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4.696 A Global History of Architecture Writing Seminar (MIT) 4.696 A Global History of Architecture Writing Seminar (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course will study the question of Global Architecture from the point of view of producing a set of lectures on that subject. The course will be run in the form of a writing seminar, except that students will be asked to prepare for the final class an hour-long lecture for an undergraduate survey course. During the semester, students will study the debates about where to locate "the global" and do some comparative analysis of various textbooks. The topic of the final lecture will be worked on during the semester. For that lecture, students will be asked to identify the themes of the survey course, and hand in the bibliography and reading list for their lecture. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course will study the question of Global Architecture from the point of view of producing a set of lectures on that subject. The course will be run in the form of a writing seminar, except that students will be asked to prepare for the final class an hour-long lecture for an undergraduate survey course. During the semester, students will study the debates about where to locate "the global" and do some comparative analysis of various textbooks. The topic of the final lecture will be worked on during the semester. For that lecture, students will be asked to identify the themes of the survey course, and hand in the bibliography and reading list for their lecture.

Subjects

global architectures | global architectures | survey course | survey course | the global | the global | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | researching history | researching history | global perspective | global perspective | architectural history | architectural history | comparative globality | comparative globality | art history | art history | eurocentrism | eurocentrism | ethnocentrism | ethnocentrism | mark kurlansky | mark kurlansky | salt a world history | salt a world history | jared diamond | jared diamond | collapse | collapse | how societies choose to fail or succeed | how societies choose to fail or succeed

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century. This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century.

Subjects

historical writing | historical writing | politics | politics | social | social | culture | culture | demographics | demographics | biography | biography | environment | environment | comparative literature | comparative literature | film | film | fiction | fiction | memoir | memoir | methodology | methodology | political | political | cultural | cultural | demographic | demographic | biographical | biographical | comparative | comparative | historical films | historical films | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | methods | methods | historians | historians | interpretation | interpretation | archives | archives | archivists | archivists | archival findings | archival findings | history | history | national identity | national identity | philosophy of history | philosophy of history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT) 17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics. This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics.

Subjects

security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security | security | sustainability | sustainability | international relations | international relations | comparative approaches | comparative approaches | constraints | constraints | options | options | strategies | strategies | policy choice | policy choice | developing and industrial nations | developing and industrial nations | decision | decision | trade-offs | trade-offs | inter-temporal effects | inter-temporal effects | technology | technology | design systems | design systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students. This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | comparative politics | Aristotle | Aristotle | political research | political research | regimes | regimes | Marxist model | Marxist model | class alliances | class alliances | democracy | democracy | pluralism | pluralism | economic growth | economic growth | party formation | party formation | political elites | political elites | interest groups | interest groups | constitutional reform | constitutional reform | political system | political system | constitutional choice | constitutional choice | leadership | leadership | state formation | state formation | modernization | modernization | political institution | political institution | embedded autonomy | embedded autonomy | dead capital | dead capital | nationalism | nationalism | electoral behavior | electoral behavior | clientelism | clientelism | patronage politics | patronage politics | corruption | corruption | self-government | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics.

Subjects

security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security | sustainability | international relations | comparative approaches | constraints | options | strategies | policy choice | developing and industrial nations | decision | trade-offs | inter-temporal effects | technology | design systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century.

Subjects

historical writing | politics | social | culture | demographics | biography | environment | comparative literature | film | fiction | memoir | methodology | political | cultural | demographic | biographical | comparative | historical films | memoirs | conventional history | methods | historians | interpretation | archives | archivists | archival findings | history | national identity | philosophy of history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT) 14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course discusses decision theory and topics in game theory. We present models of individual decision-making under certainty and uncertainty. Topics include preference orderings, expected utility, risk, stochastic dominance, supermodularity, monotone comparative statics, background risk, game theory, rationalizability, iterated strict dominance multi-stage games, sequential equilibrium, trembling-hand perfection, stability, signaling games, theory of auctions, global games, repeated games, and correlation. This half-semester course discusses decision theory and topics in game theory. We present models of individual decision-making under certainty and uncertainty. Topics include preference orderings, expected utility, risk, stochastic dominance, supermodularity, monotone comparative statics, background risk, game theory, rationalizability, iterated strict dominance multi-stage games, sequential equilibrium, trembling-hand perfection, stability, signaling games, theory of auctions, global games, repeated games, and correlation.

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | preference | preference | utility representation | utility representation | expected utility | expected utility | positive interpretation | positive interpretation | normative interpretation | normative interpretation | risk | risk | stochastic dominance | stochastic dominance | insurance | insurance | finance | finance | supermodularity | supermodularity | comparative statics | comparative statics | decision theory | decision theory | game theory | game theory | rationalizability | rationalizability | iterated strict dominance | iterated strict dominance | iterated conditional dominance | iterated conditional dominance | bargaining | bargaining | equilibrium | equilibrium | sequential equilibrium | sequential equilibrium | trembling-hand perfection | trembling-hand perfection | signaling games | signaling games | auctions | auctions | global games | global games | repeated games | repeated games | correlation | correlation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.696 A Global History of Architecture Writing Seminar (MIT)

Description

This course will study the question of Global Architecture from the point of view of producing a set of lectures on that subject. The course will be run in the form of a writing seminar, except that students will be asked to prepare for the final class an hour-long lecture for an undergraduate survey course. During the semester, students will study the debates about where to locate "the global" and do some comparative analysis of various textbooks. The topic of the final lecture will be worked on during the semester. For that lecture, students will be asked to identify the themes of the survey course, and hand in the bibliography and reading list for their lecture.

Subjects

global architectures | survey course | the global | comparative analysis | researching history | global perspective | architectural history | comparative globality | art history | eurocentrism | ethnocentrism | mark kurlansky | salt a world history | jared diamond | collapse | how societies choose to fail or succeed

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies? This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies?

Subjects

history | history | methodology | methodology | historian | historian | analysis | analysis | oral history | oral history | comparative history | comparative history | memory | memory | narrative | narrative | language | language | sources | sources | methods | methods | organization | organization | framing | framing | and style | and style | historical writing | historical writing | political history | political history | social history | social history | cultural history | cultural history | demographics | demographics | biographical writing | biographical writing | biography | biography | auto-biography | auto-biography | historical films | historical films | fiction | fiction | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | approach | approach | style | style | evidence | evidence | methodologies | methodologies | historical accounts | historical accounts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.166 Law, Social Movements, and Public Policy: Comparative and International Experience (MIT) 11.166 Law, Social Movements, and Public Policy: Comparative and International Experience (MIT)

Description

This course studies the interaction between law, courts, and social movements in shaping domestic and global public policy. Examines how groups mobilize to use law to affect change and why they succeed and fail. The class uses case studies to explore the interplay between law, social movements, and public policy in current areas such as gender, race, labor, trade, environment, and human rights. Finally, it introduces the theories of public policy, social movements, law and society, and transnational studies. This course studies the interaction between law, courts, and social movements in shaping domestic and global public policy. Examines how groups mobilize to use law to affect change and why they succeed and fail. The class uses case studies to explore the interplay between law, social movements, and public policy in current areas such as gender, race, labor, trade, environment, and human rights. Finally, it introduces the theories of public policy, social movements, law and society, and transnational studies.

Subjects

law | law | social movements | social movements | public policy | public policy | comparative | comparative | international | international | Occupy Wall Street | Occupy Wall Street | gender | gender | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | social justice | social justice | human rights | human rights | feminism | feminism | women's rights | women's rights | India | India | United States | United States | labor | labor | economics | economics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures. This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social movements | social movements | comparative | comparative | collective action | collective action | twentieth century | twentieth century | United States | United States | civil rights | civil rights | unemployed workers | unemployed workers | welfare rights | welfare rights | pro-choice | pro-choice | pro-life | pro-life | gay rights | gay rights | success | success | failures. | failures.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory and is the first course in the microeconomic theory series. It is intended for graduate students in the economics program. Some components of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know while others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics of recent interest will also be covered and may include: theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty); markets and competition; tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. This course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory and is the first course in the microeconomic theory series. It is intended for graduate students in the economics program. Some components of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know while others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics of recent interest will also be covered and may include: theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty); markets and competition; tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty) | theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty) | markets and competition | markets and competition | tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory | tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.260 Topics in Philosophy: David Lewis (MIT) 24.260 Topics in Philosophy: David Lewis (MIT)

Description

The class will be devoted to the work of David Lewis, one of the most exciting and influential philosophers of the late twentieth century. We will have seminar-style discussions about his work on counterfactuals, time, causation, probability, and decision-theory. The class will be devoted to the work of David Lewis, one of the most exciting and influential philosophers of the late twentieth century. We will have seminar-style discussions about his work on counterfactuals, time, causation, probability, and decision-theory.

Subjects

counterfactuals | counterfactuals | comparative possibility | comparative possibility | counterfactual dependence | counterfactual dependence | time | time | causation | causation | causal explanation | causal explanation | probability | probability | subjectivity | subjectivity | objectivity | objectivity | chance | chance | Hume | Hume | supervenience | supervenience | decision theory | decision theory | Prisoners? Dilemma | Prisoners? Dilemma | Newcomb problem | Newcomb problem | free will | free will | determinism | determinism | plurality of worlds | plurality of worlds | possible worlds | possible worlds | time travel | time travel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.14 Brain Structure and its Origins (MIT) 9.14 Brain Structure and its Origins (MIT)

Description

This course covers major CNS structures with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include basic patterns of connections in CNS, embryogenesis, PNS anatomy and development, process outgrowth and synaptogenesis, growth factors and cell survival, spinal and hindbrain anatomy, and development of regional specificity with an introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution. A review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture) is also covered as well as the trigeminal system, retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration, neocortex anatomy and development, the olfactory system, corpus striatum, brain transplants, the limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity. This course covers major CNS structures with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include basic patterns of connections in CNS, embryogenesis, PNS anatomy and development, process outgrowth and synaptogenesis, growth factors and cell survival, spinal and hindbrain anatomy, and development of regional specificity with an introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution. A review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture) is also covered as well as the trigeminal system, retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration, neocortex anatomy and development, the olfactory system, corpus striatum, brain transplants, the limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.

Subjects

CNS structures | CNS structures | development | development | plasticity | plasticity | anatomy | anatomy | tissue culture | tissue culture | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | synaptogenesis | growth factors | growth factors | cell survival | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | olfactory system | corpus striatum | corpus striatum | brain transplants | brain transplants | limbic system | limbic system | Development | Development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.010 Computational Methods of Scientific Programming (MIT) 12.010 Computational Methods of Scientific Programming (MIT)

Description

This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB, and Mathematica. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages. This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB, and Mathematica. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages.

Subjects

programming languages | programming languages | techniques used by physical scientists | techniques used by physical scientists | FORTRAN | FORTRAN | C | C | C++ | C++ | Matlab | Matlab | Mathematica | Mathematica | program design | program design | algorithm development and verification | algorithm development and verification | comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages | comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages | examination of data with visualization techniques | examination of data with visualization techniques | numerical analysis | numerical analysis | methods of dissemination and verification | methods of dissemination and verification

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT) 17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e

Subjects

Health care | Health care | policy | policy | United States | United States | medical services | medical services | health care costs | health care costs | markets | markets | regulatory policy | regulatory policy | Canada | Canada | Great Britian | Great Britian | Japan | Japan | Germany | Germany | technology | technology | decentralization | decentralization | health risks | health risks | comparative prospectives | comparative prospectives | access | access | reform | reform | political | political | organizational | organizational | factors | factors

License

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11.941 Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities (MIT) 11.941 Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities (MIT)

Description

The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discussions to assist students in becoming mindful of the potential and pitfalls of comparative analysis, the types of data, the methods of analysis, and the urban issues or sectors which may benefit the most from such approaches. The course is designed to be interdisciplinary and interactive, and The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discussions to assist students in becoming mindful of the potential and pitfalls of comparative analysis, the types of data, the methods of analysis, and the urban issues or sectors which may benefit the most from such approaches. The course is designed to be interdisciplinary and interactive, and

Subjects

urban studies | urban studies | first third | first third | world | world | comparison | comparison | city | city | globalization | globalization | multicultural | multicultural | qualitative methods | qualitative methods | quantitative methods | quantitative methods | cultural analysis | cultural analysis | urban | urban | comparative case studies | comparative case studies | policy | policy

License

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Development of the Mammalian Brain (MIT) Development of the Mammalian Brain (MIT)

Description

Lectures plus guided readings and discussion with project reports, covering major CNS structures, with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include: basic patterns of connections in CNS; review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture); embryogenesis; PNS anatomy and development; process outgrowth and synaptogenesis; growth factors and cell survival; spinal and hindbrain anatomy; development of regional specificity with introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution; trigeminal system; retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration; neocortex anatomy and development; olfactory system; corpus striatum; brain transplants; limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.Technical RequirementsMedia play Lectures plus guided readings and discussion with project reports, covering major CNS structures, with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include: basic patterns of connections in CNS; review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture); embryogenesis; PNS anatomy and development; process outgrowth and synaptogenesis; growth factors and cell survival; spinal and hindbrain anatomy; development of regional specificity with introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution; trigeminal system; retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration; neocortex anatomy and development; olfactory system; corpus striatum; brain transplants; limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.Technical RequirementsMedia play

Subjects

CNS structures | CNS structures | development | development | plasticity | plasticity | anatomy | anatomy | tissue culture | tissue culture | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | synaptogenesis | growth factors | growth factors | cell survival | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | olfactory system | corpus striatum | corpus striatum | brain transplants | brain transplants | limbic system | limbic system | Mammals -- Physiology | Mammals -- Physiology

License

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | 21st century | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | realism | realism | liberalism | liberalism | institutionalism | institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | conflict | conflict | war | war | globalization | globalization | critical analysis | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | analytical structures | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | contentions | environmentalism | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | warfare | transformations | transformations | structures | structures | processes | processes

License

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory | producer theory | partial equilibrium | partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | afriat's theorem | afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics

License

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11.027 City to City: Comparing, Researching and Writing about Cities (MIT) 11.027 City to City: Comparing, Researching and Writing about Cities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces undergraduate planning students to the role of the planner in researching issues in cities both in the United States and abroad. This course is a practical, hands-on workshop that challenges students to research, write and present their ideas on two different cities: A U.S. City (preferably somewhere close) and Copenhagen. Students will be equipped to: select and research a thesis topic, work professionally with faculty and other experts on the topic of their choice, and research, write and present. This course introduces undergraduate planning students to the role of the planner in researching issues in cities both in the United States and abroad. This course is a practical, hands-on workshop that challenges students to research, write and present their ideas on two different cities: A U.S. City (preferably somewhere close) and Copenhagen. Students will be equipped to: select and research a thesis topic, work professionally with faculty and other experts on the topic of their choice, and research, write and present.

Subjects

Copenhagen | Copenhagen | Denmark | Denmark | Boston | Boston | Massachusetts | Massachusetts | United States | United States | presentations | presentations | intereviews | intereviews | research | research | writing | writing | comparative research | comparative research | editing | editing | suburbs | suburbs | waterfront | waterfront | politics | politics | transportation | transportation | transit | transit | bicycles | bicycles | culture | culture | history | history

License

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International Relations (MIT) International Relations (MIT)

Description

This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior. This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior.

Subjects

globalization | globalization | migration | migration | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | environment | environment | public policy | public policy | transnational organization | transnational organization | sustainable development | sustainable development | global change | global change | government | government | technology | technology | security | security | civil society | civil society | political theory | political theory | theory | theory | policy | policy | emergent structures | emergent structures | processes | processes | flows | flows | goods | goods | services | services | national boundaries | national boundaries | international trade | international trade | immigration | immigration | international policies | international policies | macro-level | macro-level | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | comparative politics | comparative politics | integration | integration | national economies | national economies | IR | IR | IPE | IPE | sovereignty | sovereignty | inter-state relations | inter-state relations | supra-state | supra-state | non-state | non-state | narrow globalization | narrow globalization | comlex view | comlex view | international conflict | international conflict | domestic politics | domestic politics | international politics | international politics | population movements | population movements | macro-level behavior | macro-level behavior | complex view | complex view

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.047 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution (MIT) 6.047 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology, combining theory with practice. We study the principles of algorithm design for biological datasets, and analyze influential problems and techniques. We use these to analyze real datasets from large-scale studies in genomics and proteomics. The topics covered include: Genomes: biological sequence analysis, hidden Markov models, gene finding, RNA folding, sequence alignment, genome assembly Networks: gene expression analysis, regulatory motifs, graph algorithms, scale-free networks, network motifs, network evolution Evolution: comparative genomics, phylogenetics, genome duplication, genome rearrangements, evolutionary theory, rapid evolution This course focuses on the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology, combining theory with practice. We study the principles of algorithm design for biological datasets, and analyze influential problems and techniques. We use these to analyze real datasets from large-scale studies in genomics and proteomics. The topics covered include: Genomes: biological sequence analysis, hidden Markov models, gene finding, RNA folding, sequence alignment, genome assembly Networks: gene expression analysis, regulatory motifs, graph algorithms, scale-free networks, network motifs, network evolution Evolution: comparative genomics, phylogenetics, genome duplication, genome rearrangements, evolutionary theory, rapid evolution

Subjects

computational biology | computational biology | algorithms | algorithms | machine learning | machine learning | biology | biology | biological datasets | biological datasets | genomics | genomics | proteomics | proteomics | genomes | genomes | sequence analysis | sequence analysis | sequence alignment | sequence alignment | genome assembly | genome assembly | network motifs | network motifs | network evolution | network evolution | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | comparative genomics | comparative genomics | python | python | probability | probability | statistics | statistics | entropy | entropy | information | information

License

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