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6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT) 6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm. More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm. More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and

Subjects

coding techniques | coding techniques | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | performance analysis | performance analysis | Small signal constellations | Small signal constellations | coding gain | coding gain | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Reed-Muller codes | Reed-Muller codes | finite fields | finite fields | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | binary linear convolutional codes | binary linear convolutional codes | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | trellis-based ML decoding | trellis-based ML decoding | Codes on graphs | Codes on graphs | sum-product | sum-product | max-product | max-product | decoding algorithms | decoding algorithms | Turbo codes | Turbo codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Lattice codes. | Lattice codes. | Trellis-coded modulation | Trellis-coded modulation | Multilevel coding | Multilevel coding | Shaping | Shaping | Lattice codes | Lattice codes

License

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6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT) 6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm.More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and min-sum algorithms This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm.More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and min-sum algorithms

Subjects

coding techniques | coding techniques | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | performance analysis | performance analysis | Small signal constellations | Small signal constellations | coding gain | coding gain | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Reed-Muller codes | Reed-Muller codes | finite fields | finite fields | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | binary linear convolutional codes | binary linear convolutional codes | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | trellis-based ML decoding | trellis-based ML decoding | Codes on graphs | Codes on graphs | sum-product | sum-product | max-product | max-product | decoding algorithms | decoding algorithms | Turbo codes | Turbo codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Lattice codes | Lattice codes | Trellis-coded modulation | Trellis-coded modulation | Multilevel coding | Multilevel coding | Shaping | Shaping

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm. More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and min-sum algorithms; the BCJR algorithm; tur

Subjects

coding techniques | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | performance analysis | Small signal constellations | coding gain | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Reed-Muller codes | finite fields | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | binary linear convolutional codes | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | trellis-based ML decoding | Codes on graphs | sum-product | max-product | decoding algorithms | Turbo codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Lattice codes. | Trellis-coded modulation | Multilevel coding | Shaping | Lattice codes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm.More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and min-sum algorithms

Subjects

coding techniques | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | performance analysis | Small signal constellations | coding gain | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Reed-Muller codes | finite fields | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | binary linear convolutional codes | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | trellis-based ML decoding | Codes on graphs | sum-product | max-product | decoding algorithms | Turbo codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Lattice codes | Trellis-coded modulation | Multilevel coding | Shaping

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.310 Principles of Discrete Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.310 Principles of Discrete Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to discrete applied mathematics. Topics include probability, counting, linear programming, number-theoretic algorithms, sorting, data compression, and error-correcting codes. This is a Communication Intensive in the Major (CI-M) course, and thus includes a writing component. This course is an introduction to discrete applied mathematics. Topics include probability, counting, linear programming, number-theoretic algorithms, sorting, data compression, and error-correcting codes. This is a Communication Intensive in the Major (CI-M) course, and thus includes a writing component.

Subjects

probability | probability | probability theory counting | probability theory counting | pigeonhole principle | pigeonhole principle | Van der Waerden's theorem | Van der Waerden's theorem | Chernoff bounds | Chernoff bounds | counting | counting | coding | coding | sampling | sampling | random sampling | random sampling | Catalan families | Catalan families | generating functions | generating functions | chord diagrams | chord diagrams | linear programming | linear programming | simplex method | simplex method | Zero-Sum matrix | Zero-Sum matrix | network flows | network flows | maximum flow problem | maximum flow problem | sorting algorithms | sorting algorithms | QUICKSORT | QUICKSORT | median finding | median finding | sorting networks | sorting networks | Batcher's algorithm | Batcher's algorithm | Euclid's algorithm | Euclid's algorithm | Chinese Remainder Theorem | Chinese Remainder Theorem | cryptography | cryptography | RSA code | RSA code | primaility testing | primaility testing | FFT | FFT | Fast Fourier Transform | Fast Fourier Transform | Shannon's coding theorems | Shannon's coding theorems | Lempel-Ziv codes | Lempel-Ziv codes | linear codes | linear codes | hamming code | hamming code

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.413 Error-Correcting Codes Laboratory (MIT) 18.413 Error-Correcting Codes Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to iterative decoding algorithms and the codes to which they are applied, including Turbo Codes, Low-Density Parity-Check Codes, and Serially-Concatenated Codes. The course will begin with an introduction to the fundamental problems of Coding Theory and their mathematical formulations. This will be followed by a study of Belief Propagation--the probabilistic heuristic which underlies iterative decoding algorithms. Belief Propagation will then be applied to the decoding of Turbo, LDPC, and Serially-Concatenated codes. The technical portion of the course will conclude with a study of tools for explaining and predicting the behavior of iterative decoding algorithms, including EXIT charts and Density Evolution. This course introduces students to iterative decoding algorithms and the codes to which they are applied, including Turbo Codes, Low-Density Parity-Check Codes, and Serially-Concatenated Codes. The course will begin with an introduction to the fundamental problems of Coding Theory and their mathematical formulations. This will be followed by a study of Belief Propagation--the probabilistic heuristic which underlies iterative decoding algorithms. Belief Propagation will then be applied to the decoding of Turbo, LDPC, and Serially-Concatenated codes. The technical portion of the course will conclude with a study of tools for explaining and predicting the behavior of iterative decoding algorithms, including EXIT charts and Density Evolution.

Subjects

iterative decoding | iterative decoding | error-correcting codes | error-correcting codes | Turbo Codes | Turbo Codes | Low-Density Parity-Check Codes | Low-Density Parity-Check Codes | serially concatenated codes | serially concatenated codes | aid code design | aid code design | iterative decoding algorithms | iterative decoding algorithms | Belief Propagation Serially-Concatenated codes | Belief Propagation Serially-Concatenated codes | EXIT charts | EXIT charts | Density Evolution | Density Evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.973 Communication System Design (MIT) 6.973 Communication System Design (MIT)

Description

This course presents a top-down approach to communications system design. The course will cover communication theory, algorithms and implementation architectures for essential blocks in modern physical-layer communication systems (coders and decoders, filters, multi-tone modulation, synchronization sub-systems). The course is hands-on, with a project component serving as a vehicle for study of different communication techniques, architectures and implementations. This year, the project is focused on WLAN transceivers. At the end of the course, students will have gone through the complete WLAN System-On-a-Chip design process, from communication theory, through algorithm and architecture all the way to the synthesized standard-cell RTL chip representation. This course presents a top-down approach to communications system design. The course will cover communication theory, algorithms and implementation architectures for essential blocks in modern physical-layer communication systems (coders and decoders, filters, multi-tone modulation, synchronization sub-systems). The course is hands-on, with a project component serving as a vehicle for study of different communication techniques, architectures and implementations. This year, the project is focused on WLAN transceivers. At the end of the course, students will have gone through the complete WLAN System-On-a-Chip design process, from communication theory, through algorithm and architecture all the way to the synthesized standard-cell RTL chip representation.

Subjects

communication | communication | coders and decoders | filters | multi-tone modulation | synchronization sub-systems | coders and decoders | filters | multi-tone modulation | synchronization sub-systems | coders | coders | decoders | decoders | filters | filters | multi-tone modulation | multi-tone modulation | synchronization sub-systems | synchronization sub-systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.370 The Battlecode Programming Competition (MIT) 6.370 The Battlecode Programming Competition (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is conducted as an artificial intelligence programming contest in Java. Students work in teams to program virtual robots to play Battlecode, a real-time strategy game. Optional lectures are provided on topics and programming practices relevant to the game, and students learn and improve their programming skills experientially. The competition culminates in a live Battlecode tournament. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is conducted as an artificial intelligence programming contest in Java. Students work in teams to program virtual robots to play Battlecode, a real-time strategy game. Optional lectures are provided on topics and programming practices relevant to the game, and students learn and improve their programming skills experientially. The competition culminates in a live Battlecode tournament. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

Battlecode | Battlecode | programming | programming | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | distributed algorithm | distributed algorithm | network communication | network communication | robot | robot | team | team | code | code | build | build | strategy | strategy | player | player | game | game | pathing | pathing | search | search | navigation | navigation | computation | computation | data | data | structure | structure | debugging | debugging | bytecode | bytecode | method | method | cost | cost | Git | Git | repository | repository | swarm | swarm | spawn time | spawn time | heuristics | heuristics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Protocol and project modules Protocol and project modules

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. This resource presents a number of postgraduate courses that are offered by the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health: Applied Epidemiology Public Health Public Health (International Health) It covers the work Masters students need to undertake in the modules that, first, cover the development of a protocol and project (A34574) and, secondly, the assessment of the dissertation (A34575). For Diploma students following the Diploma in Public Health or Diploma in Applied Epidemiology the information covers the development of a protocol and a literature review or short epidemiological study (A34562 or A34580 respectively). Module Code: A34574 (Protocol for Masters stu This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. This resource presents a number of postgraduate courses that are offered by the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health: Applied Epidemiology Public Health Public Health (International Health) It covers the work Masters students need to undertake in the modules that, first, cover the development of a protocol and project (A34574) and, secondly, the assessment of the dissertation (A34575). For Diploma students following the Diploma in Public Health or Diploma in Applied Epidemiology the information covers the development of a protocol and a literature review or short epidemiological study (A34562 or A34580 respectively). Module Code: A34574 (Protocol for Masters stu

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Applied Epidemiology | Applied Epidemiology | Public Health | Public Health | International Health | International Health | module code: A34574 | module code: A34574 | module code: A34575 | module code: A34575 | module code: A34562 | module code: A34562 | A34580 | A34580 | protocol | protocol | Division of Epidemiology and Public Health | Division of Epidemiology and Public Health

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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18.310 Principles of Discrete Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to discrete applied mathematics. Topics include probability, counting, linear programming, number-theoretic algorithms, sorting, data compression, and error-correcting codes. This is a Communication Intensive in the Major (CI-M) course, and thus includes a writing component.

Subjects

probability | probability theory counting | pigeonhole principle | Van der Waerden's theorem | Chernoff bounds | counting | coding | sampling | random sampling | Catalan families | generating functions | chord diagrams | linear programming | simplex method | Zero-Sum matrix | network flows | maximum flow problem | sorting algorithms | QUICKSORT | median finding | sorting networks | Batcher's algorithm | Euclid's algorithm | Chinese Remainder Theorem | cryptography | RSA code | primaility testing | FFT | Fast Fourier Transform | Shannon's coding theorems | Lempel-Ziv codes | linear codes | hamming code

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | discrete | discrete | math | math | mathematics | mathematics | seminar | seminar | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral | oral | communication | communication | stable marriage | stable marriage | dych | dych | emergency | emergency | response vehicles | response vehicles | ambulance | ambulance | game theory | game theory | congruences | congruences | color theorem | color theorem | four color | four color | cake cutting | cake cutting | algorithm | algorithm | RSA | RSA | encryption | encryption | numberical integration | numberical integration | sorting | sorting | post correspondence problem | post correspondence problem | PCP | PCP | ramsey | ramsey | van der waals | van der waals | fibonacci | fibonacci | recursion | recursion | domino | domino | tiling | tiling | towers | towers | hanoi | hanoi | pigeonhole | pigeonhole | principle | principle | matrix | matrix | hamming | hamming | code | code | hat game | hat game | juggling | juggling | zero-knowledge | zero-knowledge | proof | proof | repeated games | repeated games | lewis carroll | lewis carroll | determinants | determinants | infinitude of primes | infinitude of primes | bridges | bridges | konigsberg | konigsberg | koenigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | time series analysis | GARCH | GARCH | rational | rational | recurrence | recurrence | relations | relations | digital | digital | image | image | compression | compression | quantum computing | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Índia Índia

Description

Subjects

fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | gulbenkian | gulbenkian | bibliotecadearte | bibliotecadearte | biblioteca | biblioteca | arte | arte | francismilletrogers | francismilletrogers | francis | francis | millet | millet | rogers | rogers | velhagoa | velhagoa | índia | índia | fonte | fonte | basílicadobomjesus | basílicadobomjesus | basílica | basílica | bomjesus | bomjesus | mosteirodesãofranciscodeassis | mosteirodesãofranciscodeassis | mosteiro | mosteiro | sãofranciscodeassis | sãofranciscodeassis | arquitectura | arquitectura

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Índia Índia

Description

Subjects

fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | gulbenkian | gulbenkian | bibliotecadearte | bibliotecadearte | biblioteca | biblioteca | arte | arte | francismilletrogers | francismilletrogers | francis | francis | millet | millet | rogers | rogers | velhagoa | velhagoa | índia | índia | goa | goa | estátua | estátua | camões | camões | mosteirodesãofranciscodeassis | mosteirodesãofranciscodeassis | mosteiro | mosteiro | sãofranciscodeassis | sãofranciscodeassis | assis | assis | arquitectura | arquitectura

License

No known copyright restrictions

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18.413 Error-Correcting Codes Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to iterative decoding algorithms and the codes to which they are applied, including Turbo Codes, Low-Density Parity-Check Codes, and Serially-Concatenated Codes. The course will begin with an introduction to the fundamental problems of Coding Theory and their mathematical formulations. This will be followed by a study of Belief Propagation--the probabilistic heuristic which underlies iterative decoding algorithms. Belief Propagation will then be applied to the decoding of Turbo, LDPC, and Serially-Concatenated codes. The technical portion of the course will conclude with a study of tools for explaining and predicting the behavior of iterative decoding algorithms, including EXIT charts and Density Evolution.

Subjects

iterative decoding | error-correcting codes | Turbo Codes | Low-Density Parity-Check Codes | serially concatenated codes | aid code design | iterative decoding algorithms | Belief Propagation Serially-Concatenated codes | EXIT charts | Density Evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.973 Communication System Design (MIT)

Description

This course presents a top-down approach to communications system design. The course will cover communication theory, algorithms and implementation architectures for essential blocks in modern physical-layer communication systems (coders and decoders, filters, multi-tone modulation, synchronization sub-systems). The course is hands-on, with a project component serving as a vehicle for study of different communication techniques, architectures and implementations. This year, the project is focused on WLAN transceivers. At the end of the course, students will have gone through the complete WLAN System-On-a-Chip design process, from communication theory, through algorithm and architecture all the way to the synthesized standard-cell RTL chip representation.

Subjects

communication | coders and decoders | filters | multi-tone modulation | synchronization sub-systems | coders | decoders | filters | multi-tone modulation | synchronization sub-systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Political ideas in revolution Political ideas in revolution

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the ideas of key thinkers in the history of western political thought. We look carefully at the canonical works of five thinkers in the history of political thought: Plato, Aristotle, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. The module considers the impact of these thinkers on ancient and modern political thought and practices, with reference to the different contexts in which they wrote. We consider the way in which these thinkers have approached the ‘big’ questions and ideas that lie behind everyday political life. The module examines questions such as: What is justice? What is the purpose of government? What is the This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the ideas of key thinkers in the history of western political thought. We look carefully at the canonical works of five thinkers in the history of political thought: Plato, Aristotle, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. The module considers the impact of these thinkers on ancient and modern political thought and practices, with reference to the different contexts in which they wrote. We consider the way in which these thinkers have approached the ‘big’ questions and ideas that lie behind everyday political life. The module examines questions such as: What is justice? What is the purpose of government? What is the

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | module code M11001 | module code M11001 | history of western political thought | history of western political thought | module code M11151 | module code M11151 | Plato | Plato | Aristotle | Aristotle | Niccolo Machiavelli | Niccolo Machiavelli | Thomas Hobbes | Thomas Hobbes | John Locke | John Locke | ancient and modern political thought and practices | ancient and modern political thought and practices

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | discrete | discrete | math | math | mathematics | mathematics | seminar | seminar | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral | oral | communication | communication | stable marriage | stable marriage | dych | dych | emergency | emergency | response vehicles | response vehicles | ambulance | ambulance | game theory | game theory | congruences | congruences | color theorem | color theorem | four color | four color | cake cutting | cake cutting | algorithm | algorithm | RSA | RSA | encryption | encryption | numberical integration | numberical integration | sorting | sorting | post correspondence problem | post correspondence problem | PCP | PCP | ramsey | ramsey | van der waals | van der waals | fibonacci | fibonacci | recursion | recursion | domino | domino | tiling | tiling | towers | towers | hanoi | hanoi | pigeonhole | pigeonhole | principle | principle | matrix | matrix | hamming | hamming | code | code | hat game | hat game | juggling | juggling | zero-knowledge | zero-knowledge | proof | proof | repeated games | repeated games | lewis carroll | lewis carroll | determinants | determinants | infinitude of primes | infinitude of primes | bridges | bridges | konigsberg | konigsberg | koenigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | time series analysis | GARCH | GARCH | rational | rational | recurrence | recurrence | relations | relations | digital | digital | image | image | compression | compression | quantum computing | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.S096 Effective Programming in C and C++ (MIT) 6.S096 Effective Programming in C and C++ (MIT)

Description

This course is a fast-paced introduction to the C and C++ programming languages, with an emphasis on good programming practices and how to be an effective programmer in these languages. Topics include object-oriented programming, memory management, advantages of C and C++, optimization, and others. Students are given weekly coding assignments and a final project to hone their skills. Recommended for programmers with some background and experience in other languages.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course is a fast-paced introduction to the C and C++ programming languages, with an emphasis on good programming practices and how to be an effective programmer in these languages. Topics include object-oriented programming, memory management, advantages of C and C++, optimization, and others. Students are given weekly coding assignments and a final project to hone their skills. Recommended for programmers with some background and experience in other languages.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

programming | programming | C | C | C++ | C++ | structure | structure | object-oriented | object-oriented | code | code | memory | memory | abstraction | abstraction | assembly | assembly | stack | stack | software | software | inheritance | inheritance | scope | scope | design | design | environment | environment | cost | cost | code review | code review | project | project | best practice | best practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.370 The Battlecode Programming Competition (MIT)

Description

This course is conducted as an artificial intelligence programming contest in Java. Students work in teams to program virtual robots to play Battlecode, a real-time strategy game. Optional lectures are provided on topics and programming practices relevant to the game, and students learn and improve their programming skills experientially. The competition culminates in a live Battlecode tournament. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

Battlecode | programming | artificial intelligence | distributed algorithm | network communication | robot | team | code | build | strategy | player | game | pathing | search | navigation | computation | data | structure | debugging | bytecode | method | cost | Git | repository | swarm | spawn time | heuristics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT) Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films. This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films.

Subjects

Latina | Latina | women | women | code-switching | code-switching | first generation | first generation | coming-of-age | coming-of-age | Chicana | Chicana | roots | roots | revolution | revolution | politics | politics | poverty | | poverty | | social criticism | social criticism | kinship | kinship | biography | biography | magic realism | magic realism | mythical historicism | mythical historicism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT) 7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT)

Description

The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und

Subjects

lethal poison | lethal poison | Ricin | Ricin | Diphtheria | Diphtheria | contagious bacterial disease | contagious bacterial disease | tetracycline | tetracycline | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | drug resistance | drug resistance | protein engineering | protein engineering | cystic fibrosis | cystic fibrosis | muscular dystrophy | muscular dystrophy | ribosome | ribosome | ribosomal proteins | ribosomal proteins | rRNA | rRNA | mRNA | mRNA | tRNA | tRNA | translation factors | translation factors | genetic code | genetic code | E. coli ribosome | E. coli ribosome | prokaryotes | prokaryotes | eukaryotes | eukaryotes | Shiga | Shiga | Diphtheria toxin | Diphtheria toxin | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Chloramphenicol | Chloramphenicol | Aminoglycoside | Aminoglycoside

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ía Preventiva y Comunitaria II (2014) ía Preventiva y Comunitaria II (2014)

Description

La Odontología Preventiva y Comunitaria pretende que el alumno sea capaz de conseguir y mantener la salud bucodental del individuo y de la comunidad a través del desarrollo de conocimientos, actitudes y habilidades básicos y aplicados para la promoción, prevención, diagnóstico y tratamiento integrado de las alteraciones más prevalentes del sistema estomatognático, independientemente que estos métodos preventivos sean aplicados a nivel individual o colectivo. La materia aporta una considerable contribución para adquirir competencias de la titulación, teniendo su estudio continuación con todas las disciplinas que integran el currículum del grado en Odontología. La Odontología Preventiva y Comunitaria pretende que el alumno sea capaz de conseguir y mantener la salud bucodental del individuo y de la comunidad a través del desarrollo de conocimientos, actitudes y habilidades básicos y aplicados para la promoción, prevención, diagnóstico y tratamiento integrado de las alteraciones más prevalentes del sistema estomatognático, independientemente que estos métodos preventivos sean aplicados a nivel individual o colectivo. La materia aporta una considerable contribución para adquirir competencias de la titulación, teniendo su estudio continuación con todas las disciplinas que integran el currículum del grado en Odontología.

Subjects

úor | úor | salud bucodental | salud bucodental | ía | ía | selladores fosas | selladores fosas | ón de esmalte | ón de esmalte

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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RES.2-005 Girls Who Build: Make Your Own Wearables Workshop (MIT) RES.2-005 Girls Who Build: Make Your Own Wearables Workshop (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. The Girls Who Build: Make Your Own Wearables workshop for high school girls is an introduction to computer science, electrical and mechanical engineering through wearable technology. The workshop, developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory, consists of two major hands-on projects in manufacturing and wearable electronics. These include 3D printing jewelry and laser cutting a purse, as well as programming LEDs to light up when walking. Participants learn the design process, 3D computer modeling, and machine shop tools, in addition to writing code and building a circuit. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. The Girls Who Build: Make Your Own Wearables workshop for high school girls is an introduction to computer science, electrical and mechanical engineering through wearable technology. The workshop, developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory, consists of two major hands-on projects in manufacturing and wearable electronics. These include 3D printing jewelry and laser cutting a purse, as well as programming LEDs to light up when walking. Participants learn the design process, 3D computer modeling, and machine shop tools, in addition to writing code and building a circuit.

Subjects

high school | high school | workshop | workshop | women in STEM | women in STEM | fashion | fashion | jewelry | jewelry | 3D printing | 3D printing | laser cut | laser cut | wearable | wearable | programming | programming | Arduino | Arduino | manufacturing | manufacturing | mechanical design | mechanical design | circuits | circuits | code | code

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.575J Women in South Asia from 1800 to Present (MIT) 21H.575J Women in South Asia from 1800 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce and help students understand the changes and continuities in the lives of women in South Asia from a historical perspective. Using gender as a lens of examining the past, we will examine how politics of race, class, caste and religion affected and continue to impact women in South Asian countries, primarily in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. We will reflect upon current debates within South Asian women's history in order to examine some of the issues and problems that arise in re-writing the past from a gendered perspective and these are found in primary documents, secondary readings, films, newspaper articles, and the Internet. This course is designed to introduce and help students understand the changes and continuities in the lives of women in South Asia from a historical perspective. Using gender as a lens of examining the past, we will examine how politics of race, class, caste and religion affected and continue to impact women in South Asian countries, primarily in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. We will reflect upon current debates within South Asian women's history in order to examine some of the issues and problems that arise in re-writing the past from a gendered perspective and these are found in primary documents, secondary readings, films, newspaper articles, and the Internet.

Subjects

21H.575 | 21H.575 | WGS.459 | WGS.459 | mother | mother | daughter | daughter | in-law | in-law | wive | wive | courtesan | courtesan | concubine | concubine | divinities | divinities | devotee | devotee | social reform | social reform | india | india | education | education | religion | religion | gender | gender | law | law | colonial india | colonial india | british empire | british empire | good wife | good wife | harem | harem | political participation | political participation | women's work | women's work | empower | empower | birth control | birth control | gandhi | gandhi | public health | public health | activism | activism | partition | partition | dowry | dowry | rape | rape | sati | sati | civil code | civil code | religious fundamentalism | religious fundamentalism | sexualty | sexualty | popular culture | popular culture | globalization | globalization | feminism | feminism | south asian women | south asian women

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT) 9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT)

Description

An introduction to human information processing and learning; topics include the nature of mental representation and processing; the architecture of memory; pattern recognition; attention; imagery and mental codes; concepts and prototypes; reasoning and problem solving. An introduction to human information processing and learning; topics include the nature of mental representation and processing; the architecture of memory; pattern recognition; attention; imagery and mental codes; concepts and prototypes; reasoning and problem solving.

Subjects

human | human | information processing | information processing | learning | learning | mental representation | mental representation | processing | processing | architecture of memory | architecture of memory | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | attention | attention | imagery | imagery | mental codes | mental codes | concepts | concepts | prototypes | prototypes | reasoning | reasoning | problem solving | problem solving

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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