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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics. This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | twentieth-century Americans | twentieth-century Americans | 20th century | 20th century | good lif | good lif | leisure | leisure | material abundance | material abundance | department stores | department stores | advertising | advertising | mass-produced cars | mass-produced cars | suburbs | suburbs | American economy | American economy | American society | American society | American politics | American politics | mass market | mass market | turn of the century | turn of the century | middle-class society | middle-class society | interwar America | interwar America | mass culture | mass culture | postwar America | postwar America | conspicuous consumption | conspicuous consumption | good life | good life | cars | cars | automobiles | automobiles | vehicles | vehicles | window | window | storefront | storefront | store | store | shop | shop | showroom | showroom | dealers | dealers | dealership | dealership

License

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4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT)

Description

4.42J (or 2.66J or 1.044J), Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture, and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. It provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. Throughout the course, the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced.  Two design projects play a major part in this class. They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem, relating to energy consumption in buildings. The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ 4.42J (or 2.66J or 1.044J), Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture, and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. It provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. Throughout the course, the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced.  Two design projects play a major part in this class. They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem, relating to energy consumption in buildings. The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ

Subjects

energy in buildings | energy in buildings | thermo-sciences | thermo-sciences | energy | energy | ventilation | ventilation | air conditioning and comfort in buildings | air conditioning and comfort in buildings | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | electricity | electricity | architecture | architecture | building technology | building technology | civil engineering | civil engineering | buildings | buildings | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | air-water vapor mixtures | air-water vapor mixtures | thermal comfort | thermal comfort | heat pumps | heat pumps | refrigeration cycles | refrigeration cycles | thermodynamic performance | thermodynamic performance | heat transfer | heat transfer | creative design projects | creative design projects | air conditioning | air conditioning | energy consumption | energy consumption | building designs | building designs | building technologies | building technologies | operating schemes | operating schemes | properties of gases | properties of gases | properties of liquids | properties of liquids | power producing systems | power producing systems | energy losses | energy losses | building envelope | building envelope | 4.42 | 4.42 | 1.044 | 1.044 | 2.66 | 2.66

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance. This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | advertising | advertising | status | status | American Dream | American Dream | mass-market | mass-market | suburbs | suburbs | e-commerce | e-commerce | fast food | fast food

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ESD.36J System and Project Management (MIT) ESD.36J System and Project Management (MIT)

Description

The course is designed for students in the System Design and Management (SDM) program and therefore assumes that you already have a basic knowledge of project management. The objective is to introduce advanced methods and tools of project management in a realistic context such that they can be taken back to the workplace to improve management of development projects. In contrast to traditional courses on the subject we will emphasize scenarios that cannot be fully predicted such as task iterations, unplanned rework, perceived versus actual progress and misalignments between tasks, product architectures and organizations. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.615J. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanica The course is designed for students in the System Design and Management (SDM) program and therefore assumes that you already have a basic knowledge of project management. The objective is to introduce advanced methods and tools of project management in a realistic context such that they can be taken back to the workplace to improve management of development projects. In contrast to traditional courses on the subject we will emphasize scenarios that cannot be fully predicted such as task iterations, unplanned rework, perceived versus actual progress and misalignments between tasks, product architectures and organizations. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.615J. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanica

Subjects

system and project management | system and project management | product development | product development | PERT | PERT | CPM | CPM | design structure matrix | design structure matrix | DSM | DSM | system dynamics | system dynamics | SD | SD | SPM | SPM | product development process | product development process | PDP | PDP | concurrent engineering | concurrent engineering | project monitoring | project monitoring | resource consumption | resource consumption | critical paths | critical paths | project progress | project progress | corrective action | corrective action | system dynamics models | system dynamics models | ESD.36 | ESD.36 | 1.432 | 1.432

License

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21H.927J The Economic History of Work and Family (MIT) 21H.927J The Economic History of Work and Family (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the relation of women and men in both pre-industrial and modern societies to the changing map of public and private (household) work spaces, examining how that map affected their opportunities for both productive activity and the consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, will be the third major theme of the course. We will consider how a place and an ideal of the "domestic" arose in the early modern west, to what extent it was effective in limiting the economic position of women, and how it has been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period. Finally, we will consider some of the policy implications for contemporary societies as they respond This course will explore the relation of women and men in both pre-industrial and modern societies to the changing map of public and private (household) work spaces, examining how that map affected their opportunities for both productive activity and the consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, will be the third major theme of the course. We will consider how a place and an ideal of the "domestic" arose in the early modern west, to what extent it was effective in limiting the economic position of women, and how it has been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period. Finally, we will consider some of the policy implications for contemporary societies as they respond

Subjects

21H.927 | 21H.927 | WGS.610 | WGS.610 | History | History | economics | economics | work | work | family | family | women | women | men | men | pre-industrial | pre-industrial | modern | modern | societies | societies | public | public | private | private | household | household | work spaces | work spaces | map | map | consumption | consumption | goods | goods | leisure | leisure | reproductive strategies | reproductive strategies | domestic | domestic | policy | policy | work force | work force | demographic | demographic | western Europe | western Europe | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | United States | United States | non-western cultures | non-western cultures

License

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14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT) 14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. Topics include the basic model or the consumption/saving choice, the RBC model or the labor/leisure choice, non-trivial investment decisions, two-good analysis, money, price setting, the "new Keynesian" model, monetary policy, and fiscal policy. This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. Topics include the basic model or the consumption/saving choice, the RBC model or the labor/leisure choice, non-trivial investment decisions, two-good analysis, money, price setting, the "new Keynesian" model, monetary policy, and fiscal policy.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | theory | theory | fluctuations | fluctuations | the basic model | the basic model | consumption/saving choice | consumption/saving choice | the RBC model | the RBC model | the labor/leisure choice | the labor/leisure choice | non-trivial investment decisions | non-trivial investment decisions | two-good analysis | two-good analysis | money | money | price setting | price setting | the ?new Keynesian? model | the ?new Keynesian? model | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy

License

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Environmental Issues in Materials Selection (MIT) Environmental Issues in Materials Selection (MIT)

Description

Choice of material has implications throughout the life-cycle of a product, influencing many aspects of economic and environmental performance. This course will provide a survey of methods for evaluating those implications. Lectures will cover topics in material choice concepts, fundamentals of engineering economics, manufacturing economics modeling methods, and life-cycle environmental evaluation. Choice of material has implications throughout the life-cycle of a product, influencing many aspects of economic and environmental performance. This course will provide a survey of methods for evaluating those implications. Lectures will cover topics in material choice concepts, fundamentals of engineering economics, manufacturing economics modeling methods, and life-cycle environmental evaluation.

Subjects

cost | cost | value | value | cash flow | cash flow | discount | discount | life-cycle | life-cycle | engineering economics | engineering economics | manufacturing economics | manufacturing economics | LCA | LCA | life-cycle assessment | life-cycle assessment | PCBM | PCBM | process-based cost modeling | process-based cost modeling | cost model | cost model | environmental impact | environmental impact | uncertainty | uncertainty | consumption | consumption | efficiency | efficiency | waste | waste | Ashby | Ashby

License

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PE.210 SCUBA (MIT) PE.210 SCUBA (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element video. This course will thoroughly educate the successful student with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a certified beginning SCUBA diver. The prerequisite for the course is passing the MIT SCUBA swim test and demonstrating a "comfort level" in the water. At the end of the class, students will attempt to pass the certification exam to become certified divers. The class is taught in two parts each week: a classroom session and a pool session. The classroom sessions along with the reading material will provide the student with the knowledge necessary to pass the written exam. At the pool, the water skills are taught in progressions that build on the previous skills, making the difficult skills seem easy. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element video. This course will thoroughly educate the successful student with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a certified beginning SCUBA diver. The prerequisite for the course is passing the MIT SCUBA swim test and demonstrating a "comfort level" in the water. At the end of the class, students will attempt to pass the certification exam to become certified divers. The class is taught in two parts each week: a classroom session and a pool session. The classroom sessions along with the reading material will provide the student with the knowledge necessary to pass the written exam. At the pool, the water skills are taught in progressions that build on the previous skills, making the difficult skills seem easy.

Subjects

SCUBA | SCUBA | diving | diving | physics | physics | water | water | ocean | ocean | neutral buoyancy | neutral buoyancy | regulator | regulator | decompression | decompression | rescue | rescue | swim techniques | swim techniques | kick cycles | kick cycles | marine life | marine life | ocean environment | ocean environment | navigation | navigation | dive tables | dive tables | air consumption | air consumption | snorkeling | snorkeling | skin diving | skin diving | NAUI | NAUI

License

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance. This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | advertising | advertising | status | status | American Dream | American Dream | mass-market | mass-market | suburbs | suburbs | e-commerce | e-commerce | fast food | fast food

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT) 10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

Assessment of current and potential future energy systems, covering extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a more sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Open to graduate students and upper-class undergraduates. Assessment of current and potential future energy systems, covering extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a more sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Open to graduate students and upper-class undergraduates.

Subjects

renewable energy | renewable energy | conservation | conservation | alternative power | alternative power | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | efficiency | efficiency | system analysis | system analysis | greenhouse | greenhouse | consumption | consumption | fuel | fuel | resource allocation | resource allocation | 10.391 | 10.391 | 1.818 | 1.818 | 2.65 | 2.65 | 3.564 | 3.564 | 11.371 | 11.371 | 22.811 | 22.811 | ESD.166 | ESD.166

License

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14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT) 14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. Topics include the basic model or the consumption/saving choice, the RBC model or the labor/leisure choice, non-trivial investment decisions, two-good analysis, money, price setting, the "new Keynesian" model, monetary policy, and fiscal policy. This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. Topics include the basic model or the consumption/saving choice, the RBC model or the labor/leisure choice, non-trivial investment decisions, two-good analysis, money, price setting, the "new Keynesian" model, monetary policy, and fiscal policy.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | theory | theory | fluctuations | fluctuations | the basic model | the basic model | consumption/saving choice | consumption/saving choice | the RBC model | the RBC model | the labor/leisure choice | the labor/leisure choice | non-trivial investment decisions | non-trivial investment decisions | two-good analysis | two-good analysis | money | money | price setting | price setting | the ?new Keynesian? model | the ?new Keynesian? model | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.05 Intermediate Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.05 Intermediate Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course uses the tools of macroeconomics to study various macroeconomic policy problems in-depth. The problems range from economic growth in the long run, to government finances in the intermediate run, and economic stability in the short run. Many economic models used today are surveyed. This course uses the tools of macroeconomics to study various macroeconomic policy problems in-depth. The problems range from economic growth in the long run, to government finances in the intermediate run, and economic stability in the short run. Many economic models used today are surveyed.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | Solow Model | Solow Model | consumption | consumption | saving | saving | labor supply | labor supply | Ramsey model | Ramsey model | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | policy | policy | economics | economics | financial crisis | financial crisis

License

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14.453 Macroeconomic Theory III (MIT) 14.453 Macroeconomic Theory III (MIT)

Description

This course covers issues in the theory of consumption, investment and asset prices. We lay out the basic models first, and then examine the empirical facts that motivate extensions to these models. This course covers issues in the theory of consumption, investment and asset prices. We lay out the basic models first, and then examine the empirical facts that motivate extensions to these models.

Subjects

Macroeconomic theory | Macroeconomic theory | consumption and savings decisions under certainty and uncertainty | consumption and savings decisions under certainty and uncertainty | aggregate savings | aggregate savings | wealth | wealth | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | portfolio choice | portfolio choice | asset pricing | asset pricing | investment and finance decisions | investment and finance decisions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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PE.210 SCUBA (MIT) PE.210 SCUBA (MIT)

Description

This course will thoroughly educate the successful student with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a certified beginning SCUBA diver. The prerequisite for the course is passing the MIT SCUBA swim test and demonstrating a "comfort level" in the water. At the end of the class, students will attempt to pass the certification exam to become certified divers. The class is taught in two parts each week: a classroom session and a pool session. The classroom sessions along with the reading material will provide the student with the knowledge necessary to pass the written exam. At the pool, the water skills are taught in progressions that build on the previous skills, making the difficult skills seem easy. This course will thoroughly educate the successful student with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a certified beginning SCUBA diver. The prerequisite for the course is passing the MIT SCUBA swim test and demonstrating a "comfort level" in the water. At the end of the class, students will attempt to pass the certification exam to become certified divers. The class is taught in two parts each week: a classroom session and a pool session. The classroom sessions along with the reading material will provide the student with the knowledge necessary to pass the written exam. At the pool, the water skills are taught in progressions that build on the previous skills, making the difficult skills seem easy.

Subjects

SCUBA | SCUBA | diving | diving | physics | physics | water | water | ocean | ocean | neutral buoyancy | neutral buoyancy | regulator | regulator | decompression | decompression | rescue | rescue | swim techniques | swim techniques | kick cycles | kick cycles | marine life | marine life | ocean environment | ocean environment | navigation | navigation | dive tables | dive tables | air consumption | air consumption | snorkeling | snorkeling | skin diving | skin diving | NAUI | NAUI

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT) 14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. The course is organized around nine topics/sections: Fluctuations and Facts; The basic model: the consumption/saving choice; Allowing for a labor/leisure choice (the RBC model); Allowing for non trivial investment decisions; Allowing for two goods; Introducing money; Introducing price setting; Introducing staggering of price decisions; and Applications to fiscal and monetary policy. This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. The course is organized around nine topics/sections: Fluctuations and Facts; The basic model: the consumption/saving choice; Allowing for a labor/leisure choice (the RBC model); Allowing for non trivial investment decisions; Allowing for two goods; Introducing money; Introducing price setting; Introducing staggering of price decisions; and Applications to fiscal and monetary policy.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | fluctuations | fluctuations | consumption | consumption | saving | saving | choice | choice | labor | labor | leisure | leisure | RBC model | RBC model | non trivial investment decisions | non trivial investment decisions | money | money | price setting | price setting | staggering price decisions | staggering price decisions | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | monetary policy. | monetary policy. | monetary policy | monetary policy

License

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STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT) STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT)

Description

In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist

Subjects

History | History | food | food | analysis | analysis | transform | transform | technological innovations | technological innovations | preserve | preserve | surplus | surplus | drying | drying | freezing | freezing | canning | canning | salting | salting | travel | travel | space | space | lived | lived | relations | relations | neighbors | neighbors | relatives | relatives | economic order | economic order | capitalism | capitalism | preservation | preservation | development | development | cultural | cultural | political | political | economic | economic | techno-scientific history | techno-scientific history | mass-production techniques | mass-production techniques | industrial farming initiatives | industrial farming initiatives | consumption | consumption | vertical integration | vertical integration | business firms | business firms | globalization | globalization | race | race | gender identities | gender identities | labor movements | labor movements | America | America

License

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14.06 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (MIT) 14.06 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of modern macroeconomics at a quite advanced level. Topics include the neoclassical growth model, overlapping generations, endogenous growth models, business cycles, incomplete nominal adjustment, incomplete financial markets, fiscal and monetary policy, consumption and savings, and unemployment. The course is also an introduction to the mathematical tools used in modern macroeconomics, including dynamic systems, optimal control, and dynamic programming. This course is a survey of modern macroeconomics at a quite advanced level. Topics include the neoclassical growth model, overlapping generations, endogenous growth models, business cycles, incomplete nominal adjustment, incomplete financial markets, fiscal and monetary policy, consumption and savings, and unemployment. The course is also an introduction to the mathematical tools used in modern macroeconomics, including dynamic systems, optimal control, and dynamic programming.

Subjects

advanced macroeconomics | advanced macroeconomics | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | neoclassical theory | neoclassical theory | new growth theory | new growth theory | consumption | consumption | saving behavior | saving behavior | investment | investment | unemployment | unemployment | financial markets | financial markets | asset pricing | asset pricing | public finance | public finance | externalities | externalities | research and development | research and development | innovation | innovation | business cycles | business cycles | nominal adjustment | nominal adjustment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT) 14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process. This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | heuristics | heuristics | noise | noise | confusion | confusion | competition | competition | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | games | games | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | consumption | hyperbolics | hyperbolics | temptation | temptation | assets | assets | puzzles | puzzles | bubbles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.06 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (MIT) 14.06 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of modern macroeconomics at a fairly advanced level. Topics include neoclassical and new& growth theory, consumption and saving behavior, investment, and unemployment. It also includes use of the dynamic programming techniques. Assignments include problem sets and written discussions of macroeconomic events. This course is recommended for students planning to apply to graduate school in economics. This course is a survey of modern macroeconomics at a fairly advanced level. Topics include neoclassical and new& growth theory, consumption and saving behavior, investment, and unemployment. It also includes use of the dynamic programming techniques. Assignments include problem sets and written discussions of macroeconomic events. This course is recommended for students planning to apply to graduate school in economics.

Subjects

advanced macroeconomics | advanced macroeconomics | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | neoclassical and new growth theory | neoclassical and new growth theory | consumption and saving behavior | consumption and saving behavior | investment | investment | unemployment | unemployment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.942 Regional Energy-Environmental Economic Modeling (MIT) 11.942 Regional Energy-Environmental Economic Modeling (MIT)

Description

This subject is on regional energy-environmental modeling rather than on general energy-environmental policies, but the models should have some policy relevance. We will start with some discussion of green accounting issues; then, we will cover a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to spatial energy demand and supply, energy forecasts, national and regional energy prices, and environmental implications of regional energy consumption and production. Where feasible, the topics will have a spatial dimension. This is a new seminar, so we expect students to contribute material to the set of readings and topics covered during the semester. This subject is on regional energy-environmental modeling rather than on general energy-environmental policies, but the models should have some policy relevance. We will start with some discussion of green accounting issues; then, we will cover a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to spatial energy demand and supply, energy forecasts, national and regional energy prices, and environmental implications of regional energy consumption and production. Where feasible, the topics will have a spatial dimension. This is a new seminar, so we expect students to contribute material to the set of readings and topics covered during the semester.

Subjects

regional energy environmental modeling | regional energy environmental modeling | policies | policies | microeconomics | microeconomics | economic modeling | economic modeling | economic modeling techniques | economic modeling techniques | input-output | input-output | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | linear programming | linear programming | logit | logit | regression | regression | green accounting | green accounting | spatial energy demand | spatial energy demand | spatial energy supply | spatial energy supply | energy forecast | energy forecast | regional energy prices | regional energy prices | regional energy consumption | regional energy consumption | regional energy production | regional energy production

License

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrial ized nations | industrial ized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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TALAT Lecture 2110.01: Automobile brake rotor - LCA in product design

Description

This lecture imparts knowledge about ?production and casting of SiC-particle reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite - PMMC (SiCAl7SiMg); use of Life Cycle Analysis. It provides insight to how to redesign a product using life cycle thinking and LCA to minimize the ecological side effects; the importance of having a thoroughly knowledge about the product's life and its environmental impact. Some knowledge of the concept of the product information structure - "the chromosomes" and familiarity with LCA methodology is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | EAA | Training in Aluminium Application Technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | design | product | automobile brake system | topological structure | wheel design | brake rotor | calliper | specifications | PMMC | environmental performance | particle reinforced aluminium | production | casting | life cycle analysis | energy consumption | material consumption | safety | pollution | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrialized nations | industrialized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business | aging | aging | population | population | countries | countries | developing | developing | development | development | industrial | industrial | industrialized | industrialized | nations | nations | politics | politics | political | political | theory | theory | sustainable | sustainable | public | public | policy | policy | sustainability | sustainability | economies | economies | transition | transition | growth | growth | institutions | institutions | institutional | institutional | trade | trade | international | international

License

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21H.S01 Food in American History (MIT) 21H.S01 Food in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will explore food in modern American history as a story of industrialization and globalization. Lectures, readings, and discussions will emphasize the historical dimensions of—and debates about—slave plantations and factory farm labor; industrial processing and technologies of food preservation; the political economy and ecology of global commodity chains; the vagaries of nutritional science; food restrictions and reform movements; food surpluses and famines; cooking traditions and innovations; the emergence of restaurants, supermarkets, fast food, and slow food. The core concern of the course will be to understand the increasingly pervasive influence of the American model of food production and consumption patterns. This course will explore food in modern American history as a story of industrialization and globalization. Lectures, readings, and discussions will emphasize the historical dimensions of—and debates about—slave plantations and factory farm labor; industrial processing and technologies of food preservation; the political economy and ecology of global commodity chains; the vagaries of nutritional science; food restrictions and reform movements; food surpluses and famines; cooking traditions and innovations; the emergence of restaurants, supermarkets, fast food, and slow food. The core concern of the course will be to understand the increasingly pervasive influence of the American model of food production and consumption patterns.

Subjects

food | food | American history | American history | industrialization | industrialization | globalization | globalization | slavery | slavery | plantations | plantations | farms | farms | labor | labor | processing | processing | preservation | preservation | economy | economy | chains | chains | nutrition | nutrition | nutritional science | nutritional science | food restrictions | food restrictions | surplus | surplus | famine | famine | cooking | cooking | restaurants | restaurants | supermarkets | supermarkets | fast food | fast food | slow food | slow food | production | production | consumption | consumption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics (MIT)

Description

8.01 is a first-semester freshman physics class in Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory. In addition to the basic concepts of Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory, a variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Binary Stars, Neutron Stars, Black Holes, Resonance Phenomena, Musical Instruments, Stellar Collapse, Supernovae, Astronomical observations from very high flying balloons (lecture 35), and you will be allowed a peek into the intriguing Quantum World. Also by Walter Lewin Courses: Electricity and Magnetism (8.02) - with a complete set of 36 video lectures from the Spring of 2002 Vibrations and Waves (8.03) - with a complete set of 23 video lectures from the Fall of 2004 Talks: For The Love Of Physics - Profes

Subjects

units of measurement | powers of ten | dimensional analysis | measurement uncertainty | scaling arguments | velocity | speed | acceleration | acceleration of gravity | vectors | motion | vector product | scalar product | projectiles | projectile trajectory | circular motion | centripetal motion | artifical gravity | force | Newton's Three Laws | eight | weightlessness | tension | friction | frictionless forces | static friction | dot products | cross products | kinematics | springs | pendulum | mechanical energy | kinetic energy | universal gravitation | resistive force | drag force | air drag | viscous terminal velocity | potential energy | heat; energy consumption | heat | energy consumption | collisions | center of mass | momentum | Newton's Cradle | impulse and impact | rocket thrust | rocket velocity | flywheels | inertia | torque | spinning rod | elliptical orbits | Kepler's Laws | Doppler shift | stellar dynamics | sound waves | electromagnets | binary star | black holes | rope tension | elasticity | speed of sound | pressure in fluid | Pascal's Principle | hydrostatic pressure | barometric pressure | submarines | buoyant force | Bernoulli's Equations | Archimede's Principle | floating | baloons | resonance | wind instruments | thermal expansion | shrink fitting | particles and waves | diffraction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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