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21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT) 21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates. This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | English background | American Revolution effects | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | pamphlets | correspondence | correspondence | resistance organizations | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | constitutional documents | debates | debates | colonial resistance | colonial resistance | republicanism | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students. This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | comparative politics | Aristotle | Aristotle | political research | political research | regimes | regimes | Marxist model | Marxist model | class alliances | class alliances | democracy | democracy | pluralism | pluralism | economic growth | economic growth | party formation | party formation | political elites | political elites | interest groups | interest groups | constitutional reform | constitutional reform | political system | political system | constitutional choice | constitutional choice | leadership | leadership | state formation | state formation | modernization | modernization | political institution | political institution | embedded autonomy | embedded autonomy | dead capital | dead capital | nationalism | nationalism | electoral behavior | electoral behavior | clientelism | clientelism | patronage politics | patronage politics | corruption | corruption | self-government | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.224 Law and Society in US History (MIT) 21H.224 Law and Society in US History (MIT)

Description

As events of the last few years have shown, the Supreme Court has played a crucial role in American political life. There is practically no issue of social significance in the American past that did not at some point end up in the nation's courtrooms, yet much of the workings of the constitution remain obscure. This subject is designed to introduce students to the main themes and events of American constitutional law since 1787. It introduces terms and concepts of law and legal history, focusing on three recurring themes in American public life: liberty, equality, and property. Readings consist mostly of original court cases, especially from the U.S. Supreme Court, but the focus of the class is on the historical connections between those cases and broader social, political, and cultural t As events of the last few years have shown, the Supreme Court has played a crucial role in American political life. There is practically no issue of social significance in the American past that did not at some point end up in the nation's courtrooms, yet much of the workings of the constitution remain obscure. This subject is designed to introduce students to the main themes and events of American constitutional law since 1787. It introduces terms and concepts of law and legal history, focusing on three recurring themes in American public life: liberty, equality, and property. Readings consist mostly of original court cases, especially from the U.S. Supreme Court, but the focus of the class is on the historical connections between those cases and broader social, political, and cultural t

Subjects

Supreme Court | Supreme Court | constitution | constitution | constitutional law | constitutional law | legal history | legal history | liberty | liberty | equality | equality | property | property | court cases | court cases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT) 17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure. This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

supreme court | supreme court | constitutional law | constitutional law | racial profiling | racial profiling | wartime | wartime | affirmative action | affirmative action | constitutionality | constitutionality | civil rights | civil rights | civil liberties | civil liberties | roe | roe | wade | wade | economic liberties | economic liberties | desegregation | desegregation | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | fundamental rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT) 17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure. This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

Supreme Court | Supreme Court | Congress | Congress | constitutional law | constitutional law | racial profiling | racial profiling | wartime | wartime | affirmative action | affirmative action | constitutionality | constitutionality | civil rights | civil rights | civil liberties | civil liberties | roe | roe | wade | wade | economic liberties | economic liberties | desegregation | desegregation | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | fundamental rights | federalism | federalism | separation of powers | separation of powers | supreme court cases | supreme court cases | marbury | marbury | madison | madison | mccullough | mccullough | maryland | maryland | bush | bush | gore | gore | dred scott | dred scott | sanford | sanford | brown | brown | board of education | board of education | equal protection of the laws | equal protection of the laws | immigration | immigration | welfare | welfare | Eighth Amendment | Eighth Amendment | First Amendment | First Amendment | poverty | poverty | criminal procedure | criminal procedure | World War II | World War II | Korean War | Korean War | post 9/11 america | post 9/11 america | judicial review | judicial review | religion | religion | citizenship | citizenship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | debates | colonial resistance | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | debates | colonial resistance | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1787 Constitutional Centennial March

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: 1787 Constitutional Centennial March Political Party: Federalist Date Made: 1887 Measurement: Sheet Music: 14 1/4 x 10 3/4 in.; 36.195 x 27.305 cm Classification: Publications Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5zmg There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | advertisements | sheetmusic | portraits | madisonjames | clevelandgrover | politics | washingtongeorge | hamiltonalexander | centennials | promotionalmaterials | busts | philadelphiapennsylvania | officersadministrators | presidents | history | politicians | constitutionoftheunitedstates | parades | commemoratives | musicalnotation | pianos | marketing | merchandise | musicalinstruments | culidentifier:value=2214sm0006 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber | march | fredtbaker | constitutionalcentennialmarch

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Bolduc_23.tif Theodore Bolduc Collection Image

Description

Subjects

ship | warship | unitedstatesnavy | usnavy | usn | ussconstitutionix21 | ussconstitution | ix21 | oldironsides | frigate | 44gunfrigate

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21H.224 Law and Society in US History (MIT)

Description

As events of the last few years have shown, the Supreme Court has played a crucial role in American political life. There is practically no issue of social significance in the American past that did not at some point end up in the nation's courtrooms, yet much of the workings of the constitution remain obscure. This subject is designed to introduce students to the main themes and events of American constitutional law since 1787. It introduces terms and concepts of law and legal history, focusing on three recurring themes in American public life: liberty, equality, and property. Readings consist mostly of original court cases, especially from the U.S. Supreme Court, but the focus of the class is on the historical connections between those cases and broader social, political, and cultural t

Subjects

Supreme Court | constitution | constitutional law | legal history | liberty | equality | property | court cases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Future of Human Rights

Description

Part of the 2010 Alumni Weekend. Timothy Endicott, Murray Hunt and Sandra Fredman discuss the future of human rights, looking at the human rights constitution, its critics and how to uphold human rights. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human rights | politics | human rights constitution | alumni | human rights | politics | human rights constitution | alumni | 2010-09-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | Aristotle | political research | regimes | Marxist model | class alliances | democracy | pluralism | economic growth | party formation | political elites | interest groups | constitutional reform | political system | constitutional choice | leadership | state formation | modernization | political institution | embedded autonomy | dead capital | nationalism | electoral behavior | clientelism | patronage politics | corruption | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.224 Law and Society in US History (MIT)

Description

As events of the last few years have shown, the Supreme Court has played a crucial role in American political life. There is practically no issue of social significance in the American past that did not at some point end up in the nation's courtrooms, yet much of the workings of the constitution remain obscure. This subject is designed to introduce students to the main themes and events of American constitutional law since 1787. It introduces terms and concepts of law and legal history, focusing on three recurring themes in American public life: liberty, equality, and property. Readings consist mostly of original court cases, especially from the U.S. Supreme Court, but the focus of the class is on the historical connections between those cases and broader social, political, and cultural t

Subjects

Supreme Court | constitution | constitutional law | legal history | liberty | equality | property | court cases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Paradoxes of State Power in America

Description

Professor Gary Gerstle in this 2012 Harmsworth lecture debates the paradoxes of state power in America, seeking to address the paradoxical legacy bestowed by the US Constitution: how can the US be so liberal and illiberal at the same time? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

politics | US constitution | america | politics | US constitution | america | 2012-11-27

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Paradoxes of State Power in America

Description

Professor Gary Gerstle in this 2012 Harmsworth lecture debates the paradoxes of state power in America, seeking to address the paradoxical legacy bestowed by the US Constitution: how can the US be so liberal and illiberal at the same time? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

politics | US constitution | america | politics | US constitution | america | 2012-11-27

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.346 The French Revolution and Napoleonic France (MIT) 21H.346 The French Revolution and Napoleonic France (MIT)

Description

The French esteem the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; journalists, politicians, scholars, and others outside France have called this moment the birth of modern political culture. In this subject we will begin with a brief survey of French politics, culture and society in the century prior to the Revolution, emphasizing the reasons for the end of the Old Regime and the origins of the Revolution. Next, we will examine the turbulent decade of the 1790s, when the French experimented with a constitutional monarchy, a republic, a dictatorship by committee, and a parliamentary form of government, only to end in a military coup d'état staged by Napoléon Bonaparte and his supporters. In 1804, Napoléon crowned himself emperor thus ini The French esteem the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; journalists, politicians, scholars, and others outside France have called this moment the birth of modern political culture. In this subject we will begin with a brief survey of French politics, culture and society in the century prior to the Revolution, emphasizing the reasons for the end of the Old Regime and the origins of the Revolution. Next, we will examine the turbulent decade of the 1790s, when the French experimented with a constitutional monarchy, a republic, a dictatorship by committee, and a parliamentary form of government, only to end in a military coup d'état staged by Napoléon Bonaparte and his supporters. In 1804, Napoléon crowned himself emperor thus ini

Subjects

French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleon | Napoleon | constitutional monarchy | constitutional monarchy | Old Regime | Old Regime | republic | republic | dictatorship | dictatorship | committee | committee | parliament | parliament | First Empire | First Empire

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Future of Human Rights

Description

Part of the 2010 Alumni Weekend. Timothy Endicott, Murray Hunt and Sandra Fredman discuss the future of human rights, looking at the human rights constitution, its critics and how to uphold human rights. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human rights | politics | human rights constitution | alumni | human rights | politics | human rights constitution | alumni | 2010-09-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Launch of Constitutional Studies Programme

Description

Marking the launch of Oxford's Constitutional Studies Programme, which seeks to increase the amount of interdisciplinary cooperation between law and political science in the field of constitutional studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

constitutional studies | law | political theory | constitutional studies | law | political theory | 2014-01-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Launch of Constitutional Studies Programme (Slides)

Description

Marking the launch of Oxford's Constitutional Studies Programme, which seeks to increase the amount of interdisciplinary cooperation between law and political science in the field of constitutional studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

constitutional studies | law | political theory | constitutional studies | law | political theory | 2014-01-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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De Gaulle's Republic 1958 - 1969 De Gaulle's Republic 1958 - 1969

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010, This module examines the founding first decade of the Fifth Republic by focusing principally, though not exclusively, on the personality and political ideas of Charles de Gaulle. It begins by examining his emergence as the providential leader of the Resistance, to the frustrations of the Liberation and his thwarted plans for the constitutional renaissance of France, through the Fourth Republic and the wilderness years to his return in 1958, before turning to focus on the new regime and tracing the political history of the Fifth Republic between 1958 and 1969: the period Pierre Viansson-Ponté christened ‘la République gaullienne’. The main, though by no means exclusi This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010, This module examines the founding first decade of the Fifth Republic by focusing principally, though not exclusively, on the personality and political ideas of Charles de Gaulle. It begins by examining his emergence as the providential leader of the Resistance, to the frustrations of the Liberation and his thwarted plans for the constitutional renaissance of France, through the Fourth Republic and the wilderness years to his return in 1958, before turning to focus on the new regime and tracing the political history of the Fifth Republic between 1958 and 1969: the period Pierre Viansson-Ponté christened ‘la République gaullienne’. The main, though by no means exclusi

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Fifth Republic | Fifth Republic | Charles de Gaulle | Charles de Gaulle | leader of the resistance | leader of the resistance | constitutional renaissance of France | constitutional renaissance of France | Fourth Republic | Fourth Republic | political history of the Fifth Republic | political history of the Fifth Republic | Pierre Viansson-Ponté | Pierre Viansson-Ponté | ukoer | ukoer | République gaullienne’. | République gaullienne’.

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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CC.111 Modern Conceptions of Freedom (MIT) CC.111 Modern Conceptions of Freedom (MIT)

Description

This course examines the modern definition of freedom, and the obligations that people accept in honoring it. It investigates how these obligations are captured in the principles of our political associations. This course also studies how the centrality of freedom plays out in the political thought of such authors as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke and Montesquieu, as well as debating which notions of freedom inspire and sustain the American experiment by careful reading of the documents and arguments of the founding of the United States. This course is part of the Concourse program at MIT. This course examines the modern definition of freedom, and the obligations that people accept in honoring it. It investigates how these obligations are captured in the principles of our political associations. This course also studies how the centrality of freedom plays out in the political thought of such authors as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke and Montesquieu, as well as debating which notions of freedom inspire and sustain the American experiment by careful reading of the documents and arguments of the founding of the United States. This course is part of the Concourse program at MIT.

Subjects

enlightenment | enlightenment | the Constitution | the Constitution | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Hobbes | Hobbes | Locke | Locke | Rousseau | Rousseau | Tocqueville | Tocqueville | Nietzche | Nietzche | founders | founders | liberty | liberty | popular sovereignty | popular sovereignty | human nature | human nature | politics | politics | Leviathan | Leviathan | government | government | Declaration of Independence | Declaration of Independence | American constitutionalism | American constitutionalism | Federalist Papers | Federalist Papers | equality | equality | statesmanship | statesmanship | Lincoln | Lincoln | modernity | modernity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 Constitutional Law: Structures of Power and Individual Rights (MIT) 17.245 Constitutional Law: Structures of Power and Individual Rights (MIT)

Description

This course examines American constitutional law in historical and modern context. It focuses closely on the constitutional text and Supreme Court case law. It explores the allocation of decision-making authority among government institutions, including the distribution of power across the branches of the federal government and between the federal and state governments. The course also examines the guarantees of individual rights and liberties stemming from the due process, equal protection, and other clauses in the Bill of Rights and post Civil War amendments.AcknowledgmentsProfessor Warshaw would like to acknowledge the training in Constitutional Law he received from Gary J. Jacobsohn, Kathleen Sullivan, and Norman Spaulding.   This course examines American constitutional law in historical and modern context. It focuses closely on the constitutional text and Supreme Court case law. It explores the allocation of decision-making authority among government institutions, including the distribution of power across the branches of the federal government and between the federal and state governments. The course also examines the guarantees of individual rights and liberties stemming from the due process, equal protection, and other clauses in the Bill of Rights and post Civil War amendments.AcknowledgmentsProfessor Warshaw would like to acknowledge the training in Constitutional Law he received from Gary J. Jacobsohn, Kathleen Sullivan, and Norman Spaulding.  

Subjects

federal and state government | federal and state government | Supreme Court | Supreme Court | constitutional law | constitutional law | judicial review | judicial review | judicial interpretation | judicial interpretation | nation-state relations | nation-state relations | commerce clause | commerce clause | Congress | Congress | taxing and spending power | taxing and spending power | due process | due process | economic liberty | economic liberty | right to privacy | right to privacy | personal liberty | personal liberty | abortion | abortion | racial discrimination | racial discrimination | affirmative action | affirmative action | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | economic discrimination | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | same-sex marriage | same-sex marriage | voting | voting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.20 Introduction to the American Political Process (MIT) 17.20 Introduction to the American Political Process (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with an introduction to the basic institutions of American government, especially as established in the constitution, and with an introduction to currents of thought among social scientists about the workings of U.S. politics. This is a communication intensive course. As such you are required to write at least 20 pages - that's the C.I. requirement - and participate in class discussions. This course provides students with an introduction to the basic institutions of American government, especially as established in the constitution, and with an introduction to currents of thought among social scientists about the workings of U.S. politics. This is a communication intensive course. As such you are required to write at least 20 pages - that's the C.I. requirement - and participate in class discussions.

Subjects

founding | founding | constitutional interpretation | constitutional interpretation | legislative processes | legislative processes | presidential power | presidential power | public opinion and voting | public opinion and voting | group mobilization | group mobilization | political steering of the bureaucracy and the economy | and federalism | political steering of the bureaucracy and the economy | and federalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

Supreme Court | Congress | constitutional law | racial profiling | wartime | affirmative action | constitutionality | civil rights | civil liberties | roe | wade | economic liberties | desegregation | gender discrimination | gay marriage | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | federalism | separation of powers | supreme court cases | marbury | madison | mccullough | maryland | bush | gore | dred scott | sanford | brown | board of education | equal protection of the laws | immigration | welfare | Eighth Amendment | First Amendment | poverty | criminal procedure | World War II | Korean War | post 9/11 america | judicial review | religion | citizenship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

Supreme Court | Congress | constitutional law | racial profiling | wartime | affirmative action | constitutionality | civil rights | civil liberties | roe | wade | economic liberties | desegregation | gender discrimination | gay marriage | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | federalism | separation of powers | supreme court cases | marbury | madison | mccullough | maryland | bush | gore | dred scott | sanford | brown | board of education | equal protection of the laws | immigration | welfare | Eighth Amendment | First Amendment | poverty | criminal procedure | World War II | Korean War | post 9/11 america | judicial review | religion | citizenship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

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