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21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT) 21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Rome | Rome | ancient | ancient | world | world | origins | origins | fifth century A.D. | fifth century A.D. | Kingship | Kingship | Republican form | Republican form | conquest | conquest | Italy | Italy | Roman expansion | Roman expansion | Pyrrhus | Pyrrhus | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | classes | classes | courts | courts | Roman revolution | Roman revolution | Augustus | Augustus | empire | empire | Virgil | Virgil | Vandals | Vandals | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | provinces | provinces | primary sources | primary sources | translation | translation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT) 21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century. This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | medieval | ancient history | ancient history | europe | europe | culture | culture | politics | politics | mediterranean | mediterranean | germanic | germanic | byzantine | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | carolingian renaissance | islamic | islamic | crusades | crusades | religion | religion | economics | economics | feudalism | feudalism | barbarian | barbarian | charlemagne | charlemagne | england | england | ottonian | ottonian | empire | empire | rome | rome | gothic | gothic | monarchy | monarchy | Western Europe | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | Mediterranean civilization | social development | social development | cultural development | cultural development | political development | political development | religious life | religious life | women | women | high medieval economy | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | high medieval culture | twelfth century | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT) 21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction. This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Subjects

history | history | silk road | silk road | China | China | Russia | Russia | Central Eurasia | Central Eurasia | mongolia | mongolia | turkey | turkey | religion | religion | trade | trade | war | war | tradition | tradition | culture | culture | soviet union | soviet union | islam | islam | buddhism | buddhism | christianity | christianity | confucianism | confucianism | marco polo | marco polo | rabban sauma | rabban sauma | film | film | travelogue | travelogue | music | music | empire | empire | nomad | nomad | conquest | conquest

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT) 21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o

Subjects

21G.084 | 21G.084 | 21A.224 | 21A.224 | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Latin America | Latin America | conquest | conquest | slavery | slavery | race | race | class | class | Salvador Allende | Salvador Allende | Democracy | Democracy | revolution | revolution | Environment | Environment | ecology | ecology | land disputes | land disputes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT) 21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This HASS-D/CI course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21F.020J (New World Literature), 21F.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21F.730 (Twentieth-Century Hispanic American Literature), 21F.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.508 (Regime Change), and 17.554 (Political Economy of Latin America). This HASS-D/CI course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21F.020J (New World Literature), 21F.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21F.730 (Twentieth-Century Hispanic American Literature), 21F.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.508 (Regime Change), and 17.554 (Political Economy of Latin America).

Subjects

market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Latin America | Latin America | conquest | conquest | slavery | slavery | race | race | class | class | Salvador Allende | Salvador Allende | Democracy | Democracy | revolution | revolution | Environment | Environment | ecology | ecology | land disputes | land disputes | 21F.084J | 21F.084J | 21F.084 | 21F.084 | 21A.224 | 21A.224

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT) 21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Rome | Rome | ancient | ancient | world | world | origins | origins | fifth century A.D. | fifth century A.D. | Kingship | Kingship | Republican form | Republican form | conquest | conquest | Italy | Italy | Roman expansion | Roman expansion | Pyrrhus | Pyrrhus | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | classes | classes | courts | courts | Roman revolution | Roman revolution | Augustus | Augustus | empire | empire | Virgil | Virgil | Vandals | Vandals | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | provinces | provinces | primary sources | primary sources | translation | translation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT) 21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century. This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | medieval | ancient history | ancient history | europe | europe | culture | culture | politics | politics | mediterranean | mediterranean | germanic | germanic | byzantine | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | carolingian renaissance | islamic | islamic | crusades | crusades | religion | religion | economics | economics | feudalism | feudalism | barbarian | barbarian | charlemagne | charlemagne | england | england | ottonian | ottonian | empire | empire | rome | rome | gothic | gothic | monarchy | monarchy | Western Europe | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | Mediterranean civilization | social development | social development | cultural development | cultural development | political development | political development | religious life | religious life | women | women | high medieval economy | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | high medieval culture | twelfth century | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT) 21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction. This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Subjects

history | history | silk road | silk road | China | China | Russia | Russia | Central Eurasia | Central Eurasia | mongolia | mongolia | turkey | turkey | religion | religion | trade | trade | war | war | tradition | tradition | culture | culture | soviet union | soviet union | islam | islam | buddhism | buddhism | christianity | christianity | confucianism | confucianism | marco polo | marco polo | rabban sauma | rabban sauma | film | film | travelogue | travelogue | music | music | empire | empire | nomad | nomad | conquest | conquest

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT) 21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT)

Description

The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti

Subjects

Literature | Literature | celtic | celtic | colonization | colonization | King Arthur | King Arthur | Knights of the Round Table | Knights of the Round Table | British Imperialism | British Imperialism | Catholic Church | Catholic Church | twelfth century | twelfth century | thirteenth century | thirteenth century | morphology | morphology | Arthurian romance | Arthurian romance | historical documents | historical documents | English conquests | English conquests | Brittany | Brittany | Wales | Wales | Scotland | Scotland | Ireland | Ireland | Bede | Bede | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Chr?tien de Troyes | Chr?tien de Troyes | Marie de France | Marie de France | Gerald of Wales | Gerald of Wales | Perilous Graveyard | Perilous Graveyard | Knight of the Sword | Knight of the Sword | Perlesvaus | Perlesvaus | High History of the Holy Graal | High History of the Holy Graal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.441 The Conquest of America (MIT) 21A.441 The Conquest of America (MIT)

Description

In this course the conquest and colonization of the Americas is considered, with special attention to the struggles of native peoples in Guatemala, Canada, Brazil, Panama, and colonial New England. In two segments of the course-one devoted to the Jesuit missionization of the Huron in the 1630s, the other to struggles between the government of Panama and the Kuna between 1900 and 1925-students examine primary documents such as letters, reports, and court records, to draw their own conclusions. Attention focuses on how we know about and represent past eras and other peoples, as well as on the history of struggles between native Americans and Europeans. In this course the conquest and colonization of the Americas is considered, with special attention to the struggles of native peoples in Guatemala, Canada, Brazil, Panama, and colonial New England. In two segments of the course-one devoted to the Jesuit missionization of the Huron in the 1630s, the other to struggles between the government of Panama and the Kuna between 1900 and 1925-students examine primary documents such as letters, reports, and court records, to draw their own conclusions. Attention focuses on how we know about and represent past eras and other peoples, as well as on the history of struggles between native Americans and Europeans.

Subjects

history | history | cultural anthropology | cultural anthropology | conquest | conquest | colonization | colonization | Americas | Americas | native people | native people | Guatemala | Guatemala | Canada | Canada | Brazil | Brazil | Panama | Panama | colonial New England | colonial New England | Jesuit | Jesuit | mission | mission | Huron | Huron | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | politics | politics | Kuna | Kuna | twentieth century | twentieth century | conflict | conflict | europe | europe | indian | indian | native americans | native americans | missions | missions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.55J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT) 17.55J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

Interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin America, drawing on films, literature, popular press accounts, and scholarly research. Topics include economic development, ethnic and racial identity, religion, revolution, democracy, transitional justice, and the rule of law. Examples draw on a range of countries in the region, especially Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. Includes a heavy oral participation component, with regular breakout groups, formal class presentations on pressing social issues (such as criminal justice and land tenure), and a structured class debate. Interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin America, drawing on films, literature, popular press accounts, and scholarly research. Topics include economic development, ethnic and racial identity, religion, revolution, democracy, transitional justice, and the rule of law. Examples draw on a range of countries in the region, especially Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. Includes a heavy oral participation component, with regular breakout groups, formal class presentations on pressing social issues (such as criminal justice and land tenure), and a structured class debate.

Subjects

17.55 | 17.55 | 21A.430 | 21A.430 | 21G.084 | 21G.084 | Mexico | Mexico | Venezuela | Venezuela | Brazil | Brazil | Chile | Chile | Latin America | Latin America | Spanish | Spanish | conquest | conquest | authoritarianism | authoritarianism | democracy | democracy | dictators | dictators | argentina | argentina | united states foreign policy | united states foreign policy | urbanization | urbanization | poverty | poverty | Big Mama's Funeral | Big Mama's Funeral | development | development | Pinochet | Pinochet | Allende | Allende | civilian-military relations | civilian-military relations | police reform | police reform | corruption | corruption | The House of Spirits | The House of Spirits | The Battle of Chile | The Battle of Chile | chinchillas | chinchillas

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT) 21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o

Subjects

21G.084 | 21G.084 | 21A.224 | 21A.224 | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Latin America | Latin America | conquest | conquest | slavery | slavery | race | race | class | class | Salvador Allende | Salvador Allende | Democracy | Democracy | revolution | revolution | Environment | Environment | ecology | ecology | land disputes | land disputes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | Rome | ancient | world | origins | fifth century A.D. | Kingship | Republican form | conquest | Italy | Roman expansion | Pyrrhus | Punic Wars | classes | courts | Roman revolution | Augustus | empire | Virgil | Vandals | social | economic | political | religious | trends | provinces | primary sources | translation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | ancient history | europe | culture | politics | mediterranean | germanic | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | islamic | crusades | religion | economics | feudalism | barbarian | charlemagne | england | ottonian | empire | rome | gothic | monarchy | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | social development | cultural development | political development | religious life | women | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Subjects

history | silk road | China | Russia | Central Eurasia | mongolia | turkey | religion | trade | war | tradition | culture | soviet union | islam | buddhism | christianity | confucianism | marco polo | rabban sauma | film | travelogue | music | empire | nomad | conquest

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | ancient history | europe | culture | politics | mediterranean | germanic | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | islamic | crusades | religion | economics | feudalism | barbarian | charlemagne | england | ottonian | empire | rome | gothic | monarchy | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | social development | cultural development | political development | religious life | women | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Subjects

history | silk road | China | Russia | Central Eurasia | mongolia | turkey | religion | trade | war | tradition | culture | soviet union | islam | buddhism | christianity | confucianism | marco polo | rabban sauma | film | travelogue | music | empire | nomad | conquest

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Colonial Latin and South America

Description

This course will introduce the student to the history of Latin and South America from the year in which European explorers first discovered and began to colonize the region to the early 19th century, when many Latin and South American colonies declared their independence from European rule. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout Latin and South America during this 400-year period. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the interaction between native peoples and European settlers created diverse and complex colonial societies throughout Latin and South America, and why the colonies of the region eventually declared their independence from European political control. This free course may be completed onli

Subjects

iberia | spain | portugal | africa | religion | trade | america | conquest | mexico | peru | columbian exchange | colonization | settlement | slavery | caste | class | family | women | trans-atlantic | hapsburg | bourbon | brazil | revolution | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT)

Description

The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti

Subjects

Literature | celtic | colonization | King Arthur | Knights of the Round Table | British Imperialism | Catholic Church | twelfth century | thirteenth century | morphology | Arthurian romance | historical documents | English conquests | Brittany | Wales | Scotland | Ireland | Bede | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Chr?tien de Troyes | Marie de France | Gerald of Wales | Perilous Graveyard | Knight of the Sword | Perlesvaus | High History of the Holy Graal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o

Subjects

21G.084 | 21A.224 | market-oriented reform | Latin America | conquest | slavery | race | class | Salvador Allende | Democracy | revolution | Environment | ecology | land disputes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Subjects

history | silk road | China | Russia | Central Eurasia | mongolia | turkey | religion | trade | war | tradition | culture | soviet union | islam | buddhism | christianity | confucianism | marco polo | rabban sauma | film | travelogue | music | empire | nomad | conquest

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o

Subjects

21G.084 | 21A.224 | market-oriented reform | Latin America | conquest | slavery | race | class | Salvador Allende | Democracy | revolution | Environment | ecology | land disputes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This HASS-D/CI course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21F.020J (New World Literature), 21F.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21F.730 (Twentieth-Century Hispanic American Literature), 21F.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.508 (Regime Change), and 17.554 (Political Economy of Latin America).

Subjects

market-oriented reform | Latin America | conquest | slavery | race | class | Salvador Allende | Democracy | revolution | Environment | ecology | land disputes | 21F.084J | 21F.084 | 21A.224

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.441 The Conquest of America (MIT)

Description

In this course the conquest and colonization of the Americas is considered, with special attention to the struggles of native peoples in Guatemala, Canada, Brazil, Panama, and colonial New England. In two segments of the course-one devoted to the Jesuit missionization of the Huron in the 1630s, the other to struggles between the government of Panama and the Kuna between 1900 and 1925-students examine primary documents such as letters, reports, and court records, to draw their own conclusions. Attention focuses on how we know about and represent past eras and other peoples, as well as on the history of struggles between native Americans and Europeans.

Subjects

history | cultural anthropology | conquest | colonization | Americas | native people | Guatemala | Canada | Brazil | Panama | colonial New England | Jesuit | mission | Huron | seventeenth century | politics | Kuna | twentieth century | conflict | europe | indian | native americans | missions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21F.020J (New World Literature), 21F.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21F.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21F.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o

Subjects

market-oriented reform | Latin America | conquest | slavery | race | class | Salvador Allende | Democracy | revolution | Environment | ecology | land disputes | 21F.084 | 21A.224

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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