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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT) 6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment. 6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | network | computer security | computer security | security | security | cryptography | cryptography | secret-key | secret-key | public-key | public-key | digital signature | digital signature | authentication | authentication | identification | identification | intrusion detection | intrusion detection | virus | virus | operating system | operating system | software | software | protection | protection | electronic mail | electronic mail | email | email | electronic commerce | electronic commerce | electronic cash | electronic cash | firewall | firewall | computer | computer | digital | digital | signature | signature | electronic | electronic | cash | cash | commerce | commerce | mail | mail | operating | operating | system | system | intrustion | intrustion | detection | detection | distributed | distributed | physical | physical | discretionary | discretionary | mandatory | mandatory | access | access | control | control | biometrics | biometrics | information | information | flow | flow | models | models | covert | covert | channels | channels | integrity | integrity | logic | logic | voting | voting | risk | risk | assessment | assessment | secure | secure | web | web | browsers | browsers | architecture | architecture | engineering | engineering | certificates | certificates | multi-user computer systems | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | physical security | discretionary access control | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | information-flow models | covert channels | covert channels | integrity models | integrity models | elementary cryptography | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | viruses | firewalls | firewalls | electronic voting | electronic voting | risk assessment | risk assessment | secure web browsers | secure web browsers | network security | network security | architecture engineering | architecture engineering | digital signatures | digital signatures | authentication schemes | authentication schemes | identification schemes | identification schemes | formal models | formal models | secure operating systems | secure operating systems | software protection | software protection | electronic mail security | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | World Wide Web | ecommerce | ecommerce | email security | email security | www | www | payment protocols | payment protocols | authentication logic | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introduction to ecommerce

Description

A general introduction to ecommerce covering the principles, requirements and problems associated with on-line commerce.

Subjects

commerce | electronic commerce | online commerce | buying | business | Information Technology And Information | Business and Administrative studies | Learning | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL04 = SCQF 4 | Foundational Level | NICAT 1 | CQFW 1 | Foundation | GCSE D-G | NVQ 1 | Intermediate 1 | | UK EL05 = SCQF 5 | Intermediate level | Intermediate | NICAT 2 | CQFW 2 | Intermediate | GSCE A-C | NVQ 2 | | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Secure Electronic Commerce Secure Electronic Commerce

Description

In this course we will study the threats and vulnerabilities in electronic commerce. Also, the security measures and mechanisms which are applicable in electronic commerce will be analyzed. In this course we will study the threats and vulnerabilities in electronic commerce. Also, the security measures and mechanisms which are applicable in electronic commerce will be analyzed.

Subjects

ón e Inteligencia Artificial | ón e Inteligencia Artificial | SET | SET | SSL/TLS | SSL/TLS | ía en Informática | ía en Informática | Digital certificates | Digital certificates | PKIs and TTPs | PKIs and TTPs | computer security | computer security | secure electronic commerce | secure electronic commerce | communications security | communications security | 2010 | 2010

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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15.810 Introduction to Marketing (MIT) 15.810 Introduction to Marketing (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the theory and application of marketing. Marketing topics covered include Customer needs, Company skills, Competition, Collaborators, and Context in marketing and product development (5C's). The course combines cases, discussions, and readings to provide a mix of integrating concepts and hands-on problem solving. This course is an introduction to the theory and application of marketing. Marketing topics covered include Customer needs, Company skills, Competition, Collaborators, and Context in marketing and product development (5C's). The course combines cases, discussions, and readings to provide a mix of integrating concepts and hands-on problem solving.

Subjects

marketing ideas | marketing ideas | product strategy | product strategy | advertising | advertising | communications | promotion | distribution | communications | promotion | distribution | price | price | pricing | pricing | customer needs | customer needs | company skills | company skills | competition | competition | collaborators | collaborators | context in marketing and product development | context in marketing and product development | 5C's | 5C's | financial services | financial services | consumer products | consumer products | software | software | auto-mobiles | auto-mobiles | airline services | airline services | not-for-profit eye clinics | not-for-profit eye clinics | e-commerce | e-commerce | MARKETING | MARKETING | PRODUCT STRATEGY | PRODUCT STRATEGY | ADVERTISING | ADVERTISING | COMMUNICATIONS | COMMUNICATIONS | PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT | PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT | Marketing | Marketing | Product Strategy | Product Strategy | Advertising | Advertising | Communications | Communications | Product Development | Product Development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.810 Introduction to Marketing (MIT) 15.810 Introduction to Marketing (MIT)

Description

This course explores theory and practice that draws on Customer needs, Company skills, Competition, Collaborators, and Context in marketing and product development (5C's). The course combines cases, discussions, and readings to provide a mix of integrating concepts and hands-on problem solving. A variety of perspectives on marketing issues are encouraged. This course explores theory and practice that draws on Customer needs, Company skills, Competition, Collaborators, and Context in marketing and product development (5C's). The course combines cases, discussions, and readings to provide a mix of integrating concepts and hands-on problem solving. A variety of perspectives on marketing issues are encouraged.

Subjects

marketing ideas | marketing ideas | product strategy | product strategy | advertising | advertising | communications | promotion | distribution | communications | promotion | distribution | price | price | pricing | pricing | customer needs | customer needs | company skills | company skills | competition | competition | collaborators | collaborators | context in marketing and product development | context in marketing and product development | 5C's | 5C's | financial services | financial services | consumer products | consumer products | software | software | auto-mobiles | auto-mobiles | airline services | airline services | not-for-profit eye clinics | not-for-profit eye clinics | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT) 21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT)

Description

Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan. Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan.

Subjects

World Trade Center | World Trade Center | September 11 | September 11 | memorial | memorial | discourse | discourse | media | media | art | art | collective memory | collective memory | Germany | Germany | Japan | Japan | global commerce | global commerce | transportation | transportation | systems | systems | surveillance | surveillance | non-Western cultures | non-Western cultures | oppositional political formations | oppositional political formations | Robert Musil | Robert Musil | Maurice Halbwachs | Maurice Halbwachs | Shusaku Arakawa | Shusaku Arakawa | Michael Hogan | Michael Hogan | Ariella Azoulay | Ariella Azoulay | Chomsky | Chomsky | Freud | Freud | Edward Said | Edward Said

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.053 Introduction to Optimization (MIT) 15.053 Introduction to Optimization (MIT)

Description

15.053 is an undergraduate subject in the theory and practice of optimization. We will consider optimization models with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, E-business, project management, finance as well as several other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of optimization as well as heuristics, and we will present algorithms and theory for linear programming, dynamic programming, integer programming, and non-linear programming.One way of summarizing a subject is a lecture by lecture description of the subject, or a description of the methodologies presented in the subject. We do list a lecture by lecture description, but first we describe several cross cutting themes. 15.053 is an undergraduate subject in the theory and practice of optimization. We will consider optimization models with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, E-business, project management, finance as well as several other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of optimization as well as heuristics, and we will present algorithms and theory for linear programming, dynamic programming, integer programming, and non-linear programming.One way of summarizing a subject is a lecture by lecture description of the subject, or a description of the methodologies presented in the subject. We do list a lecture by lecture description, but first we describe several cross cutting themes.

Subjects

finance | finance | project management | project management | E-commerce | E-commerce | heuristics | heuristics | non-linear programming | non-linear programming | integer programming | integer programming | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | network optimization | network optimization | linear programming | linear programming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.566 Information Technology as an Integrating Force in Manufacturing (MIT) 15.566 Information Technology as an Integrating Force in Manufacturing (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. In virtually every industry and every firm, information technology is driving change, creating opportunities and challenges. Leaders who don't understand at least the fundamentals of information systems will be at a strategic disadvantage. This course provides broad coverage of technology concepts and trends underlying current and future developments in information technology, and fundamental principles for the effective use of computer-based information systems. There will be a special emphasis on manufacturing. Information Systems topics that will be covered include networks and distributed computing, including the World Wide Web, hardware and operating systems, software development tools and processes, relational databases, security a Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. In virtually every industry and every firm, information technology is driving change, creating opportunities and challenges. Leaders who don't understand at least the fundamentals of information systems will be at a strategic disadvantage. This course provides broad coverage of technology concepts and trends underlying current and future developments in information technology, and fundamental principles for the effective use of computer-based information systems. There will be a special emphasis on manufacturing. Information Systems topics that will be covered include networks and distributed computing, including the World Wide Web, hardware and operating systems, software development tools and processes, relational databases, security a

Subjects

information technology | information technology | business | business | manufacturing | manufacturing | strategy | strategy | information systems | information systems | networks | networks | distributed computing | distributed computing | software development | software development | web | web | enterprise application | enterprise application | security | security | database | database | operating system | operating system | electronic commerce | electronic commerce | business to business | business to business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.464 E-Commerce and the Internet in Real Estate and Construction (MIT) 1.464 E-Commerce and the Internet in Real Estate and Construction (MIT)

Description

1.464 examines the long term effects of information technology on business strategy in the real estate and construction industry. Considerations include: supply chain, allocation of risk, impact on contract obligations and security, trends toward consolidation, and the convergence of information transparency and personal effectiveness. Resources are drawn from the world of dot.com entrepreneurship and "old economy" responses. 1.464 examines the long term effects of information technology on business strategy in the real estate and construction industry. Considerations include: supply chain, allocation of risk, impact on contract obligations and security, trends toward consolidation, and the convergence of information transparency and personal effectiveness. Resources are drawn from the world of dot.com entrepreneurship and "old economy" responses.

Subjects

e-commerce | e-commerce | Internet | Internet | real estate | real estate | construction | construction | information technology | information technology | business strategy | business strategy | supply chain | supply chain | risk allocation | risk allocation | contract obligations | contract obligations | consolidation | consolidation | information transparency | information transparency | case method | case method | case study | case study | industry value system | industry value system | optimization | optimization | business models | business models | incentives | incentives | game theory | game theory | strategic managment | strategic managment | knowledge management | knowledge management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.840 Special Seminar in Marketing: Marketing Management (MIT) 15.840 Special Seminar in Marketing: Marketing Management (MIT)

Description

The purpose of 15.840 is to: Introduce key marketing ideas and phenomena. Develop students' skills in marketing analysis and planning. Provide a forum (both written and oral) for presenting and defending recommendations and critically examining and discussing those of others. An emphasis is placed on theory and practice that draws on market research, competitive analysis, and marketing science. The purpose of 15.840 is to: Introduce key marketing ideas and phenomena. Develop students' skills in marketing analysis and planning. Provide a forum (both written and oral) for presenting and defending recommendations and critically examining and discussing those of others. An emphasis is placed on theory and practice that draws on market research, competitive analysis, and marketing science.

Subjects

marketing management | marketing management | marketing analysis | marketing analysis | market research | market research | competitive analysis | competitive analysis | marketing science | marketing science | creating consumer value | creating consumer value | indentifying customer needs | indentifying customer needs | understand purchasing process | understand purchasing process | forming target segments | forming target segments | product positioning | product positioning | advertising | advertising | advertisements | advertisements | product distribution | product distribution | e-commerce | e-commerce | customer lifetime value | customer lifetime value | pricing | pricing | diffusion | diffusion | customer satisfaction | customer satisfaction | product life cyclce | product life cyclce | branding | branding | brands | brands | product life cycle | product life cycle

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.062 Data Mining (MIT) 15.062 Data Mining (MIT)

Description

Data that has relevance for managerial decisions is accumulating at an incredible rate due to a host of technological advances. Electronic data capture has become inexpensive and ubiquitous as a by-product of innovations such as the internet, e-commerce, electronic banking, point-of-sale devices, bar-code readers, and intelligent machines. Such data is often stored in data warehouses and data marts specifically intended for management decision support. Data mining is a rapidly growing field that is concerned with developing techniques to assist managers to make intelligent use of these repositories. A number of successful applications have been reported in areas such as credit rating, fraud detection, database marketing, customer relationship management, and stock market investments. The f Data that has relevance for managerial decisions is accumulating at an incredible rate due to a host of technological advances. Electronic data capture has become inexpensive and ubiquitous as a by-product of innovations such as the internet, e-commerce, electronic banking, point-of-sale devices, bar-code readers, and intelligent machines. Such data is often stored in data warehouses and data marts specifically intended for management decision support. Data mining is a rapidly growing field that is concerned with developing techniques to assist managers to make intelligent use of these repositories. A number of successful applications have been reported in areas such as credit rating, fraud detection, database marketing, customer relationship management, and stock market investments. The f

Subjects

data warehouses | data warehouses | internet | internet | e-commerce | e-commerce | electronic banking | electronic banking | point-of-sale devices | point-of-sale devices | bar-code readers | bar-code readers | intelligent machines | intelligent machines

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.020 Competition in Telecommunications (MIT) 15.020 Competition in Telecommunications (MIT)

Description

Competition in Telecommunications provides an introduction to the economics, business strategies, and technology of telecommunications markets. This includes markets for wireless communications, local and long-distance services, and customer equipment. The convergence of computers, cable TV and telecommunications and the competitive emergence of the Internet are covered in depth. A number of speakers from leading companies in the industry will give course lectures. Competition in Telecommunications provides an introduction to the economics, business strategies, and technology of telecommunications markets. This includes markets for wireless communications, local and long-distance services, and customer equipment. The convergence of computers, cable TV and telecommunications and the competitive emergence of the Internet are covered in depth. A number of speakers from leading companies in the industry will give course lectures.

Subjects

telephone | telephone | Internet | Internet | communications | communications | economics | economics | business strategy | business strategy | technologies | technologies | wireless | wireless | convergence | convergence | cable television | cable television | governmental regulations | governmental regulations | public policy | public policy | evolution of technology | evolution of technology | computer hardware and software | computer hardware and software | VoIP | VoIP | data and voice traffic | data and voice traffic | network integration | network integration | deregulation | deregulation | cell phones | cell phones | WiFi | WiFi | Internet commerce | Internet commerce | spectrum auctions | spectrum auctions | telecommunications markets | telecommunications markets | competition | competition | wireless communications | wireless communications | long-distance services | long-distance services | computers | computers | satellite TV | satellite TV | telecommunications industry | telecommunications industry | regulation | regulation | technology | technology | market structures | market structures | data traffic | data traffic | voice traffic | voice traffic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance. This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | advertising | advertising | status | status | American Dream | American Dream | mass-market | mass-market | suburbs | suburbs | e-commerce | e-commerce | fast food | fast food

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ESD.57 Technology-based Business Transformation (MIT) ESD.57 Technology-based Business Transformation (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course covers how to leverage major technology advances to significantly transform a business in the marketplace. There is a focus on major issues a business must deal with to transform its technical and market strategies successfully, including the organizational and cultural aspects that often cause such business transformations to fail. Class material draws from concrete experiences of IBM's major transformation in the late 1990s, when it aggressively embraced the Internet and came up with its e-business strategy. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course covers how to leverage major technology advances to significantly transform a business in the marketplace. There is a focus on major issues a business must deal with to transform its technical and market strategies successfully, including the organizational and cultural aspects that often cause such business transformations to fail. Class material draws from concrete experiences of IBM's major transformation in the late 1990s, when it aggressively embraced the Internet and came up with its e-business strategy.

Subjects

innovation | innovation | technology | technology | strategy | strategy | business strategy | business strategy | end-user | end-user | market | market | leadership | leadership | organization | organization | disruptive technology | disruptive technology | e-business | e-business | e-commerce | e-commerce | IBM | IBM | 1990s | 1990s | innovator's dilemna | innovator's dilemna | competitiveness | competitiveness | outsourcing | outsourcing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance. This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | advertising | advertising | status | status | American Dream | American Dream | mass-market | mass-market | suburbs | suburbs | e-commerce | e-commerce | fast food | fast food

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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