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ón Global ón Global

Description

La asignatura se divide en tres partes. Una primera parte introductoria en la que se ofrece una panorámica de la información internacional con sus principales fuentes y los profesionales dedicados a ella, así como su reflejo en los medios a través de los diferentes géneros periodísticos. En la segunda parte se aborda y analiza la evolución de los conflictos desde el punto de vista de su cobertura mediática que ha conducido hacia un periodismo internacional acorde con la nueva era digital. En la tercera y última parte se examina el papel de otros actores internacionales en la información internacional, en especial dos organizaciones internacionales (Unión Europea y OTAN), así como el rol de las ONGS en informaciones internacionales con impacto global como las referidas al cambio La asignatura se divide en tres partes. Una primera parte introductoria en la que se ofrece una panorámica de la información internacional con sus principales fuentes y los profesionales dedicados a ella, así como su reflejo en los medios a través de los diferentes géneros periodísticos. En la segunda parte se aborda y analiza la evolución de los conflictos desde el punto de vista de su cobertura mediática que ha conducido hacia un periodismo internacional acorde con la nueva era digital. En la tercera y última parte se examina el papel de otros actores internacionales en la información internacional, en especial dos organizaciones internacionales (Unión Europea y OTAN), así como el rol de las ONGS en informaciones internacionales con impacto global como las referidas al cambio

Subjects

Periodismo | Periodismo | ciberpropaganda | ciberpropaganda | élico | élico | entrevista | entrevista | ón y OTAN | ón y OTAN | ómetro de conflictos | ómetro de conflictos | Grado en Periodismo | Grado en Periodismo | fuentes | fuentes | periodismo de conflictos | periodismo de conflictos | caso Couso | caso Couso | ática conflictos | ática conflictos | nuevas guerras | nuevas guerras | warblogs | warblogs | ón y ONGS | ón y ONGS | agencias | agencias | conflictos olvidados | conflictos olvidados | 2011 | 2011 | corresponsales | corresponsales | conflictos y redes sociales | conflictos y redes sociales | ónica | ónica | ética y conflictos | ética y conflictos | éneros periodísticos | éneros periodísticos | periodismo internacional | periodismo internacional | ón internacional | ón internacional | ciberterrorismo | ciberterrorismo | ón y Unión Europea | ón y Unión Europea

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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11.488 Urban Development in Conflict Cities: Planning Challenges and Policy Innovations (MIT) 11.488 Urban Development in Conflict Cities: Planning Challenges and Policy Innovations (MIT)

Description

Economic, religious, gender, and ethnic differences must be negotiated every day in the urban arena. When tensions and conflict escalate into violence, the urban space becomes the battlespace in which these tensions are negotiated. This course examines urban development challenges in conflict cities through multiple disciplinary perspectives on urban conflict. This course also reviews literature that focuses on when violence and cities intersect. Students will learn about policy innovations, and study potential planning, design, and policy solutions. Economic, religious, gender, and ethnic differences must be negotiated every day in the urban arena. When tensions and conflict escalate into violence, the urban space becomes the battlespace in which these tensions are negotiated. This course examines urban development challenges in conflict cities through multiple disciplinary perspectives on urban conflict. This course also reviews literature that focuses on when violence and cities intersect. Students will learn about policy innovations, and study potential planning, design, and policy solutions.

Subjects

policy | policy | government | government | conflict | conflict | development | development | war | war | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | religious conflict | religious conflict | violence | violence | urban security | urban security | conflict zones | conflict zones | military | military | slums | slums | gender | gender | gangs | gangs | peace | peace | reconstruction | reconstruction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.667 Negotiation and Conflict Management (MIT) 15.667 Negotiation and Conflict Management (MIT)

Description

Negotiation and Conflict Management presents negotiation theory – strategies and styles – within an employment context. 15.667 meets only eleven times, with a different topic each week, which is why students should commit to attending all classes. In addition to the theory and exercises presented in class, students practice negotiating with role-playing simulations that cover a range of topics. Students also learn how to negotiate in difficult situations, which include abrasiveness, racism, sexism, whistle-blowing, and emergencies. The course covers conflict management as a first party and as a third party: third-party skills include helping others deal directly with their conflicts, mediation, investigation, arbitration, and helping the system change as a result of a dispute. Negotiation and Conflict Management presents negotiation theory – strategies and styles – within an employment context. 15.667 meets only eleven times, with a different topic each week, which is why students should commit to attending all classes. In addition to the theory and exercises presented in class, students practice negotiating with role-playing simulations that cover a range of topics. Students also learn how to negotiate in difficult situations, which include abrasiveness, racism, sexism, whistle-blowing, and emergencies. The course covers conflict management as a first party and as a third party: third-party skills include helping others deal directly with their conflicts, mediation, investigation, arbitration, and helping the system change as a result of a dispute.

Subjects

negotiation | negotiation | conflict | conflict | persuasion | persuasion | bargaining | bargaining | negotiating strategy | negotiating strategy | power | power | distributive | distributive | integrative | integrative | mixed motive | mixed motive | creating solutions | creating solutions | conflict management systems | conflict management systems | negotiator | negotiator | ethics | ethics | advocate | advocate | job hiring | job hiring | gender and culture differences | gender and culture differences | dispute prevention | dispute prevention | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | systems approach | systems approach | complaint handling | complaint handling | conciliation | conciliation | mediation | mediation | arbitration | arbitration | investigation | investigation | negotiating with difficult people | negotiating with difficult people | negotiation theory | negotiation theory | negotiation style | negotiation style | employment | employment | power sources | power sources | conflicts | conflicts | first parties | first parties | third parties | third parties | disputes | disputes | system change | system change | difficult people | difficult people | competition | competition | cooperation | cooperation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Managing Conflict - Mini Lecture

Description

• Manage conflict more effectively by applying techniques

Subjects

conflict | managing conflict | strategies for managing conflict | symptoms of conflict | conflict resolution | employability | ukoer | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT) 21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates. This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | English background | American Revolution effects | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | pamphlets | correspondence | correspondence | resistance organizations | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | constitutional documents | debates | debates | colonial resistance | colonial resistance | republicanism | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-Western countries. The issues covered by the course include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing and labor standards, post-conflict development and the role of aid in development. This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-Western countries. The issues covered by the course include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing and labor standards, post-conflict development and the role of aid in development.

Subjects

international development | international development | colonialism | colonialism | imperialism | imperialism | human rights | human rights | global | global | state | state | markets | markets | NGOs | NGOs | social movements | social movements | urban | urban | rural | rural | migration | migration | trade | trade | outsourcing | outsourcing | corruption | corruption | aid | aid | poverty | poverty | security | security | conflict | conflict | state intervention | state intervention | governance | governance | law | law | privatization | privatization | participatory planning | participatory planning | decentralization | decentralization | civil service | civil service | labor | labor | post-conflict | post-conflict

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Conflict Management - Learning Package

Description

A learning activity about Conflict Management. It introduces the concepts of conflict, managing conflict and influencing. The inter-relationship between the concepts is examined.

Subjects

conflict | symptoms of conflict | strategies for managing conflict | conflict resolution | influencing | employability | ukoer | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Conflict Management - Raw Materials

Description

The raw materials for a learning activity about Conflict Management. It introduces the concepts of conflict, managing conflict and influencing. The inter-relationship between the concepts is examined.

Subjects

conflict | symptoms of conflict | strategies for managing conflict | influencing | conflict resolution | employability | ukoer | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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15.277 Special Seminar in Communications: Leadership and Personal Effectiveness Coaching (MIT) 15.277 Special Seminar in Communications: Leadership and Personal Effectiveness Coaching (MIT)

Description

This course builds on the work done concurrently in 15.280 Communication for Managers and 15.311 Organizational Processes in the first semester of the MBA program. 15.280 is offered for 6 units and 15.277 provides an additional 3 units for a total of 9 units in Managerial Communication. 15.277 acts as a lab component to 15.280 and provides students additional opportunities to hone their communication skills through a variety of in-class exercises. Emphasis is on both individual and team communication. This course builds on the work done concurrently in 15.280 Communication for Managers and 15.311 Organizational Processes in the first semester of the MBA program. 15.280 is offered for 6 units and 15.277 provides an additional 3 units for a total of 9 units in Managerial Communication. 15.277 acts as a lab component to 15.280 and provides students additional opportunities to hone their communication skills through a variety of in-class exercises. Emphasis is on both individual and team communication.

Subjects

receiving feedback | receiving feedback | storytelling | storytelling | leadership vision | leadership vision | communication | communication | communication for managers | communication for managers | team communication | team communication | culture and leadership | culture and leadership | managing conflict | managing conflict | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | Distributed Leadership Model | Distributed Leadership Model | Organizational Processes | Organizational Processes | informational interviewing | informational interviewing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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RSC Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture 2011: Waiting for solutions in uncertain times: Palestine refugees in the Middle East context

Description

This podcast was recorded at the RSC Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture on 16 November 2011. The lecture was delivered by Mr Filippo Grandi, Commissioner-General of United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees. This podcast was recorded on 16 November 2011 at the RSC Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture 2011. The lecture was delivered by Mr Filippo Grandi, Commissioner-General of United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees at the Examination Schools, University of Oxford Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

occupied territories | funds | unrwa | palestine | education | refugees | arab-israel conflict | conflict | education programmes | occupied territories | funds | unrwa | palestine | education | refugees | arab-israel conflict | conflict | education programmes

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Conflicts and Post-Conflicts Dynamics (DRC and Rwanda): Occult Beliefs versus Modern Politics, Truth versus Justice and Justice versus Peace

Description

Alex Ntung provides insight into the significance of occult beliefs in the construction of modern political ideologies Alex Ntung was born into a family of cattle-herders, semi-nomadic and pastoralists in South Kivu. Growing up he survived extreme poverty and hardship, child spying, and violence at a terrifying scale. His hunger for education took him to a school in Uvira and then university in Rwanda. Here he was witness to the 1994 genocide and the subsequent violence and conflict in the region fuelled by Tutsi and Hutu ethnicity. He became a humanitarian worker for UN related NGOs and then came to the UK where he underwent a stringent asylum process and later gained an MA in Anthropology of Conflict, Violence and Conciliation at the University of Sussex. He is currently an author, DRC a Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

conflict | post-conflict | genocide | occult beliefs | conflict | post-conflict | genocide | occult beliefs

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.255 Negotiation and Dispute Resolution in the Public Sector (MIT) 11.255 Negotiation and Dispute Resolution in the Public Sector (MIT)

Description

This course investigates social conflict and distributional disputes in the public sector. While theoretical aspects of conflict are considered, the focus of the class is on the practice of dispute resolution. Comparisons between unassisted and assisted negotiation are reviewed along with the techniques of facilitation and mediation. This course investigates social conflict and distributional disputes in the public sector. While theoretical aspects of conflict are considered, the focus of the class is on the practice of dispute resolution. Comparisons between unassisted and assisted negotiation are reviewed along with the techniques of facilitation and mediation.

Subjects

negotiation | negotiation | public dispute | public dispute | agreement | agreement | dispute resolution | dispute resolution | conflict management | conflict management | consensus | consensus | mutual gains | mutual gains | hard bargaining | hard bargaining | conflict assessment | conflict assessment | stakeholder interest | stakeholder interest | distributive bargaining | distributive bargaining | integrative bargaining | integrative bargaining | coalition builidng | coalition builidng | multi-party negotiation | multi-party negotiation | competition | competition | cooperation | cooperation | facilitation | facilitation | mediation | mediation | dispute systems design | dispute systems design | coalition building | coalition building

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.488 Urban Development in Conflict Cities: Planning Challenges and Policy Innovations (MIT)

Description

Economic, religious, gender, and ethnic differences must be negotiated every day in the urban arena. When tensions and conflict escalate into violence, the urban space becomes the battlespace in which these tensions are negotiated. This course examines urban development challenges in conflict cities through multiple disciplinary perspectives on urban conflict. This course also reviews literature that focuses on when violence and cities intersect. Students will learn about policy innovations, and study potential planning, design, and policy solutions.

Subjects

policy | government | conflict | development | war | ethnic conflict | religious conflict | violence | urban security | conflict zones | military | slums | gender | gangs | peace | reconstruction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq,

Subjects

Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | Corruption | Corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | why cities become torn | ethnic | ethnic | religious | religious | racial | racial | nationalist | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | violence | inequality | inequality | social injustice | social injustice | solutions | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | regional or transnational | policymaking | policymaking | democratic participation | democratic participation | citizenship | citizenship | spatial | spatial | infrastructural | infrastructural | technological interventions | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democracy | democratic | democratic | territory | territory | territorial | territorial | participation | participation | policy | policy | theoretical | theoretical | practical | practical | identity | identity | conflict | conflict | social | social | political | political | theories | theories | regional | regional | transnational | transnational | levels of determination | levels of determination | institutional | institutional | technological | technological | interventions | interventions | city | city | difference | difference | diversity | diversity | equality | equality | class | class | cities | cities | nations | nations | legal | legal | jurisdiction | jurisdiction | peace | peace | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.667 Negotiation and Conflict Management (MIT)

Description

Negotiation and Conflict Management presents negotiation theory – strategies and styles – within an employment context. 15.667 meets only eleven times, with a different topic each week, which is why students should commit to attending all classes. In addition to the theory and exercises presented in class, students practice negotiating with role-playing simulations that cover a range of topics. Students also learn how to negotiate in difficult situations, which include abrasiveness, racism, sexism, whistle-blowing, and emergencies. The course covers conflict management as a first party and as a third party: third-party skills include helping others deal directly with their conflicts, mediation, investigation, arbitration, and helping the system change as a result of a dispute.

Subjects

negotiation | conflict | persuasion | bargaining | negotiating strategy | power | distributive | integrative | mixed motive | creating solutions | conflict management systems | negotiator | ethics | advocate | job hiring | gender and culture differences | dispute prevention | conflict resolution | systems approach | complaint handling | conciliation | mediation | arbitration | investigation | negotiating with difficult people | negotiation theory | negotiation style | employment | power sources | conflicts | first parties | third parties | disputes | system change | difficult people | competition | cooperation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Iraq | Iraq | president | president | division of power | division of power | China | China | gross domestic product | gross domestic product | GDP | GDP | political science | political science | culture | culture | Italy | Italy | Putnam | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | Lipset | leadership | leadership | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | democratization | democratization | modernization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | culture studies | culture studies | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | gender identity | gender identity | religious identity | religious identity | racial identity | racial identity | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social movements | social movements | identity politics | identity politics | indigenous rights movements | indigenous rights movements | transnational institutions | transnational institutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.405 Seminar on Politics and Conflict in the Middle East (MIT) 17.405 Seminar on Politics and Conflict in the Middle East (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on evolution of contemporary politics and economics. The subject is divided into four parts: Context: historical and strategic perspectives, theoretical issues, and sources and forms of conflict; Continuity: detailed analysis conflicts systems and their persistence, as well as regional competition and recent wars – focusing on specific countries and cases; Complexity: highlighting situation specific strategic gains and losses; and Convergence: focusing future configurations of conflict and cooperation. Throughout the course, special attention is given to sources and transformations of power, population dynamics and migration, resources and energy, as well as implications of technological change. This course focuses on evolution of contemporary politics and economics. The subject is divided into four parts: Context: historical and strategic perspectives, theoretical issues, and sources and forms of conflict; Continuity: detailed analysis conflicts systems and their persistence, as well as regional competition and recent wars – focusing on specific countries and cases; Complexity: highlighting situation specific strategic gains and losses; and Convergence: focusing future configurations of conflict and cooperation. Throughout the course, special attention is given to sources and transformations of power, population dynamics and migration, resources and energy, as well as implications of technological change.

Subjects

middle east | middle east | contemporary politics | contemporary politics | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | economics | economics | history | history | domestic policy | domestic policy | regional politics | regional politics | power | power | war | war | peace | peace | negotiation | negotiation | Iraq | Iraq | nation state | nation state | arab | arab | israel | israel | lebanon | lebanon | jordan | jordan | palestine | palestine | persian gulf | persian gulf | saudia arabia | saudia arabia | turkey | turkey | iran | iran | egypt | egypt | sudan | sudan | north africa | north africa | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | conflict | conflict | cooperation | cooperation | population dynamics | population dynamics | migration | migration | natural resources | natural resources | energy | energy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Influencing - Mini Lecture

Description

A short mini lecture on influencing which is concerned with trying to involve people in problems and situations for mutual benefit. The lecture covers two different styles of influencing: the push and the pull style and then goes on to look at the Margerison and McCann Influencing Skills model.

Subjects

influencing | influencing skills | conflict | conflict resolution | managing conflict | employability | ukoer | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Shadow of the ICC: Positive Complementarity and the Situation in Kenya

Description

Professor Chandra Sriram (SOAS) gives a talk for the Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict/Changing Character of War Seminar Series. Introduced by Jennifer Welsh (Oxford). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

torture | Kenya | ICC | Africa | UN | military | politics | terrorism | war | armed conflict | torture | Kenya | ICC | Africa | UN | military | politics | terrorism | war | armed conflict | 2011-10-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Strategy for Action: Using Force Wisely in the 21st Century

Description

Commodore Steve Jermy (Royal Navy) gives a talk for the Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict seminar series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

afghanistan | iraq | justice | peace | military | ethics | law | war | armed conflict | afghanistan | iraq | justice | peace | military | ethics | law | war | armed conflict | 2011-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Intervening to Protect Civilians: Debating the NATO-led mission in Libya

Description

Professor Jennifer Welsh, Dr David Rodin, Dr Cheyney Ryan and Dapo Akande (ELAC) debate the recent NATO led mission in Libya. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

libya | NATO | politics | ethics | war | conflict | libya | NATO | politics | ethics | war | conflict | 2011-05-19

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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