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22.616 Plasma Transport Theory (MIT) 22.616 Plasma Transport Theory (MIT)

Description

This course describes the processes by which mass, momentum, and energy are transported in plasmas, with special reference to magnetic confinement fusion applications. The Fokker-Planck collision operator and its limiting forms, as well as collisional relaxation and equilibrium, are considered in detail. Special applications include a Lorentz gas, Brownian motion, alpha particles, and runaway electrons. The Braginskii formulation of classical collisional transport in general geometry based on the Fokker-Planck equation is presented. Neoclassical transport in tokamaks, which is sensitive to the details of the magnetic geometry, is considered in the high (Pfirsch-Schluter), low (banana) and intermediate (plateau) regimes of collisionality. This course describes the processes by which mass, momentum, and energy are transported in plasmas, with special reference to magnetic confinement fusion applications. The Fokker-Planck collision operator and its limiting forms, as well as collisional relaxation and equilibrium, are considered in detail. Special applications include a Lorentz gas, Brownian motion, alpha particles, and runaway electrons. The Braginskii formulation of classical collisional transport in general geometry based on the Fokker-Planck equation is presented. Neoclassical transport in tokamaks, which is sensitive to the details of the magnetic geometry, is considered in the high (Pfirsch-Schluter), low (banana) and intermediate (plateau) regimes of collisionality.

Subjects

Plasmas | Plasmas | magnetic confinement fusion | magnetic confinement fusion | Fokker-Planck collision operator | Fokker-Planck collision operator | collisional relaxation and equilibrium | collisional relaxation and equilibrium | Lorentz gas | Lorentz gas | Brownian motion | Brownian motion | alpha particles | alpha particles | runaway electrons | runaway electrons | Braginskii formulation | Braginskii formulation | tokamak | tokamak | Pfirsch-Schluter | Pfirsch-Schluter | regimes of collisionality | regimes of collisionality

License

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22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT) 22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT)

Description

This subject deals with foundational knowledge for all students in NED. Emphasis is on nuclear concepts (as opposed to traditional nuclear physics), especially nuclear radiations and their interactions with matter. We will study different types of reactions, single-collision phenomena (cross sections) and leave the effects of many collisions to later subjects (22.105 and 22.106). Quantum mechanics is used at a lower level than in 22.51 and 22.106. This subject deals with foundational knowledge for all students in NED. Emphasis is on nuclear concepts (as opposed to traditional nuclear physics), especially nuclear radiations and their interactions with matter. We will study different types of reactions, single-collision phenomena (cross sections) and leave the effects of many collisions to later subjects (22.105 and 22.106). Quantum mechanics is used at a lower level than in 22.51 and 22.106.

Subjects

nuclear concepts | nuclear concepts | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | nuclear radiations | nuclear radiations | matter | matter | types of reactions | types of reactions | single-collision phenomena | single-collision phenomena | cross sections | cross sections | effects of many collisions | effects of many collisions | Quantum mechanics | Quantum mechanics

License

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22.106 Neutron Interactions and Applications (MIT) 22.106 Neutron Interactions and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course is  a foundational study of the effects of single and multiple interactions on neutron distributions and their applications to problems across the Nuclear Engineering department - fission, fusion, and RST. Particle simulation methods are introduced to deal with complex processes that cannot be studied only experimentally or by numerical solutions of equations. Treatment will emphasize basic concepts and understanding, as well as showing the underlying scientific connections with current research areas. This course is  a foundational study of the effects of single and multiple interactions on neutron distributions and their applications to problems across the Nuclear Engineering department - fission, fusion, and RST. Particle simulation methods are introduced to deal with complex processes that cannot be studied only experimentally or by numerical solutions of equations. Treatment will emphasize basic concepts and understanding, as well as showing the underlying scientific connections with current research areas.

Subjects

neutron distributions | neutron distributions | fission | fission | fusion | fusion | RST | RST | Particle simulation methods | Particle simulation methods | complex processes | complex processes | numerical solutions of equations | numerical solutions of equations | basic concepts | basic concepts | underlying scientific connections | underlying scientific connections | current research areas | current research areas | angular distributions | angular distributions | energy distributions | energy distributions | single collision | single collision | multiple collisions | multiple collisions | neutron interactions | neutron interactions | elastic scattering | elastic scattering | inelastic scattering | inelastic scattering | MCNP | MCNP | Monte Carlo | Monte Carlo | molecular dynamics | molecular dynamics

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8.01 Physics I (MIT) 8.01 Physics I (MIT)

Description

Physics I is a first-year physics course which introduces students to classical mechanics. Topics include: space and time; straight-line kinematics; motion in a plane; forces and equilibrium; experimental basis of Newton's laws; particle dynamics; universal gravitation; collisions and conservation laws; work and potential energy; vibrational motion; conservative forces; inertial forces and non-inertial frames; central force motions; rigid bodies and rotational dynamics. Physics I is a first-year physics course which introduces students to classical mechanics. Topics include: space and time; straight-line kinematics; motion in a plane; forces and equilibrium; experimental basis of Newton's laws; particle dynamics; universal gravitation; collisions and conservation laws; work and potential energy; vibrational motion; conservative forces; inertial forces and non-inertial frames; central force motions; rigid bodies and rotational dynamics.

Subjects

classical mechanics | classical mechanics | Space and time | Space and time | straight-line kinematics | straight-line kinematics | motion in a plane | motion in a plane | experimental basis of Newton's laws | experimental basis of Newton's laws | particle dynamics | particle dynamics | universal gravitation | universal gravitation | collisions and conservation laws | collisions and conservation laws | work and potential energy | work and potential energy | vibrational motion | vibrational motion | conservative forces | conservative forces | central force motions | central force motions | inertial forces and non-inertial frames | inertial forces and non-inertial frames | rigid bodies and rotational dynamics | rigid bodies and rotational dynamics | forces and equilibrium | forces and equilibrium | space | space | time | time | space-time | space-time | planar motion | planar motion | forces | forces | equilibrium | equilibrium | Newton?s laws | Newton?s laws | collisions | collisions | conservation laws | conservation laws | work | work | potential energy | potential energy | inertial forces | inertial forces | non-inertial forces | non-inertial forces | rigid bodies | rigid bodies | rotational dynamics | rotational dynamics

License

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8.422 Atomic and Optical Physics II (MIT) 8.422 Atomic and Optical Physics II (MIT)

Description

This is the second of a two-semester subject sequence beginning with Atomic and Optical Physics I (8.421) that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include non-classical states of light, multi-photon processes, coherence, trapping and cooling, atomic interactions, and experimental methods. This is the second of a two-semester subject sequence beginning with Atomic and Optical Physics I (8.421) that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include non-classical states of light, multi-photon processes, coherence, trapping and cooling, atomic interactions, and experimental methods.

Subjects

atomic | atomic | optical physics | optical physics | Non-classical states of light | Non-classical states of light | squeezed states | squeezed states | multi-photon processes | multi-photon processes | Raman scattering | Raman scattering | coherence | coherence | level crossings | level crossings | quantum beats | quantum beats | double resonance | double resonance | superradiance | superradiance | trapping and cooling | trapping and cooling | light forces | light forces | laser cooling | laser cooling | atom optics | atom optics | spectroscopy of trapped atoms and ions | spectroscopy of trapped atoms and ions | atomic interactions | atomic interactions | classical collisions | classical collisions | quantum scattering theory | quantum scattering theory | ultracold collisions | ultracold collisions | experimental methods | experimental methods

License

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22.616 Plasma Transport Theory (MIT)

Description

This course describes the processes by which mass, momentum, and energy are transported in plasmas, with special reference to magnetic confinement fusion applications. The Fokker-Planck collision operator and its limiting forms, as well as collisional relaxation and equilibrium, are considered in detail. Special applications include a Lorentz gas, Brownian motion, alpha particles, and runaway electrons. The Braginskii formulation of classical collisional transport in general geometry based on the Fokker-Planck equation is presented. Neoclassical transport in tokamaks, which is sensitive to the details of the magnetic geometry, is considered in the high (Pfirsch-Schluter), low (banana) and intermediate (plateau) regimes of collisionality.

Subjects

Plasmas | magnetic confinement fusion | Fokker-Planck collision operator | collisional relaxation and equilibrium | Lorentz gas | Brownian motion | alpha particles | runaway electrons | Braginskii formulation | tokamak | Pfirsch-Schluter | regimes of collisionality

License

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22.616 Plasma Transport Theory (MIT)

Description

This course describes the processes by which mass, momentum, and energy are transported in plasmas, with special reference to magnetic confinement fusion applications. The Fokker-Planck collision operator and its limiting forms, as well as collisional relaxation and equilibrium, are considered in detail. Special applications include a Lorentz gas, Brownian motion, alpha particles, and runaway electrons. The Braginskii formulation of classical collisional transport in general geometry based on the Fokker-Planck equation is presented. Neoclassical transport in tokamaks, which is sensitive to the details of the magnetic geometry, is considered in the high (Pfirsch-Schluter), low (banana) and intermediate (plateau) regimes of collisionality.

Subjects

Plasmas | magnetic confinement fusion | Fokker-Planck collision operator | collisional relaxation and equilibrium | Lorentz gas | Brownian motion | alpha particles | runaway electrons | Braginskii formulation | tokamak | Pfirsch-Schluter | regimes of collisionality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.62 Physical Chemistry II (MIT) 5.62 Physical Chemistry II (MIT)

Description

This subject deals primarily with elementary statistical mechanics, transport properties, kinetic theory, solid state, reaction rate theory, and chemical reaction dynamics.AcknowledgementsThe lecture note materials for this course include contributions from Professor Sylvia T. Ceyer. The Staff for this course would like to acknowledge that these course materials include contributions from past instructors, textbooks, and other members of the MIT Chemistry Department affiliated with course #5.62. Since the following works have evolved over a period of many years, no single source can be attributed. This subject deals primarily with elementary statistical mechanics, transport properties, kinetic theory, solid state, reaction rate theory, and chemical reaction dynamics.AcknowledgementsThe lecture note materials for this course include contributions from Professor Sylvia T. Ceyer. The Staff for this course would like to acknowledge that these course materials include contributions from past instructors, textbooks, and other members of the MIT Chemistry Department affiliated with course #5.62. Since the following works have evolved over a period of many years, no single source can be attributed.

Subjects

physical chemistry | physical chemistry | partition functions | partition functions | atomic degrees of freedom | atomic degrees of freedom | molecular degrees of freedom | molecular degrees of freedom | chemical equilibrium | chemical equilibrium | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | intermolecular potentials | intermolecular potentials | equations of state | equations of state | solid state chemistry | solid state chemistry | einstein and debye solids | einstein and debye solids | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | rate theory | rate theory | chemical kinetics | chemical kinetics | transition state theory | transition state theory | RRKM theory | RRKM theory | collision theory | collision theory | equipartition | equipartition | fermi-dirac statistics | fermi-dirac statistics | boltzmann statistics | boltzmann statistics | bose-einstein statistics | bose-einstein statistics | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics

License

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22.611J Introduction To Plasma Physics I (MIT) 22.611J Introduction To Plasma Physics I (MIT)

Description

Introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics. Basic plasma properties and collective behavior. Coulomb collisions and transport processes. Motion of charged particles in magnetic fields; plasma confinement schemes. MHD models; simple equilibrium and stability analysis. Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models; wave propagation in a magnetic field.Introduces kinetic theory; Vlasov plasma model; electron plasma waves and Landau damping; ion-acoustic waves; streaming instabilities. A subject description tailored to fit the background and interests of the attending students distributed shortly before and at the beginning of the subject. Introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics. Basic plasma properties and collective behavior. Coulomb collisions and transport processes. Motion of charged particles in magnetic fields; plasma confinement schemes. MHD models; simple equilibrium and stability analysis. Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models; wave propagation in a magnetic field.Introduces kinetic theory; Vlasov plasma model; electron plasma waves and Landau damping; ion-acoustic waves; streaming instabilities. A subject description tailored to fit the background and interests of the attending students distributed shortly before and at the beginning of the subject.

Subjects

plasma phenomena | plasma phenomena | energy generation | energy generation | thermonuclear fusion | thermonuclear fusion | astrophysics | astrophysics | Coulomb collisions | Coulomb collisions | transport processes | transport processes | plasma confinement schemes | | plasma confinement schemes | | MHD models | MHD models | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | Vlasov plasma model | Vlasov plasma model | electron plasma waves | electron plasma waves | Landau damping | Landau damping | ion-acoustic waves | ion-acoustic waves | streaming instabilities | streaming instabilities | 22.611 | 22.611 | 6.651 | 6.651 | 8.613 | 8.613

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8.033 Relativity (MIT) 8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay. Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay.

Subjects

Einstein's postulates | Einstein's postulates | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects and paradoxes | relativistic effects and paradoxes | Minkowski diagrams | Minkowski diagrams | invariants and four-vectors | invariants and four-vectors | momentum | energy and mass | momentum | energy and mass | particle collisions | particle collisions | Relativity and electricity | Relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | General Relativity | General Relativity | principle of equivalence | principle of equivalence | the Schwarzchild metric | the Schwarzchild metric | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | gravitational red shift | particle trajectories | particle trajectories | light trajectories | light trajectories | invariants | invariants | four-vectors | four-vectors | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | mass | mass | relativistic effects | relativistic effects | paradoxes | paradoxes | electricity | electricity | time dilation | time dilation | length contraction | length contraction | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | Schwarzchild metric | Schwarzchild metric | geodesics | geodesics | Shaprio delay | Shaprio delay | relativistic kinematics | relativistic kinematics | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | hubble expansion | hubble expansion | universe | universe | equivalence principle | equivalence principle | curved space time | curved space time | Ether Theory | Ether Theory | constants | constants | speed of light | speed of light | c | c | graph | graph | pythagorem theorem | pythagorem theorem | triangle | triangle | arrows | arrows

License

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT) 8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments.  Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, 8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments.  Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories,

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC) | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.62 Physical Chemistry II (MIT) 5.62 Physical Chemistry II (MIT)

Description

This course covers elementary statistical mechanics, transport properties, kinetic theory, solid state, reaction rate theory, and chemical reaction dynamics. Acknowledgements The staff for this course would like to acknowledge that these course materials include contributions from past instructors, textbooks, and other members of the MIT Chemistry Department affiliated with course #5.62. Since the following works have evolved over a period of many years, no single source can be attributed. This course covers elementary statistical mechanics, transport properties, kinetic theory, solid state, reaction rate theory, and chemical reaction dynamics. Acknowledgements The staff for this course would like to acknowledge that these course materials include contributions from past instructors, textbooks, and other members of the MIT Chemistry Department affiliated with course #5.62. Since the following works have evolved over a period of many years, no single source can be attributed.

Subjects

physical chemistry | physical chemistry | partition functions | partition functions | atomic degrees of freedom | atomic degrees of freedom | molecular degrees of freedom | molecular degrees of freedom | chemical equilibrium | chemical equilibrium | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | intermolecular potentials | intermolecular potentials | equations of state | equations of state | solid state chemistry | solid state chemistry | einstein and debye solids | einstein and debye solids | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | rate theory | rate theory | chemical kinetics | chemical kinetics | transition state theory | transition state theory | RRKM theory | RRKM theory | collision theory | collision theory | equipartition | equipartition | fermi-dirac statistics | fermi-dirac statistics | boltzmann statistics | boltzmann statistics | bose-einstein statistics | bose-einstein statistics | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.033 Relativity (MIT) 8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

This course, which concentrates on special relativity, is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include Einstein's postulates, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic effects and paradoxes, and applications involving electromagnetism and particle physics. This course also provides a brief introduction to some concepts of general relativity, including the principle of equivalence, the Schwartzschild metric and black holes, and the FRW metric and cosmology. This course, which concentrates on special relativity, is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include Einstein's postulates, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic effects and paradoxes, and applications involving electromagnetism and particle physics. This course also provides a brief introduction to some concepts of general relativity, including the principle of equivalence, the Schwartzschild metric and black holes, and the FRW metric and cosmology.

Subjects

relativity | relativity | special relativity | special relativity | Einstein's postulates | Einstein's postulates | simultaneity | simultaneity | time dilation | time dilation | length contraction | length contraction | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects | relativistic effects | Minkowski diagrams | Minkowski diagrams | relativistic invariants | relativistic invariants | four-vectors | four-vectors | relativitistic particle collisions | relativitistic particle collisions | relativity and electricity | relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | general relativity | general relativity | Schwarzchild metric | Schwarzchild metric | gravitational | gravitational | red shift | red shift | light trajectories | light trajectories | geodesics | geodesics | Shapiro delay | Shapiro delay

License

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT) 8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m 8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC) | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

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8.422 Atomic and Optical Physics II (MIT)

Description

This is the second of a two-semester subject sequence beginning with Atomic and Optical Physics I (8.421) that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include non-classical states of light, multi-photon processes, coherence, trapping and cooling, atomic interactions, and experimental methods.

Subjects

atomic | optical physics | Non-classical states of light | squeezed states | multi-photon processes | Raman scattering | coherence | level crossings | quantum beats | double resonance | superradiance | trapping and cooling | light forces | laser cooling | atom optics | spectroscopy of trapped atoms and ions | atomic interactions | classical collisions | quantum scattering theory | ultracold collisions | experimental methods

License

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8.01T Physics I (MIT) 8.01T Physics I (MIT)

Description

This freshman-level course is an introduction to classical mechanics. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which features small group interaction via table-top experiments utilizing laptops for data acquisition and problem solving workshops. Acknowledgements The TEAL project is supported by The Alex and Brit d'Arbeloff Fund for Excellence in MIT Education, MIT iCampus, the Davis Educational Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Class of 1960 Endowment for Innovation in Education, the Class of 1951 Fund for Excellence in Education, the Class of 1955 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, and the Helena Foundation. This freshman-level course is an introduction to classical mechanics. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which features small group interaction via table-top experiments utilizing laptops for data acquisition and problem solving workshops. Acknowledgements The TEAL project is supported by The Alex and Brit d'Arbeloff Fund for Excellence in MIT Education, MIT iCampus, the Davis Educational Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Class of 1960 Endowment for Innovation in Education, the Class of 1951 Fund for Excellence in Education, the Class of 1955 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, and the Helena Foundation.

Subjects

classical mechanics | classical mechanics | Space and time | Space and time | straight-line kinematics | straight-line kinematics | motion in a plane | motion in a plane | forces and equilibrium | forces and equilibrium | experimental basis of Newton's laws | experimental basis of Newton's laws | particle dynamics | particle dynamics | universal gravitation | universal gravitation | collisions and conservation laws | collisions and conservation laws | work and potential energy | work and potential energy | vibrational motion | vibrational motion | conservative forces | conservative forces | inertial forces and non-inertial frames | inertial forces and non-inertial frames | central force motions | central force motions | rigid bodies | rigid bodies | rotational dynamics | rotational dynamics | rigid bodies and rotational dynamics | rigid bodies and rotational dynamics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.902 Astrophysics II (MIT) 8.902 Astrophysics II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence on astrophysics. Topics include galactic dynamics, groups and clusters on galaxies, phenomenological cosmology, Newtonian cosmology, Roberston-Walker models, and galaxy formation. This is the second course in a two-semester sequence on astrophysics. Topics include galactic dynamics, groups and clusters on galaxies, phenomenological cosmology, Newtonian cosmology, Roberston-Walker models, and galaxy formation.

Subjects

Galactic dynamics | Galactic dynamics | potential theory | potential theory | orbits | orbits | collisionless Boltzmann equations | collisionless Boltzmann equations | Galaxy interactions | Galaxy interactions | Groups and clusters | Groups and clusters | dark matter | dark matter | Intergalactic medium | Intergalactic medium | x-ray clusters | x-ray clusters | Active galactic nuclei | Active galactic nuclei | unified models | unified models | black hole accretion | black hole accretion | radio and optical jets | radio and optical jets | Homogeneity and isotropy | Homogeneity and isotropy | redshift | redshift | galaxy distance ladder | galaxy distance ladder | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | Roberston-Walker models and cosmography | Roberston-Walker models and cosmography | Early universe | Early universe | primordial nucleosynthesis | primordial nucleosynthesis | recombination | recombination | Cosmic microwave background radiation | Cosmic microwave background radiation | Large-scale structure | Large-scale structure | galaxy formation | galaxy formation

License

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12.453 Crosby Lectures in Geology: History of Africa (MIT) 12.453 Crosby Lectures in Geology: History of Africa (MIT)

Description

This course is a series of presentations on an advanced topic in the field of geology by the visiting William Otis Crosby lecturer. The Crosby lectureship is awarded to a distinguished international scientist each year to introduce new scientific perspectives to the MIT community. This year's Crosby lecturer is Prof. Kevin Burke. His lecture is about African history. The basic theme is the distinctiveness of the African continent in both the way that it originated 600 million years ago and in the way that it has developed ever since. This course is a series of presentations on an advanced topic in the field of geology by the visiting William Otis Crosby lecturer. The Crosby lectureship is awarded to a distinguished international scientist each year to introduce new scientific perspectives to the MIT community. This year's Crosby lecturer is Prof. Kevin Burke. His lecture is about African history. The basic theme is the distinctiveness of the African continent in both the way that it originated 600 million years ago and in the way that it has developed ever since.

Subjects

African continent | African continent | Panafrican continental collisions | Panafrican continental collisions | Afro-Arabian plate | Afro-Arabian plate | African plate | African plate | Cambro-Ordovician times | Cambro-Ordovician times | geodynamic evolution | geodynamic evolution

License

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16.72 Air Traffic Control (MIT) 16.72 Air Traffic Control (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the various aspects of present and future Air Traffic Control systems. Among the topics in the present system that we will discuss are the systems-analysis approach to problems of capacity and safety, surveillance, including the National Airspace System and Automated Terminal Radar Systems, navigation subsystem technology, aircraft guidance and control, communications, collision avoidance systems and sequencing and spacing in terminal areas. The class will then talk about future directions and development and have a critical discussion of past proposals and of probable future problem areas. This course introduces the various aspects of present and future Air Traffic Control systems. Among the topics in the present system that we will discuss are the systems-analysis approach to problems of capacity and safety, surveillance, including the National Airspace System and Automated Terminal Radar Systems, navigation subsystem technology, aircraft guidance and control, communications, collision avoidance systems and sequencing and spacing in terminal areas. The class will then talk about future directions and development and have a critical discussion of past proposals and of probable future problem areas.

Subjects

air traffic control | air traffic control | air traffic control systems | air traffic control systems | systems-analysis | systems-analysis | capacity | capacity | safety | safety | surveillance | surveillance | NAS | NAS | ARTS | ARTS | navigation subsystem technology | navigation subsystem technology | aircraft guidance and control | aircraft guidance and control | communications | communications | collision avoidance systems | collision avoidance systems | sequencing and spacing | sequencing and spacing | terminal areas | terminal areas | NGATS | NGATS

License

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22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT) 22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT)

Description

The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is important in fields as diverse as Astrophysics and Controlled Fusion. Plasma is often referred to as "the fourth state of matter." This course introduces the study of the nature and behavior of plasma. A variety of models to describe plasma behavior are presented. The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is important in fields as diverse as Astrophysics and Controlled Fusion. Plasma is often referred to as "the fourth state of matter." This course introduces the study of the nature and behavior of plasma. A variety of models to describe plasma behavior are presented.

Subjects

plasma phenomena | plasma phenomena | energy generation | energy generation | controlled thermonuclear fusion | controlled thermonuclear fusion | astrophysics | astrophysics | Coulomb collisions | Coulomb collisions | transport processes | transport processes | charged particles | charged particles | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | plasma confinement schemes | plasma confinement schemes | MHD models | MHD models | simple equilibrium | simple equilibrium | stability analysis | stability analysis | Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | wave propagation | wave propagation | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | Vlasov plasma model | Vlasov plasma model | electron plasma waves | electron plasma waves | Landau damping | Landau damping | ion-acoustic waves | ion-acoustic waves | streaming instabilities | streaming instabilities

License

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22.103 Microscopic Theory of Transport (MIT) 22.103 Microscopic Theory of Transport (MIT)

Description

Transport is among the most fundamental and widely studied phenomena in science and engineering. This subject will lay out the essential concepts and current understanding, with emphasis on the molecular view, that cut across all disciplinary boundaries. (Suitable for all students in research.) Broad perspectives of transport phenomena From theory and models to computations and simulations Micro/macro coupling Current research insights Transport is among the most fundamental and widely studied phenomena in science and engineering. This subject will lay out the essential concepts and current understanding, with emphasis on the molecular view, that cut across all disciplinary boundaries. (Suitable for all students in research.) Broad perspectives of transport phenomena From theory and models to computations and simulations Micro/macro coupling Current research insights

Subjects

molecular view | molecular view | transport phenomena | transport phenomena | theory | theory | models | models | computations | computations | simulations | simulations | micro/macro coupling | micro/macro coupling | microscopic collisions | microscopic collisions | transport coefficients | transport coefficients | particle transport | particle transport | radiation transport | radiation transport | microscopic kinetic equation | microscopic kinetic equation | boltzmann equation | boltzmann equation | practical engineering fluid models | practical engineering fluid models | kinetic model | kinetic model | nuclear cross sections | nuclear cross sections

License

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22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT) 22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT)

Description

In this course, students will learn about plasmas, the fourth state of matter. The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is of increasing economic importance. Plasmas behave in lots of interesting and sometimes unexpected ways. The course is intended only as a first plasma physics course, but includes critical concepts needed for a foundation for further study. A solid undergraduate background in classical physics, electromagnetic theory including Maxwell's equations, and mathematical familiarity with partial differential equations and complex analysis are prerequisites. The course introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics, coulomb collisions and transport processes, motion of charged particles in magne In this course, students will learn about plasmas, the fourth state of matter. The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is of increasing economic importance. Plasmas behave in lots of interesting and sometimes unexpected ways. The course is intended only as a first plasma physics course, but includes critical concepts needed for a foundation for further study. A solid undergraduate background in classical physics, electromagnetic theory including Maxwell's equations, and mathematical familiarity with partial differential equations and complex analysis are prerequisites. The course introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics, coulomb collisions and transport processes, motion of charged particles in magne

Subjects

plasma phenomena | plasma phenomena | energy generation | energy generation | controlled thermonuclear fusion | controlled thermonuclear fusion | astrophysics | astrophysics | Coulomb collisions | Coulomb collisions | transport processes | transport processes | charged particles | charged particles | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | plasma confinement schemes | plasma confinement schemes | MHD models | MHD models | simple equilibrium | simple equilibrium | stability analysis | stability analysis | Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | wave propagation | wave propagation | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | Vlasov plasma model | Vlasov plasma model | electron plasma waves | electron plasma waves | Landau damping | Landau damping | ion-acoustic waves | ion-acoustic waves | streaming instabilities | streaming instabilities | fourth state of matter | fourth state of matter | plasma state | plasma state | visible universe | visible universe | economics | economics | plasmas | plasmas | motion of charged particles | motion of charged particles | two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | Debye Shielding | Debye Shielding | collective effects | collective effects | charged particle motion | charged particle motion | EM Fields | EM Fields | cross-sections | cross-sections | relaxation | relaxation | fluid plasma descriptions | fluid plasma descriptions | MHD equilibrium | MHD equilibrium | MHD dynamics | MHD dynamics | dynamics in two-fluid plasmas | dynamics in two-fluid plasmas | cold plasma waves | cold plasma waves | magnetic field | magnetic field | microscopic to fluid plasma descriptions | microscopic to fluid plasma descriptions | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory.linear Landau growth | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory.linear Landau growth | kinetic description of waves | kinetic description of waves | instabilities | instabilities | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory | linear Landau growth | linear Landau growth | 22.611 | 22.611 | 6.651 | 6.651 | 8.613 | 8.613

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8.01 Physics I (MIT)

Description

Physics I is a first-year physics course which introduces students to classical mechanics. Topics include: space and time; straight-line kinematics; motion in a plane; forces and equilibrium; experimental basis of Newton's laws; particle dynamics; universal gravitation; collisions and conservation laws; work and potential energy; vibrational motion; conservative forces; inertial forces and non-inertial frames; central force motions; rigid bodies and rotational dynamics.

Subjects

classical mechanics | Space and time | straight-line kinematics | motion in a plane | experimental basis of Newton's laws | particle dynamics | universal gravitation | collisions and conservation laws | work and potential energy | vibrational motion | conservative forces | central force motions | inertial forces and non-inertial frames | rigid bodies and rotational dynamics | forces and equilibrium | space | time | space-time | planar motion | forces | equilibrium | Newton?s laws | collisions | conservation laws | work | potential energy | inertial forces | non-inertial forces | rigid bodies | rotational dynamics

License

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6.837 Computer Graphics (MIT) 6.837 Computer Graphics (MIT)

Description

This course provides introduction to computer graphics algorithms, software and hardware. Topics include: ray tracing, the graphics pipeline, transformations, texture mapping, shadows, sampling, global illumination, splines, animation and color. This course offers 6 Engineering Design Points in MIT's EECS program. This course provides introduction to computer graphics algorithms, software and hardware. Topics include: ray tracing, the graphics pipeline, transformations, texture mapping, shadows, sampling, global illumination, splines, animation and color. This course offers 6 Engineering Design Points in MIT's EECS program.

Subjects

animation and color | animation and color | modeling | modeling | transformations | transformations | Bezier curves and splines | Bezier curves and splines | representation and interpolation of rotations | representation and interpolation of rotations | computer animation | computer animation | particle systems | particle systems | collision detection | collision detection | ray tracing and casting | ray tracing and casting | rasterization and shading texture mapping | rasterization and shading texture mapping | graphics pipeline | graphics pipeline | global illumination | global illumination | antialiasing | antialiasing | sampling | sampling

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16.55 Ionized Gases (MIT) 16.55 Ionized Gases (MIT)

Description

This course highlights the properties and behavior of low-temperature plasmas in relation to energy conversion, plasma propulsion, and gas lasers. The course includes material on the equilibrium (energy states, statistical mechanics, and relationship to thermodynamics) and kinetic theory of ionized gases (motion of charged particles, distribution function, collisions, characteristic lengths and times, cross sections, and transport properties). In addition, the course discusses gas surface interactions (thermionic emission, sheaths, and probe theory) and radiation in plasmas and diagnostics. This course highlights the properties and behavior of low-temperature plasmas in relation to energy conversion, plasma propulsion, and gas lasers. The course includes material on the equilibrium (energy states, statistical mechanics, and relationship to thermodynamics) and kinetic theory of ionized gases (motion of charged particles, distribution function, collisions, characteristic lengths and times, cross sections, and transport properties). In addition, the course discusses gas surface interactions (thermionic emission, sheaths, and probe theory) and radiation in plasmas and diagnostics.

Subjects

Ionized gases | Ionized gases | plasma physics | plasma physics | motion of charges | motion of charges | drift | drift | adiabatic invariants | adiabatic invariants | collision theory | collision theory | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | H theorem | H theorem | entropy | entropy | Maxwellian distribution | Maxwellian distribution | Boltzmann equation | Boltzmann equation | plasma sheath | plasma sheath | electrostatic probe | electrostatic probe | orbital motion limit | orbital motion limit | equilibrium statistical mechanics | equilibrium statistical mechanics | radiation transport | radiation transport

License

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