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11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT) 11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian | utopian and realized form | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | future prospects of cities | territory | territory | cities | cities | context | context | local | local | national | national | global | global | urban settings | urban settings | city design | city design | social justice | social justice | politics of change | politics of change | urban design | urban design | history | history | theory | theory | territorial settings | territorial settings | urbanites | urbanites | city dwellers | city dwellers | inhabitants | inhabitants | nestedness | nestedness | regional | regional | imperial | imperial | politics | politics | sociology | sociology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT) 4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

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4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT) 4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT)

Description

In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | architecture | architecture | visual artists | visual artists | production models | production models | design process | design process

License

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11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT) 11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT)

Description

During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building

Subjects

centrally planned economies | centrally planned economies | market-oriented economies | market-oriented economies | transition economies | transition economies | the proper relationship between business | the proper relationship between business | government | government | and the public interest | and the public interest | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | how economic transition has reshaped cities | how economic transition has reshaped cities | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | CIS | CIS | Asia | Asia | business | business | public interest | public interest | economic growth | economic growth | equity | equity | cities | cities | institution-building | institution-building | institutions | institutions | liberalization | liberalization | privatization | privatization | entrepreneurs | entrepreneurs | private firms | private firms | law | law | property rights | property rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | why cities become torn | ethnic | ethnic | religious | religious | racial | racial | nationalist | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | violence | inequality | inequality | social injustice | social injustice | solutions | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | regional or transnational | policymaking | policymaking | democratic participation | democratic participation | citizenship | citizenship | spatial | spatial | infrastructural | infrastructural | technological interventions | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democracy | democratic | democratic | territory | territory | territorial | territorial | participation | participation | policy | policy | theoretical | theoretical | practical | practical | identity | identity | conflict | conflict | social | social | political | political | theories | theories | regional | regional | transnational | transnational | levels of determination | levels of determination | institutional | institutional | technological | technological | interventions | interventions | city | city | difference | difference | diversity | diversity | equality | equality | class | class | cities | cities | nations | nations | legal | legal | jurisdiction | jurisdiction | peace | peace | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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[Landscape with Domestic Buildings] [Landscape with Domestic Buildings]

Description

Subjects

cities | cities | towns | towns | citiesandtowns | citiesandtowns

License

No known copyright restrictions

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[Landscape with Houses] [Landscape with Houses]

Description

Subjects

cities | cities | town | town | citiesandtowns | citiesandtowns

License

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[Shoreline with Many Buildings] [Shoreline with Many Buildings]

Description

Subjects

buildings | buildings | waterfronts | waterfronts | citiesandtowns | citiesandtowns | cities | cities | towns | towns

License

No known copyright restrictions

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[Landscape with Many Buildings] [Landscape with Many Buildings]

Description

Subjects

citiesandtowns | citiesandtowns | cities | cities | towns | towns

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Bedrashen, Egypt. Bedrashen, Egypt.

Description

Subjects

stereoviews | stereoviews | donkeys | donkeys | cities | cities | towns | towns | citiesandtowns | citiesandtowns

License

No known copyright restrictions

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11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | territory | cities | context | local | national | global | urban settings | city design | social justice | politics of change | urban design | history | theory | territorial settings | urbanites | city dwellers | inhabitants | nestedness | regional | imperial | politics | sociology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sustainable development and crime in the urban Caribbean

Description

David Howard (Lecturer in Sustainable Urban Development, University of Oxford) looks at larger concerns over social and spatial equity, conceptual approaches to sovereignty and the practical interpretation of sustainable forms of justice. Abstract: Recent urban policy initiatives in the Caribbean have shifted from producing material infrastructural change to a greater emphasis on confronting 'civil disorder' via new forms of policing and surveillance. Just as development policy witnessed a 'cultural turn' during the 1990s, so too have sustainable development initiatives at local and international scales recognised and revised attention on forms of social sustainability. Increasing levels of violent crime over the last decade across the Caribbean, one of the most urbanised regions in th Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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New business models for low-carbon cities

Description

Mark Hinnells (Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford) explores the impact of policy measures to deliver a low-carbon economy on the development of new business models for low-carbon cities. Abstract: This research explores the impact of policy measures to deliver a low carbon economy (both near term and more extensive policy change) on the development of new business models for low carbon cities. Buildings account for around 47% of UK Carbon emissions (including both residential and non-residential buildings, and including space conditioning, lights and appliances and equipment). The current policy framework will not be sufficient to deliver a 60% or 80% reduction in carbon emissions, and the policy framework is expected to see substantial change in the next decade and be Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

low-carbon economy | urban policy and planning | sustainability | future | cities | new business models | low-carbon economy | urban policy and planning | sustainability | future | cities | new business models | 2010-10-18

License

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Resilience and adaptation in complex city systems

Description

James Simmie (Department of Planning, Oxford Brookes University) develops an evolutionary economics approach to adaptation and change in urban economies. Abstract: In this lecture, James Simmie develops one of the evolutionary economics approaches to understanding adaptation and change in the economic trajectories of urban economies. Neo-classical equilibrist versions of resilience and adaptation are rejected in favour of an evolutionary perspective. He argues in particular for an explanation based on why and how local economies adapt through time both to continual mutations and to periodic gales of creative destruction. Simmie focuses on the extent to which the "panarchy" conceptual framework can suggest testable hypotheses concerning urban and regional resilience. He explores some of

Subjects

Future | cities | urban policy and planning | resilience | adaptation | flexibility | economics | 2010-10-18 | ukoer | Future | cities | urban policy and planning | resilience | adaptation | flexibility | economics | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Sustainable development and crime in the urban Caribbean

Description

David Howard (Lecturer in Sustainable Urban Development, University of Oxford) looks at larger concerns over social and spatial equity, conceptual approaches to sovereignty and the practical interpretation of sustainable forms of justice. Abstract: Recent urban policy initiatives in the Caribbean have shifted from producing material infrastructural change to a greater emphasis on confronting 'civil disorder' via new forms of policing and surveillance. Just as development policy witnessed a 'cultural turn' during the 1990s, so too have sustainable development initiatives at local and international scales recognised and revised attention on forms of social sustainability. Increasing levels of violent crime over the last decade across the Caribbean, one of the most urbanised regions in th Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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New business models for low-carbon cities

Description

Mark Hinnells (Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford) explores the impact of policy measures to deliver a low-carbon economy on the development of new business models for low-carbon cities Abstract: This research explores the impact of policy measures to deliver a low carbon economy (both near term and more extensive policy change) on the development of new business models for low carbon cities. Buildings account for around 47% of UK Carbon emissions (including both residential and non-residential buildings, and including space conditioning, lights and appliances and equipment). The current policy framework will not be sufficient to deliver a 60% or 80% reduction in carbon emissions, and the policy framework is expected to see substantial change in the next decade and bey

Subjects

Future | cities | sustainability | urban policy and planning | low-carbon economy | new business models | ukoer | Future | cities | sustainability | urban policy and planning | low-carbon economy | new business models

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.166 Law, Social Movements, and Public Policy: Comparative and International Experience (MIT) 11.166 Law, Social Movements, and Public Policy: Comparative and International Experience (MIT)

Description

The course introduces theoretical frameworks from legal and social movement theories as applied to court opinions, legislation, treaties, law-related articles, and policy-oriented materials and focuses on the impact of the relationship between courts and grassroots activism on current issues like trade, environmental regulation, and human rights enforcement. Students examine case studies of institutional processes including the World Trade Organization and the World Bank from key countries like the US and India. The course introduces theoretical frameworks from legal and social movement theories as applied to court opinions, legislation, treaties, law-related articles, and policy-oriented materials and focuses on the impact of the relationship between courts and grassroots activism on current issues like trade, environmental regulation, and human rights enforcement. Students examine case studies of institutional processes including the World Trade Organization and the World Bank from key countries like the US and India.

Subjects

cities | cities | developers | developers | real estate | real estate | technology | technology | digital | digital | design | design | urban renewal | urban renewal | value creation | value creation | livability | livability | social capital | social capital | rejuvenation | rejuvenation | brokerage | brokerage | urban planning | urban planning | physical fabric | physical fabric | partnerships | partnerships

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT) 21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through discussions centered on India's history, politics and religion. The focus is on issues such as ethnic tension and terrorism, poverty and inequality, caste conflict, the "missing women," and the effects of globalization on popular and folk cultures. Particular emphasis is on the IT revolution, outsourcing, the "new global India," and the enormous regional and sub-cultural differences. This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through discussions centered on India's history, politics and religion. The focus is on issues such as ethnic tension and terrorism, poverty and inequality, caste conflict, the "missing women," and the effects of globalization on popular and folk cultures. Particular emphasis is on the IT revolution, outsourcing, the "new global India," and the enormous regional and sub-cultural differences.

Subjects

Bipan Chandra | Bipan Chandra | Ismat Chugtai | Ismat Chugtai | Mahasweta Devi | Mahasweta Devi | Nayantara Sahgal | Nayantara Sahgal | Amartya Sen | Amartya Sen | directors | directors | film | film | writers | writers | leading parallel film makers | leading parallel film makers | Shyam Benegal | Shyam Benegal | Shekhar Kapoor | Shekhar Kapoor | Govind Nihalani | Govind Nihalani | Satyajit Ray | Satyajit Ray | IT revolution | IT revolution | documentaries | documentaries | Indian culture | Indian culture | globalization | globalization | Indian cities | Indian cities | political events | political events | social events | social events | negotiating the "system" in India | negotiating the "system" in India | ideology of a "new Indian" | ideology of a "new Indian"

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.014J American Urban History II (MIT) 11.014J American Urban History II (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students experience in working with primary documentation sources through its selection of readings and class discussions. Students then have the opportunity to apply this experience by researching their own historical questions and writing a term paper. This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students experience in working with primary documentation sources through its selection of readings and class discussions. Students then have the opportunity to apply this experience by researching their own historical questions and writing a term paper.

Subjects

urban planning | urban planning | urban design | urban design | cities | cities | downtown | downtown | skyscrapers | skyscrapers | buildings | buildings | open space | open space | infrastructure | infrastructure | traffic | traffic | congestion | congestion | white flight | white flight | suburban development | suburban development | urban renewal | urban renewal | urban blight | urban blight | retail and business centers and districts | retail and business centers and districts | zoos | zoos | entertainment | entertainment | 11.014 | 11.014 | 21H.232 | 21H.232

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.013J American Urban History I (MIT) 11.013J American Urban History I (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions. This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions.

Subjects

urban planning | urban planning | urban design | urban design | cities | cities | downtown | downtown | skyscrapers | skyscrapers | buildings | buildings | institutions | institutions | police | police | prisons | prisons | courts | courts | city hall | city hall | political machines | political machines | reform | reform | crime | crime | public safety | public safety | public schools | public schools | education | education | welfare | welfare | railways | railways | public authorities | public authorities | housing | housing | slums | slums | hospitals | hospitals | universities | universities | 11.013 | 11.013 | 21H.231 | 21H.231

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT) 21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment. This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

riot | riot | strike | strike | conspiracy | conspiracy | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | U.S. history | U.S. history | revolutionary war | revolutionary war | boston tea party | boston tea party | civil war | civil war | slavery | slavery | slave uprisings | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | textile workers | textile workers | Lawrence | Lawrence | MA | MA | student uprising | student uprising | Vietnam War | Vietnam War | Columbia University | Columbia University | communism | communism | socialism | socialism | Lawrence | MA | Lawrence | MA | 21h.104 | 21h.104 | 11.015 | 11.015

License

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2.853 Manufacturing Systems I: Analytical Methods and Flow Models (MIT) 2.853 Manufacturing Systems I: Analytical Methods and Flow Models (MIT)

Description

Provides ways to conceptualize and analyze manufacturing systems and supply chains in terms of material flow, information flow, capacities, and flow times. Fundamental building blocks: inventory and queuing models, forecasting and uncertainty, optimization, process analysis, linear systems and system dynamics. Factory planning: flow planning, bottleneck characterization, buffer and batch-size tactics, seasonal planning, dynamics and learning for various process flow topologies and for various market contexts.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free  Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark Provides ways to conceptualize and analyze manufacturing systems and supply chains in terms of material flow, information flow, capacities, and flow times. Fundamental building blocks: inventory and queuing models, forecasting and uncertainty, optimization, process analysis, linear systems and system dynamics. Factory planning: flow planning, bottleneck characterization, buffer and batch-size tactics, seasonal planning, dynamics and learning for various process flow topologies and for various market contexts.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free  Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark

Subjects

manufacturing systems | manufacturing systems | supply chains | supply chains | material flow | material flow | information flow | information flow | capacities | capacities | flow times | flow times | Fundamental building blocks | Fundamental building blocks | inventory | inventory | queuing models | queuing models | forecasting | forecasting | uncertainty | uncertainty | optimization | optimization | process analysis | process analysis | linear systems | linear systems | system dynamics | system dynamics | Factory planning | Factory planning | flow planning | flow planning | bottleneck characterization | bottleneck characterization | buffer | buffer | batch-size tactics | batch-size tactics | seasonal planning | seasonal planning | process flow topologies | process flow topologies | market contexts | market contexts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.301J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT) 11.301J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This course examines both the structure of cities and ways they can be changed. Its scope includes historical forces that have produced cities, models of urban analysis, contemporary theories of urban design, implementation strategies. Core lectures are supplemented by discussion sessions focusing on student work and field trips. Guest speakers present cases involving current projects illustrating the scope and methods of urban design practice. This course examines both the structure of cities and ways they can be changed. Its scope includes historical forces that have produced cities, models of urban analysis, contemporary theories of urban design, implementation strategies. Core lectures are supplemented by discussion sessions focusing on student work and field trips. Guest speakers present cases involving current projects illustrating the scope and methods of urban design practice.

Subjects

cities | cities | Boston | Boston | American city | American city | market | market | social forces | social forces | public development | public development | regulation of private development | regulation of private development | incentives to encourage good design | incentives to encourage good design | plans | plans | proposals | proposals | case studies | case studies | field trips | field trips | Traditional City | Traditional City | the City as a Work of Art | the City as a Work of Art | the Efficient City | the Efficient City | the Garden City | the Garden City | the Secure City | the Secure City | the Information City | the Information City | Virtual City | Virtual City | 11.301 | 11.301 | 4.252 | 4.252

License

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13.00 Introduction to Ocean Science and Technology (MIT) 13.00 Introduction to Ocean Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

Introductory subject for students majoring or minoring in ocean engineering and others desiring introductory knowledge in the field. Physical oceanography including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density, heat balance, major ocean circulations and geostrophic flows, and influence of wind stress. Surface waves including wave velocities, propagation phenomena, and descriptions of real sea waves. Acoustics in the ocean including influence of water properties on sound speed and refraction, sounds generated by ships and marine animals, fundamentals of sonar, types of sonar systems and their principles of operation.Technical RequirementsAny number of software tools can be used to import the .dat files found on this course site. Please refer to the course materials for any specific i Introductory subject for students majoring or minoring in ocean engineering and others desiring introductory knowledge in the field. Physical oceanography including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density, heat balance, major ocean circulations and geostrophic flows, and influence of wind stress. Surface waves including wave velocities, propagation phenomena, and descriptions of real sea waves. Acoustics in the ocean including influence of water properties on sound speed and refraction, sounds generated by ships and marine animals, fundamentals of sonar, types of sonar systems and their principles of operation.Technical RequirementsAny number of software tools can be used to import the .dat files found on this course site. Please refer to the course materials for any specific i

Subjects

Physical oceanography | | Physical oceanography | | major ocean circulations | | major ocean circulations | | geostrophic flows | | geostrophic flows | | Surface waves | | Surface waves | | wave velocities | | wave velocities | | propagation phenomena | | propagation phenomena | | ocean acoustics | | ocean acoustics | | sonar | sonar

License

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2.011 Introduction to Ocean Science and Technology (13.00) (MIT) 2.011 Introduction to Ocean Science and Technology (13.00) (MIT)

Description

Introductory subject for students majoring or minoring in ocean engineering and others desiring introductory knowledge in the field. Physical oceanography including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density, heat balance, major ocean circulations and geostrophic flows, and influence of wind stress. Surface waves including wave velocities, propagation phenomena, and descriptions of real sea waves. Acoustics in the ocean including influence of water properties on sound speed and refraction, sounds generated by ships and marine animals, fundamentals of sonar, types of sonar systems and their principles of operation.This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.00. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mec Introductory subject for students majoring or minoring in ocean engineering and others desiring introductory knowledge in the field. Physical oceanography including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density, heat balance, major ocean circulations and geostrophic flows, and influence of wind stress. Surface waves including wave velocities, propagation phenomena, and descriptions of real sea waves. Acoustics in the ocean including influence of water properties on sound speed and refraction, sounds generated by ships and marine animals, fundamentals of sonar, types of sonar systems and their principles of operation.This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.00. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mec

Subjects

Physical oceanography | | Physical oceanography | | major ocean circulations | | major ocean circulations | | geostrophic flows | | geostrophic flows | | Surface waves | | Surface waves | | wave velocities | | wave velocities | | propagation phenomena | | propagation phenomena | | ocean acoustics | | ocean acoustics | | sonar | sonar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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