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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT) 15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed. Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | computers | future developments | future developments | networks | networks | distributed computing | distributed computing | programming languages | programming languages | firewall | firewall | e-business | e-business | computer architecture | computer architecture | operating | operating | software development | software development | database | database | user interface | user interface | telecommunication | telecommunication | data transmission | data transmission | local area network | local area network | wireless network | wireless network | internet | internet | world wide web | world wide web | digital security | digital security | architecture | architecture | data | data | transmission | transmission | wireless | wireless | interface | interface | user | user | software | software | development | development | programming | programming | languages | languages | distributed | distributed | computing | computing | LAN | LAN | local | local | area | area | future | future | digital | digital | security | security | technology | technology | information | information | management | management | systems | systems | relational | relational | graphical | graphical | interfaces | interfaces | client/server | client/server | enterprise | enterprise | applications | applications | cryptography | cryptography | services | services | Microsoft | Microsoft | Access | Access | Lotus Notes | Lotus Notes | processing | processing | memory | memory | I/O | I/O | CPU | CPU | OS | OS | hardware | hardware | compression | compression | SQL | SQL | queries | queries | design | design | WAN | WAN | wide | wide | Ethernet | Ethernet | packet-switched | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | peer-to-peer | WWW | WWW | public | public | key | key | mining | mining | warehousing | warehousing | concepts | concepts | conceptual | conceptual | modern computing | modern computing | information management | information management | operating systems | operating systems | relational database systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | client/server systems | enterprise applications | enterprise applications | web.internet services | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | Microsoft Access | database management systems | database management systems | information technology | information technology | telecommunications | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | eBusiness applications | client | client | servers | servers | wireless area network | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.961 Ambient Intelligence (MIT) MAS.961 Ambient Intelligence (MIT)

Description

This course will provide an overview of a new vision for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in which people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. It will focus on understanding enabling technologies and studying applications and experiments, and, to a lesser extent, it will address the socio-cultural impact. Students will read and discuss the most relevant articles in related areas: smart environments, smart networked objects, augmented and mixed realities, ubiquitous computing, pervasive computing, tangible computing, intelligent interfaces and wearable computing. Finally, they will be asked to come up with new ideas and start innovative projects in this area. This course will provide an overview of a new vision for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in which people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. It will focus on understanding enabling technologies and studying applications and experiments, and, to a lesser extent, it will address the socio-cultural impact. Students will read and discuss the most relevant articles in related areas: smart environments, smart networked objects, augmented and mixed realities, ubiquitous computing, pervasive computing, tangible computing, intelligent interfaces and wearable computing. Finally, they will be asked to come up with new ideas and start innovative projects in this area.

Subjects

HCI | HCI | smart environments | smart environments | smart networked objects | smart networked objects | augmented and mixed realities | augmented and mixed realities | ubiquitous computing | ubiquitous computing | pervasive computing | pervasive computing | tangible computing | tangible computing | intelligent interfaces | intelligent interfaces | wearable computing | wearable computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Ambient Intelligence (MIT) MAS.963 Ambient Intelligence (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on Ambient Intelligence, and how it envisions a world where people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. These interfaces recognize and respond to the presence and behavior of an individual in a personalized and relevant way. Students are required to do extensive literary research on the subject and participate in class discussions. This course focuses on Ambient Intelligence, and how it envisions a world where people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. These interfaces recognize and respond to the presence and behavior of an individual in a personalized and relevant way. Students are required to do extensive literary research on the subject and participate in class discussions.

Subjects

HCI | HCI | smart environments | smart environments | smart networked objects | smart networked objects | augmented and mixed realities | augmented and mixed realities | ubiquitous computing | ubiquitous computing | pervasive computing | pervasive computing | tangible computing | tangible computing | intelligent interfaces | intelligent interfaces | wearable computing | wearable computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.950J Engineering Biomedical Information: From Bioinformatics to Biosurveillance (MIT) HST.950J Engineering Biomedical Information: From Bioinformatics to Biosurveillance (MIT)

Description

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the technological advances in biomedical informatics and their applications at the intersection of computer science and biomedical research. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the technological advances in biomedical informatics and their applications at the intersection of computer science and biomedical research.

Subjects

biomedical informatics | biomedical informatics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | biomedical research | biomedical research | biological computing | biological computing | biomedical computing | biomedical computing | computational genomics | computational genomics | genomics | genomics | microarrays | microarrays | proteomics | proteomics | pharmacogenomics | pharmacogenomics | genomic privacy | genomic privacy | clinical informatics | clinical informatics | biosurveillance | biosurveillance | privacy | privacy | biotechnology | biotechnology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT) 18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.

Subjects

Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite differences | finite elements | finite elements | spectral method | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | Complex variables and applications | Complex variables and applications | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | linear programming | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite elements | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite elements | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | Optimization: network flows | linear programming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.349 Biological Computing: At the Crossroads of Engineering and Science (MIT) 7.349 Biological Computing: At the Crossroads of Engineering and Science (MIT)

Description

Imagine you are a salesman needing to visit 100 cities connected by a set of roads. Can you do it while stopping in each city only once? Even a supercomputer working at 1 trillion operations per second would take longer than the age of the universe to find a solution when considering each possibility in turn. In 1994, Leonard Adleman published a paper in which he described a solution, using the tools of molecular biology, for a smaller 7-city example of this problem. His paper generated enormous scientific and public interest, and kick-started the field of Biological Computing, the main subject of this discussion based seminar course. Students will analyze the Adleman paper, and the papers that preceded and followed it, with an eye for identifying the engineering and scientific aspects of Imagine you are a salesman needing to visit 100 cities connected by a set of roads. Can you do it while stopping in each city only once? Even a supercomputer working at 1 trillion operations per second would take longer than the age of the universe to find a solution when considering each possibility in turn. In 1994, Leonard Adleman published a paper in which he described a solution, using the tools of molecular biology, for a smaller 7-city example of this problem. His paper generated enormous scientific and public interest, and kick-started the field of Biological Computing, the main subject of this discussion based seminar course. Students will analyze the Adleman paper, and the papers that preceded and followed it, with an eye for identifying the engineering and scientific aspects of

Subjects

biological computing | biological computing | Leonard Adleman | Leonard Adleman | exquisite detection | exquisite detection | whole-cell computing | whole-cell computing | computation | computation | molecular biology | molecular biology | biotin-avidin | biotin-avidin | magnetic beads | magnetic beads | cellular processes | cellular processes | combinatorial problems | combinatorial problems | self-assembly | self-assembly | nanodevices | nanodevices | molecular machines | molecular machines | quorum sensing | quorum sensing | molecular switches | molecular switches | ciliates | ciliates | molecular gates | molecular gates | molecular circuits | molecular circuits | genetic switch | genetic switch | cellular networks | cellular networks | genetic networks | genetic networks | genetic circuits | genetic circuits

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | discrete | discrete | math | math | mathematics | mathematics | seminar | seminar | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral | oral | communication | communication | stable marriage | stable marriage | dych | dych | emergency | emergency | response vehicles | response vehicles | ambulance | ambulance | game theory | game theory | congruences | congruences | color theorem | color theorem | four color | four color | cake cutting | cake cutting | algorithm | algorithm | RSA | RSA | encryption | encryption | numberical integration | numberical integration | sorting | sorting | post correspondence problem | post correspondence problem | PCP | PCP | ramsey | ramsey | van der waals | van der waals | fibonacci | fibonacci | recursion | recursion | domino | domino | tiling | tiling | towers | towers | hanoi | hanoi | pigeonhole | pigeonhole | principle | principle | matrix | matrix | hamming | hamming | code | code | hat game | hat game | juggling | juggling | zero-knowledge | zero-knowledge | proof | proof | repeated games | repeated games | lewis carroll | lewis carroll | determinants | determinants | infinitude of primes | infinitude of primes | bridges | bridges | konigsberg | konigsberg | koenigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | time series analysis | GARCH | GARCH | rational | rational | recurrence | recurrence | relations | relations | digital | digital | image | image | compression | compression | quantum computing | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Ambient Intelligence (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on Ambient Intelligence, and how it envisions a world where people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. These interfaces recognize and respond to the presence and behavior of an individual in a personalized and relevant way. Students are required to do extensive literary research on the subject and participate in class discussions.

Subjects

HCI | smart environments | smart networked objects | augmented and mixed realities | ubiquitous computing | pervasive computing | tangible computing | intelligent interfaces | wearable computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT) STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists, This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | computers | history | history | digital | digital | scientific instrument | scientific instrument | applied science | applied science | meteorology | meteorology | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | logic | logic | mathematics | mathematics | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | biochemistry | aerospace | aerospace | medicine | medicine | supercomputing | supercomputing | distributed computing | distributed computing | linguistics | linguistics | humanities | humanities | hypertext | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | discrete | discrete | math | math | mathematics | mathematics | seminar | seminar | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral | oral | communication | communication | stable marriage | stable marriage | dych | dych | emergency | emergency | response vehicles | response vehicles | ambulance | ambulance | game theory | game theory | congruences | congruences | color theorem | color theorem | four color | four color | cake cutting | cake cutting | algorithm | algorithm | RSA | RSA | encryption | encryption | numberical integration | numberical integration | sorting | sorting | post correspondence problem | post correspondence problem | PCP | PCP | ramsey | ramsey | van der waals | van der waals | fibonacci | fibonacci | recursion | recursion | domino | domino | tiling | tiling | towers | towers | hanoi | hanoi | pigeonhole | pigeonhole | principle | principle | matrix | matrix | hamming | hamming | code | code | hat game | hat game | juggling | juggling | zero-knowledge | zero-knowledge | proof | proof | repeated games | repeated games | lewis carroll | lewis carroll | determinants | determinants | infinitude of primes | infinitude of primes | bridges | bridges | konigsberg | konigsberg | koenigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | time series analysis | GARCH | GARCH | rational | rational | recurrence | recurrence | relations | relations | digital | digital | image | image | compression | compression | quantum computing | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Ambient Intelligence (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on Ambient Intelligence, and how it envisions a world where people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. These interfaces recognize and respond to the presence and behavior of an individual in a personalized and relevant way. Students are required to do extensive literary research on the subject and participate in class discussions.

Subjects

HCI | smart environments | smart networked objects | augmented and mixed realities | ubiquitous computing | pervasive computing | tangible computing | intelligent interfaces | wearable computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.961 Ambient Intelligence (MIT)

Description

This course will provide an overview of a new vision for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in which people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. It will focus on understanding enabling technologies and studying applications and experiments, and, to a lesser extent, it will address the socio-cultural impact. Students will read and discuss the most relevant articles in related areas: smart environments, smart networked objects, augmented and mixed realities, ubiquitous computing, pervasive computing, tangible computing, intelligent interfaces and wearable computing. Finally, they will be asked to come up with new ideas and start innovative projects in this area.

Subjects

HCI | smart environments | smart networked objects | augmented and mixed realities | ubiquitous computing | pervasive computing | tangible computing | intelligent interfaces | wearable computing

License

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT) 6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university.  6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university. 

Subjects

information and entropy | information and entropy | computing | computing | communications | communications | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | digital signals and streams | codes | codes | compression | compression | noise | noise | probability | probability | reversible operations | reversible operations | irreversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | information in biological systems | channel capacity | channel capacity | aximum-entropy formalism | aximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | maximum-entropy formalism | maximum-entropy formalism | second law of thermodynamics | second law of thermodynamics | quantum computation | quantum computation | biological systems | biological systems | unified theory of information | unified theory of information | digital signals | digital signals | digital streams | digital streams | bits | bits | errors | errors | processes | processes | inference | inference | maximum entropy | maximum entropy | physical systems | physical systems | energy | energy | quantum information | quantum information | 6.050 | 6.050 | 2.110 | 2.110

License

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6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (SMA 5503) (MIT) 6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (SMA 5503) (MIT)

Description

This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5503 (Analysis and Design of Algorithms). This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5503 (Analysis and Design of Algorithms).

Subjects

algorithms | algorithms | efficient algorithms | efficient algorithms | sorting | sorting | search trees | search trees | heaps | heaps | hashing | hashing | divide-and-conquer | divide-and-conquer | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | amortized analysis | amortized analysis | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | shortest paths | shortest paths | network flow | network flow | computational geometry | computational geometry | number-theoretic algorithms | number-theoretic algorithms | polynomial and matrix calculations | polynomial and matrix calculations | caching | caching | parallel computing | parallel computing | SMA 5503 | SMA 5503 | 6.046 | 6.046

License

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6.763 Applied Superconductivity (MIT) 6.763 Applied Superconductivity (MIT)

Description

This course provides a phenomenological approach to superconductivity, with emphasis on superconducting electronics. Topics include: electrodynamics of superconductors, London's model, flux quantization, Josephson Junctions, superconducting quantum devices, equivalent circuits, high-speed superconducting electronics, and quantized circuits for quantum computing. The course also provides an overview of type II superconductors, critical magnetic fields, pinning, the critical state model, superconducting materials, and microscopic theory of superconductivity.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc. This course provides a phenomenological approach to superconductivity, with emphasis on superconducting electronics. Topics include: electrodynamics of superconductors, London's model, flux quantization, Josephson Junctions, superconducting quantum devices, equivalent circuits, high-speed superconducting electronics, and quantized circuits for quantum computing. The course also provides an overview of type II superconductors, critical magnetic fields, pinning, the critical state model, superconducting materials, and microscopic theory of superconductivity.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

applied superconductivity | applied superconductivity | superconducting electronics | superconducting electronics | electrodynamics of superconductors | electrodynamics of superconductors | London's model | London's model | flux quantization | flux quantization | Josephson Junctions | Josephson Junctions | superconducting quantum devices | superconducting quantum devices | equivalent circuits | equivalent circuits | high-speed superconducting electronics | high-speed superconducting electronics | quantized circuits | quantized circuits | quantum computing | quantum computing | type II superconductors | type II superconductors | critical magnetic fields | critical magnetic fields | pinning | pinning | the critical state model | the critical state model | superconducting materials | superconducting materials | microscopic theory of superconductivity | microscopic theory of superconductivity | Electric conductivity | Electric conductivity

License

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12.010 Computational Methods of Scientific Programming (MIT) 12.010 Computational Methods of Scientific Programming (MIT)

Description

This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB®, and Mathematica®. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages. Students first learn the basic usage of each language, common types of problems encountered, and techniques for solving a variety of problems encountered in contemporary research: examination of data with visualization techniques, numerical analysis, and methods of dissemination and verification. No prior programming experience is required.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .c and .f files found on this course site. C++ compiler is required to This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB®, and Mathematica®. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages. Students first learn the basic usage of each language, common types of problems encountered, and techniques for solving a variety of problems encountered in contemporary research: examination of data with visualization techniques, numerical analysis, and methods of dissemination and verification. No prior programming experience is required.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .c and .f files found on this course site. C++ compiler is required to

Subjects

programming languages | techniques used by physical scientists | programming languages | techniques used by physical scientists | FORTRAN | FORTRAN | C | C | C++ | C++ | Matlab | Matlab | Mathematica | Mathematica | program design | program design | algorithm development and verification | algorithm development and verification | comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages | comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages | examination of data with visualization techniques | examination of data with visualization techniques | numerical analysis | numerical analysis | methods of dissemination and verification | methods of dissemination and verification | algorithms | algorithms | formula | formula | formulae | formulae | computer programs | computer programs | graphics | graphics | computing languages | computing languages | structure | structure | documentation | documentation | program interface | program interface | syntax | syntax | advanced modeling | advanced modeling | simulation systems | simulation systems

License

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6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (MIT) 6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (MIT)

Description

This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing. This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing.

Subjects

algorithms | algorithms | efficient algorithms | efficient algorithms | sorting | sorting | search trees | search trees | heaps | heaps | hashing | hashing | divide-and-conquer | divide-and-conquer | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | amortized analysis | amortized analysis | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | shortest paths | shortest paths | network flow | network flow | computational geometry | computational geometry | number-theoretic algorithms | number-theoretic algorithms | polynomial and matrix calculations | polynomial and matrix calculations | caching | caching | parallel computing | parallel computing | 6.046 | 6.046 | 18.410 | 18.410

License

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13.002J Introduction to Numeric Analysis for Engineering (MIT) 13.002J Introduction to Numeric Analysis for Engineering (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the formulation, methodology, and techniques for numerical solution of engineering problems. Fundamental principles of digital computing and the implications for algorithm accuracy and stability. Error propagation and stability. The solution of systems of linear equations, including direct and iterative techniques. Roots of equations and systems of equations. Numerical interpolation, differentiation and integration. Fundamentals of finite-difference solutions to ordinary differential equations. Error and convergence analysis. Subject taught first half of term.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc. An introduction to the formulation, methodology, and techniques for numerical solution of engineering problems. Fundamental principles of digital computing and the implications for algorithm accuracy and stability. Error propagation and stability. The solution of systems of linear equations, including direct and iterative techniques. Roots of equations and systems of equations. Numerical interpolation, differentiation and integration. Fundamentals of finite-difference solutions to ordinary differential equations. Error and convergence analysis. Subject taught first half of term.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

digital computing | digital computing | algorithm accuracy | algorithm accuracy | error propagation | error propagation | linear equations | linear equations | iterative techniques | iterative techniques | roots of equations | roots of equations | systems of equations | systems of equations | numerical interpolation | numerical interpolation | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration | finite-difference solutions | finite-difference solutions | differential equations | differential equations | 10.002J | 10.002J | 13.002 | 13.002 | 10.002 | 10.002

License

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BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (MIT) BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (MIT)

Description

Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular design of new biological materials for nanotechnology, biocomputing and regenerative medicine. Graduate students are expected to complete additional coursework. Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular design of new biological materials for nanotechnology, biocomputing and regenerative medicine. Graduate students are expected to complete additional coursework.

Subjects

biological materials | biological materials | molecular structure | molecular structure | self assembly | self assembly | molecular design | molecular design | bioelectronics | bioelectronics | molecular computing | molecular computing | tissue engineering | tissue engineering

License

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18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT) 18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.

Subjects

Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite differences | finite elements | finite elements | spectral method | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | Complex variables and applications | Complex variables and applications | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | linear programming

License

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Student Innovation: Developing Mobile Apps for learning

Description

Helen Ginn, a Biochemistry undergraduate at Magdalen College, talks about how she developed a mobile app to serve a specific niche task. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

computing | biochemistry | App | programming | IT | mobile application | learning technologies | oxford | computing | biochemistry | App | programming | IT | mobile application | learning technologies | oxford | 2011-11-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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4.580 Inquiry into Computation and Design (MIT) 4.580 Inquiry into Computation and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject explores the varied nature and practice of computation in design. We will view computation and design broadly. Computation will include both work done on the computer (digital computing) and by-hand. Design will include both the process of making designs and artifacts, as well as the designs and artifacts themselves. The aim of the course is to develop a view of computation and design beyond the specifics of techniques and tools, and a critical, self-awareness of our own approaches and metaphors for computation and design. This subject explores the varied nature and practice of computation in design. We will view computation and design broadly. Computation will include both work done on the computer (digital computing) and by-hand. Design will include both the process of making designs and artifacts, as well as the designs and artifacts themselves. The aim of the course is to develop a view of computation and design beyond the specifics of techniques and tools, and a critical, self-awareness of our own approaches and metaphors for computation and design.

Subjects

design process | design process | human interaction | human interaction | representation | representation | intermediary objects | intermediary objects | expressive objects | expressive objects | shape grammars | shape grammars | design generatives | design generatives | object design | object design | design | design | computation | computation | generative algorithms | generative algorithms | digital computing | digital computing | design software. | design software.

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