Searching for constellations : 12 results found | RSS Feed for this search

6.450 Principles of Digital Communication - I (MIT) 6.450 Principles of Digital Communication - I (MIT)

Description

6.450 was offered in Fall 2002 as a relatively new elective on digital communication. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451, is offered in the spring.Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication. 6.450 was offered in Fall 2002 as a relatively new elective on digital communication. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451, is offered in the spring.Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication.

Subjects

digital communication | digital communication | data compression | data compression | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | scalar quantization | scalar quantization | vector quantization | vector quantization | sampling | sampling | aliasing | aliasing | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | PAM modulation | PAM modulation | QAM modulation | QAM modulation | signal constellations | signal constellations | finite-energy waveform spaces | finite-energy waveform spaces | detection | detection | communication system design | communication system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT) 6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm.More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and min-sum algorithms This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm.More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and min-sum algorithms

Subjects

coding techniques | coding techniques | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | performance analysis | performance analysis | Small signal constellations | Small signal constellations | coding gain | coding gain | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Reed-Muller codes | Reed-Muller codes | finite fields | finite fields | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | binary linear convolutional codes | binary linear convolutional codes | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | trellis-based ML decoding | trellis-based ML decoding | Codes on graphs | Codes on graphs | sum-product | sum-product | max-product | max-product | decoding algorithms | decoding algorithms | Turbo codes | Turbo codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Lattice codes | Lattice codes | Trellis-coded modulation | Trellis-coded modulation | Multilevel coding | Multilevel coding | Shaping | Shaping

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.450 Principles of Digital Communications I (MIT) 6.450 Principles of Digital Communications I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451, is offered in the spring. Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451, is offered in the spring. Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication.

Subjects

digital communication | digital communication | data compression | data compression | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | scalar quantization | scalar quantization | vector quantization | vector quantization | sampling | sampling | aliasing | aliasing | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | PAM modulation | PAM modulation | QAM modulation | QAM modulation | signal constellations | signal constellations | finite-energy waveform spaces | finite-energy waveform spaces | detection | detection | communication system design | communication system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT) 6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm. More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm. More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and

Subjects

coding techniques | coding techniques | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | performance analysis | performance analysis | Small signal constellations | Small signal constellations | coding gain | coding gain | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Reed-Muller codes | Reed-Muller codes | finite fields | finite fields | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | binary linear convolutional codes | binary linear convolutional codes | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | trellis-based ML decoding | trellis-based ML decoding | Codes on graphs | Codes on graphs | sum-product | sum-product | max-product | max-product | decoding algorithms | decoding algorithms | Turbo codes | Turbo codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Lattice codes. | Lattice codes. | Trellis-coded modulation | Trellis-coded modulation | Multilevel coding | Multilevel coding | Shaping | Shaping | Lattice codes | Lattice codes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.450 Principles of Digital Communication I (MIT) 6.450 Principles of Digital Communication I (MIT)

Description

The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II, is offered in the spring. Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II, is offered in the spring. Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication.

Subjects

digital communication | digital communication | data compression | data compression | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | scalar quantization | scalar quantization | vector quantization | vector quantization | sampling | sampling | aliasing | aliasing | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | PAM modulation | PAM modulation | QAM modulation | QAM modulation | signal constellations | signal constellations | finite-energy waveform spaces | finite-energy waveform spaces | detection | detection | communication system design | communication system design | wireless | wireless | discrete source encoding | discrete source encoding | memory-less sources | memory-less sources | entropy | entropy | asymptotic equipartition property | asymptotic equipartition property | Fourier series | Fourier series | Fourier transforms | Fourier transforms | sampling theorem | sampling theorem | orthonormal expansions | orthonormal expansions | random processes | random processes | linear functionals | linear functionals | theorem of irrelevance | theorem of irrelevance | Doppler spread | Doppler spread | time spread | time spread | coherence time | coherence time | coherence frequency | coherence frequency | Rayleigh fading | Rayleigh fading | Rake receivers | Rake receivers | CDMA | CDMA | code division multiple access | code division multiple access

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

National schools' observatory

Description

A useful website full of useful teaching resources about the night's sky, stars and constellations.

Subjects

observatory | space | stars | constellations | Education / Training / Teaching | Mathematics | Physical Sciences | Education | Physical sciences | X000 | F000 | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | SCIENCES and MATHEMATICS | G | R

License

Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.450 Principles of Digital Communication - I (MIT)

Description

6.450 was offered in Fall 2002 as a relatively new elective on digital communication. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451, is offered in the spring.Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication.

Subjects

digital communication | data compression | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | scalar quantization | vector quantization | sampling | aliasing | Nyquist criterion | PAM modulation | QAM modulation | signal constellations | finite-energy waveform spaces | detection | communication system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm.More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and min-sum algorithms

Subjects

coding techniques | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | performance analysis | Small signal constellations | coding gain | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Reed-Muller codes | finite fields | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | binary linear convolutional codes | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | trellis-based ML decoding | Codes on graphs | sum-product | max-product | decoding algorithms | Turbo codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Lattice codes | Trellis-coded modulation | Multilevel coding | Shaping

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.450 Principles of Digital Communication I (MIT)

Description

The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II, is offered in the spring. Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication.

Subjects

digital communication | data compression | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | scalar quantization | vector quantization | sampling | aliasing | Nyquist criterion | PAM modulation | QAM modulation | signal constellations | finite-energy waveform spaces | detection | communication system design | wireless | discrete source encoding | memory-less sources | entropy | asymptotic equipartition property | Fourier series | Fourier transforms | sampling theorem | orthonormal expansions | random processes | linear functionals | theorem of irrelevance | Doppler spread | time spread | coherence time | coherence frequency | Rayleigh fading | Rake receivers | CDMA | code division multiple access

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.450 Principles of Digital Communications I (MIT)

Description

The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451, is offered in the spring. Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication.

Subjects

digital communication | data compression | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | scalar quantization | vector quantization | sampling | aliasing | Nyquist criterion | PAM modulation | QAM modulation | signal constellations | finite-energy waveform spaces | detection | communication system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of a two-term sequence with 6.450. The focus is on coding techniques for approaching the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels, their performance analysis, and design principles. After a review of 6.450 and the Shannon limit for AWGN channels, the course begins by discussing small signal constellations, performance analysis and coding gain, and hard-decision and soft-decision decoding. It continues with binary linear block codes, Reed-Muller codes, finite fields, Reed-Solomon and BCH codes, binary linear convolutional codes, and the Viterbi algorithm. More advanced topics include trellis representations of binary linear block codes and trellis-based decoding; codes on graphs; the sum-product and min-sum algorithms; the BCJR algorithm; tur

Subjects

coding techniques | the Shannon limit of additive white Gaussian noise channels | performance analysis | Small signal constellations | coding gain | Hard-decision and soft-decision decoding | Introduction to binary linear block codes | Reed-Muller codes | finite fields | Reed-Solomon and BCH codes | binary linear convolutional codes | Viterbi and BCJR algorithms | Trellis representations of binary linear block codes | trellis-based ML decoding | Codes on graphs | sum-product | max-product | decoding algorithms | Turbo codes | LDPC codes and RA codes | Coding for the bandwidth-limited regime | Lattice codes. | Trellis-coded modulation | Multilevel coding | Shaping | Lattice codes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

In the night sky: Orion

Description

In this free course, In the night sky: Orion, you will explore the night sky, discover how stars formed and find out about exoplanets, all through the constellation of Orion. First published on Thu, 23 Feb 2017 as In the night sky: Orion. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2017

Subjects

Science | Maths & Technology | INS_1 | Orion | stars | star formation | exoplanets | constellations

License

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata