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s Points of View

Description

Professor Jon Mee, University of Warwick, discusses how Dickens's fiction can be considered 'cinematic' by drawing attention to the shifting points of view in Oliver Twist, Our Mutual Friend, and other novels. He relates this to work done in recent and historical adaptations of Dickens's work. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | points of view | Our Mutual Friend | Victorian literature | cinematic | Oliver Twist | dickens | #greatwriters | points of view | Our Mutual Friend | Victorian literature | cinematic | Oliver Twist | dickens

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) 21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of media. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, performance, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. This year’s course will focus on issues of network culture and media convergence, addressing such subjects as Intellectual Property, peer2peer authoring, blogging, and game modification. Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of media. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, performance, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. This year’s course will focus on issues of network culture and media convergence, addressing such subjects as Intellectual Property, peer2peer authoring, blogging, and game modification.

Subjects

Comparative Media Studies | Comparative Media Studies | global multimedia environment | global multimedia environment | literate | literate | critical | critical | consumers | consumers | producers | producers | interdisciplinary | interdisciplinary | comparative | comparative | historical | historical | lens | lens | the course defines oral | the course defines oral | print | print | performance | performance | photographic | photographic | broadcast | broadcast | cinematic | cinematic | digital | digital | cultural | cultural | forms | forms | practices | practices | mediated communication | mediated communication | functions | functions | society | society | network culture | network culture | media convergence | media convergence | Intellectual Property | Intellectual Property | peer2peer authoring | peer2peer authoring | blogging | blogging | game modification | game modification | lens | the course defines oral | lens | the course defines oral

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) 21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of culture. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, theatrical, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. Over the course of the semester we explore different theoretical perspectives on the role and power of media in society in influencing our social values, political beliefs, identities Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of culture. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, theatrical, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. Over the course of the semester we explore different theoretical perspectives on the role and power of media in society in influencing our social values, political beliefs, identities

Subjects

literature | literature | comparative mass media | comparative mass media | communication | communication | modern culture | modern culture | social values | social values | politics | politics | radio | radio | television | television | film | film | print | print | digital techonology | digital techonology | history | history | storytelling | storytelling | advertising | advertising | oral | oral | culture | culture | photography | photography | oral culture | oral culture | cultural forms | cultural forms | political beliefs | political beliefs | economics | economics | mediated communication | mediated communication | class politics | class politics | gender | gender | race | race | identity | identity | behavior | behavior | criticism | criticism | global multimedia environment | global multimedia environment | consumers | consumers | theatrical | theatrical | photographic | photographic | broadcast | broadcast | cinematic | cinematic | cinema | cinema | theatre | theatre | printing | printing | publishing | publishing | books | books | electronic | electronic | transformations | transformations | narrative | narrative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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21F.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21F.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of media. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, performance, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. This year’s course will focus on issues of network culture and media convergence, addressing such subjects as Intellectual Property, peer2peer authoring, blogging, and game modification.

Subjects

Comparative Media Studies | global multimedia environment | literate | critical | consumers | producers | interdisciplinary | comparative | historical | lens | the course defines oral | print | performance | photographic | broadcast | cinematic | digital | cultural | forms | practices | mediated communication | functions | society | network culture | media convergence | Intellectual Property | peer2peer authoring | blogging | game modification | lens | the course defines oral

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of culture. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, theatrical, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. Over the course of the semester we explore different theoretical perspectives on the role and power of media in society in influencing our social values, political beliefs, identities

Subjects

literature | comparative mass media | communication | modern culture | social values | politics | radio | television | film | print | digital techonology | history | storytelling | advertising | oral | culture | photography | oral culture | cultural forms | political beliefs | economics | mediated communication | class politics | gender | race | identity | behavior | criticism | global multimedia environment | consumers | theatrical | photographic | broadcast | cinematic | cinema | theatre | printing | publishing | books | electronic | transformations | narrative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Searchlights in the sky

Description

This is a glass slide creating an almost cinematic scene of a grand building and fountain illuminated by dramatic searchlights in the sky. The slide has no stated date, but is believed to have been taken by South Shields Photographic Society's photographer Harrison Burgess. This image is part of the Tyne & Wear archives & museums set Harrison Burgess and the South Shields Photographic Society. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email adam.bell@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

blackandwhite | glassslide | cinematicscene | grandbuilding | fountain | illumination | decoration | designs | lights | patterns | display | dazzled | shadow | nightsky | stars | star | southshieldsphotographicsociety | photographer | searchlights | harrisonburgess | bench | stillwater | potplant | box | lawn | pillar | reflection | universe | majestic | glare

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums | FlickR

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21F.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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