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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering. This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Subjects

Interactions between proteins | Interactions between proteins | cells | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Biosensors | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Interactions between proteins | cells | Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | BE.340J | BE.340J | 3.051 | 3.051 | BE.340 | BE.340 | 20.340 | 20.340

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Tetragonal Zirconia Polycrystals (TZP)

Description

The comparatively low sintering temperature allows very fine grained (sub-micron), dense and so high strength as well as tough ceramics to be produced. The microstructure shows equiaxed, fine grains with little evidence of weakening grain boundary phases. Such microstructures have some of the highest values of toughness achieved in ceramics.

Subjects

ceramic | engineering ceramic | tough ceramic | toughness | zirconia | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Partially Stabilised Zirconia (PSZ)

Description

Ms) tetragonal precipitates in the cubic matrix. On interaction with a propagating crack, these transform to monoclinic symmetry expanding to close the crack so increasing toughness, so-called transformation toughening.

Subjects

ceramic | engineering ceramic | tough ceramic | toughness | zirconia | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Tetragonal Zirconia Polycrystals (TZP)

Description

The comparatively low sintering temperature allows very fine grained (sub-micron), dense and so high strength as well as tough ceramics to be produced. The microstructure shows equiaxed, fine grains with little evidence of weakening grain boundary phases. Such microstructures have some of the highest values of toughness achieved in ceramics.

Subjects

ceramic | engineering ceramic | tough ceramic | toughness | zirconia | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Partially Stabilised Zirconia (PSZ)

Description

The image shows cross sections through the oblate spheroid (like Smarties or M&Ms) tetragonal precipitates in the cubic matrix. On interaction with a propagating crack, these transform to monoclinic symmetry expanding to close the crack so increasing toughness, so-called transformation toughening.

Subjects

ceramic | engineering ceramic | tough ceramic | toughness | zirconia | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Commemorative plates Sunderland Museum & Winter Gardens

Description

Subjects

ceramic | plates | commemorative | sunderland | pottery | history | sunderlandmuseumwintergardens | potterycollection | commemorativeplates | colourphotograph | digitalimage | industry | social | abstract | interesting | unusual | fascinating | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | sunderlandpotterycommemorativeplates | georgeedmanbraveg | december30th1861 | born | birth | occasion | event | anniversary | illustration | letters | decoration | neutralbackground | shadow | artificiallight | display | detail | circular | curve | ceramicplatescollection | ceramicplatecollection | shapes | number | smallcaseletters | largecaseletters | leaves | branches | marks | grain | artanddesign | archives

License

No known copyright restrictions

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2.800 Tribology (MIT) 2.800 Tribology (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the design of tribological systems: the interfaces between two or more bodies in relative motion. Fundamental topics include: geometric, chemical, and physical characterization of surfaces; friction and wear mechanisms for metals, polymers, and ceramics, including abrasive wear, delamination theory, tool wear, erosive wear, wear of polymers and composites; and boundary lubrication and solid-film lubrication. The course also considers the relationship between nano-tribology and macro-tribology, rolling contacts, tribological problems in magnetic recording and electrical contacts, and monitoring and diagnosis of friction and wear. Case studies are used to illustrate key points. This course addresses the design of tribological systems: the interfaces between two or more bodies in relative motion. Fundamental topics include: geometric, chemical, and physical characterization of surfaces; friction and wear mechanisms for metals, polymers, and ceramics, including abrasive wear, delamination theory, tool wear, erosive wear, wear of polymers and composites; and boundary lubrication and solid-film lubrication. The course also considers the relationship between nano-tribology and macro-tribology, rolling contacts, tribological problems in magnetic recording and electrical contacts, and monitoring and diagnosis of friction and wear. Case studies are used to illustrate key points.

Subjects

tribology | tribology | surfaces | surfaces | interface | interface | friction | friction | wear | wear | metal | metal | polymer | polymer | ceramics | ceramics | abrasive wear | abrasive wear | delamination theory | delamination theory | tool wear | tool wear | erosive wear | erosive wear | composites | composites | boundary lubrication | boundary lubrication | solid-film lubrication. nano-tribology | solid-film lubrication. nano-tribology | macro-tribology | macro-tribology | rolling contacts | rolling contacts | magnetic recording | magnetic recording | electrical contact | electrical contact | connector | connector | axiomatic design | axiomatic design | traction | traction | seals | seals | solid-film lubrication | solid-film lubrication | nano-tribology | nano-tribology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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96% Alumina

Description

The image shows the classic angular shape of corundum (alumina) grains formed in a liquid medium. The intergranular regions are dark and contain the aluminosilicate glass left from the cooled liquid. This liquid will soften at high temperature and limit the maximum use temperature of the ceramic.

Subjects

alumina | ceramic | engineering ceramic | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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BaTiO3 Temperature-stable dielectric capacitor

Description

The image shows a single representative grain within the polycrystalline ceramic. The core region shows ferroelectric domains from the pure, tetragonal BaTiO3 centre. The shell region contains Nb and Bi dopant which make it cubic, paraelectric and also stacking faults associated with their presence. The heterogeneous nature of the microstructure confers the temperature stability on the ceramic.

Subjects

alumina | ceramic | engineering ceramic | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications. Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications.

Subjects

Phenomenology | Phenomenology | mechanical behavior | mechanical behavior | material structure | material structure | deformation | deformation | failure | failure | elasticity | elasticity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | creep | creep | fracture | fracture | fatigue | fatigue | metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | thin films | thin films | carbon nanotubes | carbon nanotubes | battery materials | battery materials | superelastic alloys | superelastic alloys | defect nucleation | defect nucleation | student projects | student projects | viral capsides | viral capsides

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others. This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials | magnetism | magnetism | polarity | polarity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | fracture | fracture | materials selection | materials selection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

Subjects

interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.11 Mechanics of Materials (MIT) 3.11 Mechanics of Materials (MIT)

Description

Overview of mechanical properties of ceramics, metals, and polymers, emphasizing the role of processing and microstructure in controlling these properties. Basic topics in mechanics of materials including: continuum stress and strain, truss forces, torsion of a circular shaft and beam bending. Design of engineering structures from a materials point of view. Overview of mechanical properties of ceramics, metals, and polymers, emphasizing the role of processing and microstructure in controlling these properties. Basic topics in mechanics of materials including: continuum stress and strain, truss forces, torsion of a circular shaft and beam bending. Design of engineering structures from a materials point of view.

Subjects

beam bending | beam bending | circular shaft bending | circular shaft bending | truss forces | truss forces | continuum stress and strain | continuum stress and strain | polymers | polymers | metals | metals | ceramics | ceramics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT) 3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT)

Description

Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components. Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components.

Subjects

Linear elastic | Linear elastic | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | Microstructural effects on fracture | Microstructural effects on fracture | Toughening mechanisms | Toughening mechanisms | Crack growth resistance | Crack growth resistance | creep fracture | creep fracture | Interface fracture mechanics | Interface fracture mechanics | Fatigue damage | Fatigue damage | dislocation substructures | dislocation substructures | Variable amplitude fatigue | Variable amplitude fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | experimental methods | experimental methods | microstructural effects | microstructural effects | metals | metals | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | thin films | thin films | biological materials | biological materials | composites | composites | single crystals | single crystals | stress-life | stress-life | strain-life | strain-life | structural components | structural components | bioimplant components | bioimplant components | microelectronic components | microelectronic components | case studies | case studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Zinc thiourea sulphate (ZTS) structure

Description

The micrograph shows zinc thiourea sulphate (ZTS) structure in dielectric ceramic

Subjects

ceramic | dielectric ceramic | ZTS | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Zinc thiourea sulphate (ZTS) structure

Description

The micrograph shows zinc thiourea sulphate (ZTS) structure in dielectric ceramic

Subjects

ceramic | dielectric ceramic | ZTS | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Barium Titanate Ag/Pd Multilayer Capacitor

Description

The light metal layers are shown edge on alternating with the ceramic layers. This sandwich configuration maximises the area of contact and so capacitance of the MLC. Thin ceramic layers are also desired to maximise capacitance. See the equation for a parallel plate capacitor.

Subjects

barium | barium titanate | ceramic | electroceramic | lead | multilayer capacitor | oxygen | silver | titanium | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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96% Alumina

Description

The image shows the classic angular shape of corundum (alumina) grains formed in a liquid medium. The intergranular regions are dark and contain the aluminosilicate glass left from the cooled liquid. This liquid will soften at high temperature and limit the maximum use temperature of the ceramic.

Subjects

alumina | ceramic | engineering ceramic | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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BaTiO3 Temperature-stable dielectric capacitor

Description

The image shows a single representative grain within the polycrystalline ceramic. The core region shows ferroelectric domains from the pure, tetragonal BaTiO3 centre. The shell region contains Nb and Bi dopant which make it cubic, paraelectric and also stacking faults associated with their presence. The heterogeneous nature of the microstructure confers the temperature stability on the ceramic.

Subjects

alumina | ceramic | engineering ceramic | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering

Description

In this subject, it is intended that students learn the basics of materials science, the classification of the various families of materials, their properties and applications, and the technology available for the improvement of their properties. In this subject, it is intended that students learn the basics of materials science, the classification of the various families of materials, their properties and applications, and the technology available for the improvement of their properties.

Subjects

materials science | materials science | ceramic materials | ceramic materials | mechanical properties | mechanical properties | families of materials | families of materials | phase diagrams | phase diagrams | materails science and engineering | materails science and engineering | a Mecnica | a Mecnica | functional properties | functional properties | a Metalrgica | a Metalrgica | composite materials | composite materials | structure of materials | structure of materials | a Elctrica | a Elctrica | metallic materials | metallic materials | 2010 | 2010 | polymeric materials | polymeric materials | bonding in solids | bonding in solids | a Electrnica Industrial y Automtica | a Electrnica Industrial y Automtica

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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3.082 Materials Processing Laboratory (MIT) 3.082 Materials Processing Laboratory (MIT)

Description

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using appropriate processing technologies (injection molding, thermoforming, investment casting, powder processing, brazing, etc.). Emphasis on teamwork, project management, communications and computer skills, and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Goals include developing an understanding of the practical applications of MSE; trade-offs between design, processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using appropriate processing technologies (injection molding, thermoforming, investment casting, powder processing, brazing, etc.). Emphasis on teamwork, project management, communications and computer skills, and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Goals include developing an understanding of the practical applications of MSE; trade-offs between design, processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

Subjects

investment casting of metals | investment casting of metals | injection molding of polymers | injection molding of polymers | sintering of ceramics | sintering of ceramics | operating processing equipment | operating processing equipment | materials engineering project management | materials engineering project management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Zinc thiourea sulphate (ZTS) structure

Description

The micrograph shows zinc thiourea sulphate (ZTS) structure in dielectric ceramic

Subjects

ceramic | dielectric ceramic | zts | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Zinc thiourea sulphate (ZTS) structure

Description

The micrograph shows zinc thiourea sulphate (ZTS) structure in dielectric ceramic

Subjects

ceramic | dielectric ceramic | zts | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course explores the phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level and the relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics covered include elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, creep, fracture, and fatigue. Case studies and examples are drawn from structural and functional applications that include a variety of material classes: metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, composites, and cellular materials. This course explores the phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level and the relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics covered include elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, creep, fracture, and fatigue. Case studies and examples are drawn from structural and functional applications that include a variety of material classes: metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, composites, and cellular materials.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials

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