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6.632 Electromagnetic Wave Theory (MIT) 6.632 Electromagnetic Wave Theory (MIT)

Description

6.632 is a graduate subject on electromagnetic wave theory, emphasizing mathematical approaches, problem solving, and physical interpretation. Topics covered include: waves in media, equivalence principle, duality and complementarity, Huygens' principle, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, dyadic Green's functions, Lorentz transformation, and Maxwell-Minkowski theory. Examples deal with limiting cases of Maxwell's theory and diffraction and scattering of electromagnetic waves. 6.632 is a graduate subject on electromagnetic wave theory, emphasizing mathematical approaches, problem solving, and physical interpretation. Topics covered include: waves in media, equivalence principle, duality and complementarity, Huygens' principle, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, dyadic Green's functions, Lorentz transformation, and Maxwell-Minkowski theory. Examples deal with limiting cases of Maxwell's theory and diffraction and scattering of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetic wave theory | electromagnetic wave theory | waves in media | waves in media | equivalence principle | equivalence principle | duality | duality | complementarity | complementarity | Huygens' principle | Huygens' principle | Fresnel diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | dyadic Green's functions | dyadic Green's functions | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | Maxwell-Minkowski theory | Maxwell-Minkowski theory | Maxwell | Maxwell | diffraction | diffraction | scattering | scattering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT) 7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials. Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | nucleic acids | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | genetics | genetics | genes | genes | genetic material | genetic material | double helix | double helix | molecular biology | molecular biology | biotechnology | biotechnology | structure | structure | function | function | heredity | heredity | complementarity | complementarity | biological materials | biological materials | genetic code | genetic code | oligonucleotides | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | polyribosome | tRNA | tRNA | reverse transcription | reverse transcription | central dogma | central dogma | transcription | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.632 Electromagnetic Wave Theory (MIT)

Description

6.632 is a graduate subject on electromagnetic wave theory, emphasizing mathematical approaches, problem solving, and physical interpretation. Topics covered include: waves in media, equivalence principle, duality and complementarity, Huygens' principle, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, dyadic Green's functions, Lorentz transformation, and Maxwell-Minkowski theory. Examples deal with limiting cases of Maxwell's theory and diffraction and scattering of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetic wave theory | waves in media | equivalence principle | duality | complementarity | Huygens' principle | Fresnel diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | dyadic Green's functions | Lorentz transformation | Maxwell-Minkowski theory | Maxwell | diffraction | scattering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | DNA | RNA | genetics | genes | genetic material | double helix | molecular biology | biotechnology | structure | function | heredity | complementarity | biological materials | genetic code | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | tRNA | reverse transcription | central dogma | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.632 Electromagnetic Wave Theory (MIT)

Description

6.632 is a graduate subject on electromagnetic wave theory, emphasizing mathematical approaches, problem solving, and physical interpretation. Topics covered include: waves in media, equivalence principle, duality and complementarity, Huygens' principle, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, dyadic Green's functions, Lorentz transformation, and Maxwell-Minkowski theory. Examples deal with limiting cases of Maxwell's theory and diffraction and scattering of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetic wave theory | waves in media | equivalence principle | duality | complementarity | Huygens' principle | Fresnel diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | dyadic Green's functions | Lorentz transformation | Maxwell-Minkowski theory | Maxwell | diffraction | scattering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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