Searching for cognitive science : 36 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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9.63 Laboratory in Visual Cognition (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Visual Cognition (MIT)

Description

9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. 9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | human perception | human perception | cognition | cognition | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | signal detection theory | signal detection theory | single factor design | single factor design | factorial design | factorial design | matlab | matlab | correlational studies | correlational studies | ethics in research | ethics in research | visual cognition | visual cognition | thought | thought | psychology and cognitive science | psychology and cognitive science | information processing | information processing | organization of visual cognitive abilities. | organization of visual cognitive abilities.

License

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9.66J Computational Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.66J Computational Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to computational theories of human cognition. Drawing on formal models from classic and contemporary artificial intelligence, students will explore fundamental issues in human knowledge representation, inductive learning and reasoning. What are the forms that our knowledge of the world takes? What are the inductive principles that allow us to acquire new knowledge from the interaction of prior knowledge with observed data? What kinds of data must be available to human learners, and what kinds of innate knowledge (if any) must they have? This course is an introduction to computational theories of human cognition. Drawing on formal models from classic and contemporary artificial intelligence, students will explore fundamental issues in human knowledge representation, inductive learning and reasoning. What are the forms that our knowledge of the world takes? What are the inductive principles that allow us to acquire new knowledge from the interaction of prior knowledge with observed data? What kinds of data must be available to human learners, and what kinds of innate knowledge (if any) must they have?

Subjects

computational theory | computational theory | human cognition | human cognition | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | human knowledge representation | human knowledge representation | inductive learning | inductive learning | inductive reasoning | inductive reasoning | innate knowledge | innate knowledge | machine learning | machine learning | cognitive science | cognitive science | computational cognitive science | computational cognitive science | 9.66 | 9.66 | 6.804 | 6.804

License

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | imaging | imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | impluse | impluse | brain imaging | brain imaging | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | mental focus | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. 9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | human perception | human perception | cognition | cognition | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | signal detection theory | signal detection theory | single factor design | single factor design | factorial design | factorial design | matlab | matlab | correlational studies | correlational studies | ethics in research | ethics in research

License

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Neurotransmitters (MIT) Neurotransmitters (MIT)

Description

Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation. Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation.

Subjects

brain | brain | cultural object | cultural object | contemporary media | contemporary media | science | science | society | society | cultural assumptions | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | neuroscience | anthropology | anthropology | history | history | semiotics | semiotics | cognitive sciences | cognitive sciences | historical views | historical views | digital images | digital images | psychopharmacology | psychopharmacology | mental illness | mental illness | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | brain science | brain science

License

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4.341 Introduction to Photography and Related Media (MIT) 4.341 Introduction to Photography and Related Media (MIT)

Description

This course provides practical instruction in the fundamentals of analog and digital SLR and medium/large format camera operation, film exposure and development, black and white darkroom techniques, digital imaging, and studio lighting. This semester we will explore the MIT Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences for our theme- and site-specific term project, which provides opportunities to develop technical skills and experimental photographic techniques, and for personal artistic exploration. Final projects will be presented on site in exhibition format. Work in progress is continuously presented and discussed in a critical forum. Lectures, readings, visiting professionals, group discussions, and site visits encourage aesthetic appreciation of the medium and a deeper understanding of This course provides practical instruction in the fundamentals of analog and digital SLR and medium/large format camera operation, film exposure and development, black and white darkroom techniques, digital imaging, and studio lighting. This semester we will explore the MIT Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences for our theme- and site-specific term project, which provides opportunities to develop technical skills and experimental photographic techniques, and for personal artistic exploration. Final projects will be presented on site in exhibition format. Work in progress is continuously presented and discussed in a critical forum. Lectures, readings, visiting professionals, group discussions, and site visits encourage aesthetic appreciation of the medium and a deeper understanding of

Subjects

Photography | Photography | digital photography | digital photography | SLR camera | SLR camera | medium format camera | medium format camera | large format camera | large format camera | black and white photography | black and white photography | digital imaging | digital imaging | brain and cognitive sciences | brain and cognitive sciences | experimental photographic techniques | experimental photographic techniques | studio exhibition | studio exhibition | artistic exploration | artistic exploration | vision | vision

License

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24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT) 24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists.

Subjects

brain | brain | philosophy | philosophy | science | science | holism | holism | cultural object | cultural object | contemporary media | contemporary media | society | society | cultural assumptions | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | neuroscience | anthropology | anthropology | history | history | semiotics | semiotics | cognitive sciences | cognitive sciences | historical views | historical views | digital images | digital images | psychopharmacology | psychopharmacology | mental illness | mental illness | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | brain science | brain science

License

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9.93 Marathon Moral Reasoning Laboratory (MIT) 9.93 Marathon Moral Reasoning Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This seminar focuses on the cognitive science of moral reasoning. Philosophers debate how we decide which moral actions are permissible. Is it permissible to take one human life in order to save others? We have powerful and surprisingly rich and subtle intuitions to such questions.In this class, you will learn how intuitions can be studied using formal analytical paradigms and behavioral experiments. Thursday evening, meet to learn about recent advances in theories of moral reasoning. Overnight, formulate a hypothesis about the structure of moral reasoning and design a questionnaire-based experiment to test this. Friday, present and select 1-2 proposals and collect data; we will then reconvene to analyze and discuss results and implications for the structure of the moral mind.This course i This seminar focuses on the cognitive science of moral reasoning. Philosophers debate how we decide which moral actions are permissible. Is it permissible to take one human life in order to save others? We have powerful and surprisingly rich and subtle intuitions to such questions.In this class, you will learn how intuitions can be studied using formal analytical paradigms and behavioral experiments. Thursday evening, meet to learn about recent advances in theories of moral reasoning. Overnight, formulate a hypothesis about the structure of moral reasoning and design a questionnaire-based experiment to test this. Friday, present and select 1-2 proposals and collect data; we will then reconvene to analyze and discuss results and implications for the structure of the moral mind.This course i

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | moral actions | moral actions | permissible | permissible | human life | human life | intuition | intuition | analytical paradigm | analytical paradigm | behavioral experiment | behavioral experiment | questionnaire | questionnaire | experiment | experiment | structure of human mind | structure of human mind

License

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9.012 The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II (MIT) 9.012 The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II (MIT)

Description

This class is the second half of an intensive survey of cognitive science for first-year graduate students. Topics include visual perception, language, memory, cognitive architecture, learning, reasoning, decision-making, and cognitive development. Topics covered are from behavioral, computational, and neural perspectives. This class is the second half of an intensive survey of cognitive science for first-year graduate students. Topics include visual perception, language, memory, cognitive architecture, learning, reasoning, decision-making, and cognitive development. Topics covered are from behavioral, computational, and neural perspectives.

Subjects

brain | brain | behavioral | behavioral | perception | perception | attention | attention | working memory | working memory | recognition | recognition | recall | recall | language | language | cognitive science | cognitive science | computation | computation | visual perception | visual perception | memory | memory | cognitive architecture | cognitive architecture | learning | learning | reasoning | reasoning | decision-making | decision-making | cognitive development | cognitive development | behavioral perspective | behavioral perspective | computational perspective | computational perspective | neural perspective | neural perspective

License

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9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT) 9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving. This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | cognitive processes | cognitive processes | cognition | cognition | the mind | the mind | object recognition | object recognition | attention | attention | memory | memory | associative memory | associative memory | learning | learning | implicit memory | implicit memory | conceptual short term memory | conceptual short term memory | working memory | working memory | language | language | concepts | concepts | prototypes | prototypes | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | visual knowledge | visual knowledge | mental codes | mental codes | judgement | judgement | reasoning | reasoning | problem-solving | problem-solving | conscious thought | conscious thought | unconscious thought | unconscious thought

License

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9.69 Foundations of Cognition (MIT) 9.69 Foundations of Cognition (MIT)

Description

Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project i Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project i

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | Western philosophy | Western philosophy | structure | structure | color | color | objects | objects | number | number | similarity | similarity | inductive inference | inductive inference | space | space | time | time | reasoning | reasoning | decision-making | decision-making | morality | morality | consciousness | consciousness | development | development | psychology | psychology | computation | computation | neuroscience | neuroscience | philosophy | philosophy | linguistics | linguistics | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence

License

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9.012 The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II (MIT) 9.012 The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second half of the intensive survey of brain and behavioral studies for first-year graduate students in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences curriculum. Each module of this core course involves a series of overview lectures by leading researchers in the field. By offering a thorough introduction to the current state of the discipline while emphasizing critical thinking, the course aims to prepare students as cognitive scientists. Topics include: perception, attention, working memory, recognition and recall, language, and other issues in cognitive science. Topics are covered from the neural, behavioral and computational perspectives. This course is the second half of the intensive survey of brain and behavioral studies for first-year graduate students in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences curriculum. Each module of this core course involves a series of overview lectures by leading researchers in the field. By offering a thorough introduction to the current state of the discipline while emphasizing critical thinking, the course aims to prepare students as cognitive scientists. Topics include: perception, attention, working memory, recognition and recall, language, and other issues in cognitive science. Topics are covered from the neural, behavioral and computational perspectives.

Subjects

brain | brain | brain | | brain | | behavioral | | behavioral | | behavioral | behavioral | perception | perception | attention | attention | working memory | working memory | recognition | recognition | recall | recall | language | language | cognitive science | cognitive science | computation | computation

License

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24.941J The Lexicon and Its Features (MIT) 24.941J The Lexicon and Its Features (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of the distinctive features which distinguish sound categories of languages of the world. Theories which relate these categories to their acoustic and articulatory correlates, both universally and in particular languages, are covered. Models of word recognition by listeners, features, and phonological structure are also discussed. In addition, the course offers a variety of perspectives on these issues, drawn from Electrical Engineering, Linguistics and Cognitive Science. This course provides an overview of the distinctive features which distinguish sound categories of languages of the world. Theories which relate these categories to their acoustic and articulatory correlates, both universally and in particular languages, are covered. Models of word recognition by listeners, features, and phonological structure are also discussed. In addition, the course offers a variety of perspectives on these issues, drawn from Electrical Engineering, Linguistics and Cognitive Science.

Subjects

24.941 | 24.941 | 6.543 | 6.543 | 9.587 | 9.587 | HST.727 | HST.727 | lexicon | lexicon | features | features | sound categories | sound categories | acoustic and articulatory correlates | acoustic and articulatory correlates | languages | languages | models of word recognition | models of word recognition | linguistics | linguistics | cognitive science | cognitive science

License

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MAS.742 Industrial Design Intelligence: A Cognitive Approach to Engineering (MIT) MAS.742 Industrial Design Intelligence: A Cognitive Approach to Engineering (MIT)

Description

This class investigates cognitive science and technology as it is applied to the industrial design process. The class introduces prototyping techniques and approaches for objective evaluation as part of the design process. Students practice evaluating products with mechanical and electronic aspects. Evaluation processes are applied to creating functioning smart product prototypes. This is a project oriented subject that draws upon engineering, aesthetic, and creative skills. It is geared toward students interested in creating physical products which encompass electronics and computers, aimed at including them in smart scenarios. Students in the class will present readings, learn prototyping skills, create a product prototype, and complete a publication style paper. This class investigates cognitive science and technology as it is applied to the industrial design process. The class introduces prototyping techniques and approaches for objective evaluation as part of the design process. Students practice evaluating products with mechanical and electronic aspects. Evaluation processes are applied to creating functioning smart product prototypes. This is a project oriented subject that draws upon engineering, aesthetic, and creative skills. It is geared toward students interested in creating physical products which encompass electronics and computers, aimed at including them in smart scenarios. Students in the class will present readings, learn prototyping skills, create a product prototype, and complete a publication style paper.

Subjects

industrial design | industrial design | architecture | architecture | media design | media design | fabrication | fabrication | customization | customization | waterjet cutter | waterjet cutter | 3D printing | 3D printing | 3D milling | 3D milling | CNC machines | CNC machines | CAD/CAM | CAD/CAM | product design | product design | intelligent design | intelligent design | cognitive science | cognitive science | model making | model making | prototyping | prototyping | machining | machining | milling | milling

License

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | brain imaging | brain imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | attention | attention | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

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9.69 Foundations of Cognition (MIT) 9.69 Foundations of Cognition (MIT)

Description

Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project i Advances in cognitive science have resolved, clarified, and sometimes complicated some of the great questions of Western philosophy: what is the structure of the world and how do we come to know it; does everyone represent the world the same way; what is the best way for us to act in the world. Specific topics include color, objects, number, categories, similarity, inductive inference, space, time, causality, reasoning, decision-making, morality and consciousness. Readings and discussion include a brief philosophical history of each topic and focus on advances in cognitive and developmental psychology, computation, neuroscience, and related fields. At least one subject in cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, or artificial intelligence is required. An additional project i

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | Western philosophy | Western philosophy | structure | structure | color | color | objects | objects | number | number | similarity | similarity | inductive inference | inductive inference | space | space | time | time | reasoning | reasoning | decision-making | decision-making | morality | morality | consciousness | consciousness | development | development | psychology | psychology | computation | computation | neuroscience | neuroscience | philosophy | philosophy | linguistics | linguistics | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence

License

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In conversation with Steven Pinker

Description

Experimental psychologist, cognitive scientist, linguist, and popular science author Steven Pinker fields questions from Graduate students at Wolfson College. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

experimental psychology | cognitive science | linguistics | experimental psychology | cognitive science | linguistics | 2014-02-27

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Visual Cognition (MIT)

Description

9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

cognitive science | human perception | cognition | statistical analysis | signal detection theory | single factor design | factorial design | matlab | correlational studies | ethics in research | visual cognition | thought | psychology and cognitive science | information processing | organization of visual cognitive abilities.

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9.66J Computational Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to computational theories of human cognition. Drawing on formal models from classic and contemporary artificial intelligence, students will explore fundamental issues in human knowledge representation, inductive learning and reasoning. What are the forms that our knowledge of the world takes? What are the inductive principles that allow us to acquire new knowledge from the interaction of prior knowledge with observed data? What kinds of data must be available to human learners, and what kinds of innate knowledge (if any) must they have?

Subjects

computational theory | human cognition | artificial intelligence | human knowledge representation | inductive learning | inductive reasoning | innate knowledge | machine learning | cognitive science | computational cognitive science | 9.66 | 6.804

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9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive processes | cognition | the mind | object recognition | attention | memory | associative memory | learning | implicit memory | conceptual short term memory | working memory | language | concepts | prototypes | psycholinguistics | visual knowledge | mental codes | judgement | reasoning | problem-solving | conscious thought | unconscious thought

License

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MAS.742 Industrial Design Intelligence: A Cognitive Approach to Engineering (MIT)

Description

This class investigates cognitive science and technology as it is applied to the industrial design process. The class introduces prototyping techniques and approaches for objective evaluation as part of the design process. Students practice evaluating products with mechanical and electronic aspects. Evaluation processes are applied to creating functioning smart product prototypes. This is a project oriented subject that draws upon engineering, aesthetic, and creative skills. It is geared toward students interested in creating physical products which encompass electronics and computers, aimed at including them in smart scenarios. Students in the class will present readings, learn prototyping skills, create a product prototype, and complete a publication style paper.

Subjects

industrial design | architecture | media design | fabrication | customization | waterjet cutter | 3D printing | 3D milling | CNC machines | CAD/CAM | product design | intelligent design | cognitive science | model making | prototyping | machining | milling

License

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9.012 The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second half of the intensive survey of brain and behavioral studies for first-year graduate students in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences curriculum. Each module of this core course involves a series of overview lectures by leading researchers in the field. By offering a thorough introduction to the current state of the discipline while emphasizing critical thinking, the course aims to prepare students as cognitive scientists. Topics include: perception, attention, working memory, recognition and recall, language, and other issues in cognitive science. Topics are covered from the neural, behavioral and computational perspectives.

Subjects

brain | brain | | behavioral | | behavioral | perception | attention | working memory | recognition | recall | language | cognitive science | computation

License

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | imaging | MRI | CT scan | fMRI | brain | mind | impluse | brain imaging | morality | moral reasoning | decision making | intelligence | empathy | trust | religion | love | emotion | gender differences | sexuality | stress | prejudice | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | witness | courtroom testimony | addiction | violence | learning | behavior

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

cognitive science | human perception | cognition | statistical analysis | signal detection theory | single factor design | factorial design | matlab | correlational studies | ethics in research

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Neurotransmitters (MIT)

Description

Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation.

Subjects

brain | cultural object | contemporary media | science | society | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | anthropology | history | semiotics | cognitive sciences | historical views | digital images | psychopharmacology | mental illness | neurotransmitters | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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