | cellular functions | cellular functions | biological systems | biological systems | artificial gene networks | artificial gene networks | molecular interactions | molecular interactions | molecular biology | molecular biology | genes | genes | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | macromolecules | macromolecules | intracellular biochemical interactions | intracellular biochemical interactions | extracellular molecules | extracellular molecules | gene expression | gene expression | stochastic gene expression | stochastic gene expression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata