Searching for contemporary : 185 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT) 17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China. This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China.

Subjects

theoretical and methodological approaches | theoretical and methodological approaches | contemporary Chinese politics | contemporary Chinese politics | broader trends | broader trends | omparative politics | omparative politics | effective ways to integrate area studies | effective ways to integrate area studies | broader comparative approaches | broader comparative approaches | history and politics of contemporary China | history and politics of contemporary China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT) 17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China. This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China.

Subjects

theoretical and methodological approaches | theoretical and methodological approaches | contemporary Chinese politics | contemporary Chinese politics | broader trends | broader trends | omparative politics | omparative politics | effective ways to integrate area studies | effective ways to integrate area studies | broader comparative approaches | broader comparative approaches | history and politics of contemporary China | history and politics of contemporary China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

British public policy British public policy

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. The aim of this module is to analyse and explain the changing nature of policy-making in contemporary Britain, with particular emphasis on the period since 1979. Specifically, the module examines the impact of new forms of 'governance' on the policy-making process and the changing roles and responsibilities of the British state. Taking the alleged shift from an era of 'government' to one of 'governance', and thence to an era of 'joined up government' as its central theme, the module interrogates key controversies in contemporary British political science. Examples here include the impact of 'governance', of New Right ideology, of Europeanization and of global This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. The aim of this module is to analyse and explain the changing nature of policy-making in contemporary Britain, with particular emphasis on the period since 1979. Specifically, the module examines the impact of new forms of 'governance' on the policy-making process and the changing roles and responsibilities of the British state. Taking the alleged shift from an era of 'government' to one of 'governance', and thence to an era of 'joined up government' as its central theme, the module interrogates key controversies in contemporary British political science. Examples here include the impact of 'governance', of New Right ideology, of Europeanization and of global

Subjects

UNow | UNow | M13045 | M13045 | ukoer | ukoer | policy-making in contemporary Britain | policy-making in contemporary Britain | new forms of governance | new forms of governance | policy-making process | policy-making process | the British state | the British state | government | government | joined up government | joined up government | contemporary British political science | contemporary British political science | New Right ideology | New Right ideology

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.730 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Social and Ethical Issues (MIT) 21W.730 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Social and Ethical Issues (MIT)

Description

This course provides the opportunity for students-as readers, viewers, writers and speakers-to engage with social and ethical issues they care deeply about. Over the course of the semester, through discussing the writing of classic and contemporary authors, we will explore different perspectives on a range of social issues such as free speech, poverty and homelessness, mental illness, capital punishment and racial and gender inequality. In addition, we will analyze selected documentary and feature films and photographs that represent or dramatize social problems or issues. In assigned essays, students will have the opportunity to write about social and ethical issues of their own choice. This course aims to help students to grow significantly in their ability to understand and grappl This course provides the opportunity for students-as readers, viewers, writers and speakers-to engage with social and ethical issues they care deeply about. Over the course of the semester, through discussing the writing of classic and contemporary authors, we will explore different perspectives on a range of social issues such as free speech, poverty and homelessness, mental illness, capital punishment and racial and gender inequality. In addition, we will analyze selected documentary and feature films and photographs that represent or dramatize social problems or issues. In assigned essays, students will have the opportunity to write about social and ethical issues of their own choice. This course aims to help students to grow significantly in their ability to understand and grappl

Subjects

Writing on contemporary issues | Writing on contemporary issues | social issues | social issues | ethical issues | ethical issues | contemporary | contemporary | culture | culture | culture shock | culture shock | urban and environmental crises | urban and environmental crises | issues of race and gender | issues of race and gender | media saturation | media saturation | language and representation | language and representation | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | uncertainty | uncertainty | confusion | confusion | assimilating | assimilating | assimilation | assimilation | current | current

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT) 21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience—specifically, prose that is both critical and personal, that features your ideas, your perspective, and your voice to engage readers. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that critically engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of pieces that address current issues in popular culture. These readings will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal, attending always to the ways yo This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience—specifically, prose that is both critical and personal, that features your ideas, your perspective, and your voice to engage readers. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that critically engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of pieces that address current issues in popular culture. These readings will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal, attending always to the ways yo

Subjects

contemporary | contemporary | contemporary issues | contemporary issues | culture | culture | culture shock | culture shock | urban and environmental crises | urban and environmental crises | economic imperialism | economic imperialism | sexual and reproductive politics | sexual and reproductive politics | the ethics of biotechnologies | the ethics of biotechnologies | issues of race and gender | issues of race and gender | the romance of technology | the romance of technology | robotics and cyborg cultures | robotics and cyborg cultures | media saturation | media saturation | language and representation | language and representation | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | Honeymoon Phase | Honeymoon Phase | Negotiation Phase | Negotiation Phase | Adjustment Phase | Adjustment Phase | Reverse Culture Shock | Reverse Culture Shock | anxiety | anxiety | feelings | feelings | surprise | surprise | disorientation | disorientation | uncertainty | uncertainty | confusion | confusion | assimilating | assimilating | current | current

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT) 21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course covers techniques of creating narratives that take advantage of the flexibility of form offered by the computer. The course studies the structural properties of book-based narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time and of storyline. The class analyzes the structure and evaluates the literary qualities of computer-based narratives including hypertexts, adventure games, and classic artificial intelligence programs like Eliza. With this base, students use authoring systems to model a variety of narrative techniques and to create their own fictions. Knowledge of programming is helpful but not necessary. This course covers techniques of creating narratives that take advantage of the flexibility of form offered by the computer. The course studies the structural properties of book-based narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time and of storyline. The class analyzes the structure and evaluates the literary qualities of computer-based narratives including hypertexts, adventure games, and classic artificial intelligence programs like Eliza. With this base, students use authoring systems to model a variety of narrative techniques and to create their own fictions. Knowledge of programming is helpful but not necessary.

Subjects

multi-linear narrative | multi-linear narrative | nonlinear narrative | nonlinear narrative | digital | digital | media | media | communication culture | communication culture | gaming | gaming | television | television | digital aesthetics | digital aesthetics | contemporary art | contemporary art | film | film | synchronic narrative | synchronic narrative | contemporary media | contemporary media | digital narrative | digital narrative | video games | video games | game culture platforms | game culture platforms | Second Life | Second Life | LARP | LARP | ARG | ARG | MMO | MMO | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489 | CMS.845 | CMS.845

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT) 21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons. The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | globalization | society | society | geography | geography | america | america | europe | europe | asia | asia | africa | africa | third worrld | third worrld | development | development | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | religion | religion | politics | politics | youth | youth | developing nation | developing nation | first world | first world | cosmopolitan culture | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | global youth culture | religious movements | religious movements | social movements | social movements | political movements | political movements | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | political cartoons | political cartoons | Japan | Japan | popular culture | popular culture | world hip-hop | world hip-hop | rap | rap | media power | media power | consumer activism | consumer activism | third world | third world | 21F.035 | 21F.035 | 21F.037 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.730 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Social and Ethical Issues (MIT) 21W.730 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Social and Ethical Issues (MIT)

Description

This course provides the opportunity for students-as readers, viewers, writers and speakers-to engage with social and ethical issues they care deeply about. Over the course of the semester, through discussing the writing of classic and contemporary authors, we will explore different perspectives on a range of social issues such as free speech, poverty and homelessness, mental illness, capital punishment and racial and gender inequality. In addition, we will analyze selected documentary and feature films and photographs that represent or dramatize social problems or issues. In assigned essays, students will have the opportunity to write about social and ethical issues of their own choice. This course aims to help students to grow significantly in their ability to understand and grappl This course provides the opportunity for students-as readers, viewers, writers and speakers-to engage with social and ethical issues they care deeply about. Over the course of the semester, through discussing the writing of classic and contemporary authors, we will explore different perspectives on a range of social issues such as free speech, poverty and homelessness, mental illness, capital punishment and racial and gender inequality. In addition, we will analyze selected documentary and feature films and photographs that represent or dramatize social problems or issues. In assigned essays, students will have the opportunity to write about social and ethical issues of their own choice. This course aims to help students to grow significantly in their ability to understand and grappl

Subjects

Writing on contemporary issues | Writing on contemporary issues | social issues | social issues | ethical issues | ethical issues | contemporary | contemporary | culture | culture | culture shock | culture shock | urban and environmental crises | urban and environmental crises | issues of race and gender | issues of race and gender | media saturation | media saturation | language and representation | language and representation | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | uncertainty | uncertainty | confusion | confusion | assimilating | assimilating | assimilation | assimilation | current | current

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Culture (MIT) Culture (MIT)

Description

Prepares students for working and living in German-speaking countries. Focus on current political, social, and cultural issues, using newspapers, journals, TV, radio broadcasts, and Web sources from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Emphasis on speaking, writing, and reading skills for professional contexts. Activities include: oral presentations, group discussions, guest lectures, and interviews with German speakers. No listeners. Prepares students for working and living in German-speaking countries. Focus on current political, social, and cultural issues, using newspapers, journals, TV, radio broadcasts, and Web sources from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Emphasis on speaking, writing, and reading skills for professional contexts. Activities include: oral presentations, group discussions, guest lectures, and interviews with German speakers. No listeners.

Subjects

german | german | switzerland | switzerland | austria | austria | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | politics | politics | society | society | speaking | speaking | reading | reading | writing | writing | literature | literature | language | language | media | media | intermediate | intermediate

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT) 24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally. The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | problems | problems | philosophers | philosophers | think | think | existence | existence | God | God | reason | reason | faith | faith | mind-body | mind-body | freewill | freewill | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | standards | standards | moral conduct | moral conduct | history | history | contemporary authors | contemporary authors | skills | skills | critical | critical | argumentative | argumentative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches.

Subjects

history | history | theory | theory | method | method | contemporary | contemporary | twentieth century | twentieth century | social history | social history | economics | economics | primary source | primary source | narrative | narrative | analysis | analysis | cultural history | cultural history | 20th century | 20th century | Annales school | Annales school | agrarian history | agrarian history | class | class | race | race | gender | gender | historical categories | historical categories | historical demography | historical demography | new economic history | new economic history | military history | military history | environmental history | environmental history | film | film | Europe | Europe | America | America | Asia | Asia | primary sources | primary sources | 21H.991 | 21H.991 | STS.210 | STS.210

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.780 Communicating in Technical Organizations (MIT) 21W.780 Communicating in Technical Organizations (MIT)

Description

This class offers students an opportunity to experiment with various forms and practices of cellphone communication and, most importantly, to propose and develop a semester-long project using advanced A780 cellphones donated by Motorola along with access to J2ME™ source code for programming cellphone applications. Class size is limited. Students in small collaborative groups will propose, implement and report on a semester-long project. This class offers students an opportunity to experiment with various forms and practices of cellphone communication and, most importantly, to propose and develop a semester-long project using advanced A780 cellphones donated by Motorola along with access to J2ME™ source code for programming cellphone applications. Class size is limited. Students in small collaborative groups will propose, implement and report on a semester-long project.

Subjects

communication | communication | contemporary engineering and science professional | contemporary engineering and science professional | analyzing how composition and publication contribute to work management and knowledge production | analyzing how composition and publication contribute to work management and knowledge production | writing specific kinds of documents in a clear style | writing specific kinds of documents in a clear style | communication as organizational process | communication as organizational process | electronic modes such as e-mail and the Internet | electronic modes such as e-mail and the Internet | the informational and social roles of specific document forms | the informational and social roles of specific document forms | writing as collaboration | writing as collaboration | the writing process | the writing process | the elements of style | the elements of style | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | case studies | case studies | writing assignments | writing assignments | oral presentation | oral presentation | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Neurotransmitters (MIT) Neurotransmitters (MIT)

Description

Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation. Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation.

Subjects

brain | brain | cultural object | cultural object | contemporary media | contemporary media | science | science | society | society | cultural assumptions | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | neuroscience | anthropology | anthropology | history | history | semiotics | semiotics | cognitive sciences | cognitive sciences | historical views | historical views | digital images | digital images | psychopharmacology | psychopharmacology | mental illness | mental illness | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | brain science | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

MAS.110 Fundamentals of Computational Media Design (MIT) MAS.110 Fundamentals of Computational Media Design (MIT)

Description

This class introduces principles of analysis and synthesis in the computational medium. Expressive examples that illustrate the intersection of computation with the traditional arts are developed on a weekly basis. Hands-on design exercises are continually framed and examined in the larger context of contemporary digital art. This class introduces principles of analysis and synthesis in the computational medium. Expressive examples that illustrate the intersection of computation with the traditional arts are developed on a weekly basis. Hands-on design exercises are continually framed and examined in the larger context of contemporary digital art.

Subjects

analysis | analysis | synthesis | synthesis | computational media | computational media | computational and traditional arts | computational and traditional arts | design | design | programming | programming | javascript | javascript | contemporary digital art | contemporary digital art | machine age | machine age | media design | media design | analog vs digital art | analog vs digital art | graphic design | graphic design | web design | web design | photography | photography | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | computation | computation | arts | arts | design exercises | design exercises | studio | studio | analog art | analog art

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience - specifically, prose grounded in, though not confined to, personal narrative and perspective. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience - specifically, prose grounded in, though not confined to, personal narrative and perspective. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence.

Subjects

public audience | public audience | personal narrative | personal narrative | perspective | perspective | American popular culture | American popular culture | personal voice | personal voice | presence | presence | contemporary America | contemporary America | online magazine | online magazine | memoir | memoir | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.730-1 Imagining the Future (MIT) 21W.730-1 Imagining the Future (MIT)

Description

Turn-of-the-century eras have historically been times when people are more than usually inclined to scrutinize the present and speculate about the future. Now, the turn not just of a century but of a millennium having recently passed, such scrutiny and speculations inevitably intensify. What will the future that awaits us in this twenty-first century and beyond be like? And how do visions of that future reflect and respond to the world we live in now? In this writing course we will read and write about how some twentieth-century writers and filmmakers have attended to the present as a way of imagining -- and warning about -- possible worlds to come. Guided by our reading and discussion, we will scrutinize our own present and construct our own visions of the future through close readings of Turn-of-the-century eras have historically been times when people are more than usually inclined to scrutinize the present and speculate about the future. Now, the turn not just of a century but of a millennium having recently passed, such scrutiny and speculations inevitably intensify. What will the future that awaits us in this twenty-first century and beyond be like? And how do visions of that future reflect and respond to the world we live in now? In this writing course we will read and write about how some twentieth-century writers and filmmakers have attended to the present as a way of imagining -- and warning about -- possible worlds to come. Guided by our reading and discussion, we will scrutinize our own present and construct our own visions of the future through close readings of

Subjects

Turn-of-the-century | Turn-of-the-century | eras | eras | present | present | future | future | millennium | millennium | twenty-first century | twenty-first century | visions | visions | imagination | imagination | world | world | writing | writing | read | read | twentieth-century | twentieth-century | writers | writers | filmmakers | filmmakers | imagining | imagining | warning | warning | discussion | discussion | contemporary | contemporary | culture | culture | urban | urban | environmental | environmental | crises | crises | economic | economic | imperialism | imperialism | sexual | sexual | reproductive | reproductive | politics | politics | race | race | gender | gender | romance | romance | technology | technology | robotics | robotics | cyborg | cyborg | media saturation | media saturation | language | language | representation | representation | human | human

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Culture (MIT) Culture (MIT)

Description

Prepares students for working and living in German-speaking countries. Focus on current political, social, and cultural issues, using newspapers, journals, TV, radio broadcasts, and Web sources from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Emphasis on speaking, writing, and reading skills for professional contexts. Activities include: oral presentations, group discussions, guest lectures, and interviews with German speakers. No listeners. Prepares students for working and living in German-speaking countries. Focus on current political, social, and cultural issues, using newspapers, journals, TV, radio broadcasts, and Web sources from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Emphasis on speaking, writing, and reading skills for professional contexts. Activities include: oral presentations, group discussions, guest lectures, and interviews with German speakers. No listeners.

Subjects

german | german | switzerland | switzerland | austria | austria | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | politics | politics | society | society | speaking | speaking | reading | reading | writing | writing | literature | literature | language | language | media | media | intermediate | intermediate

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.402 German II (MIT) 21G.402 German II (MIT)

Description

In this course students are exposed to history and culture of German-speaking countries through audio, video, and Web materials. It focuses on the expansion of basic communication skills and further development of linguistic competency, and includes the review and completion of basic grammar, building of vocabulary, and practice in writing short essays. Students will also read short literary texts. In this course students are exposed to history and culture of German-speaking countries through audio, video, and Web materials. It focuses on the expansion of basic communication skills and further development of linguistic competency, and includes the review and completion of basic grammar, building of vocabulary, and practice in writing short essays. Students will also read short literary texts.

Subjects

german | german | foreign language | foreign language | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | switzerland | switzerland | austria | austria | europe | europe | intermediate | intermediate | grammar | grammar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Sir Anthony Caro in conversation with Tim Marlow

Description

Wolfson College was privileged to welcome back esteemed honorary fellow Sir Anthony Caro on 2nd November, who, 'in conversation' with art historian Tim Marlow, recounted his fifty-year career as one of the key figures in contemporary sculpture. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art history | contemporary sculpture | art history | contemporary sculpture

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129040/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas. This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas.

Subjects

finite element methods | finite element methods | solids | solids | structures | structures | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | equilibrium equations | direct integration | direct integration | mode superposition | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | frequencies | mode shapes | mode shapes | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | wave propagation | Japan | Japan | politics | politics | policy | policy | contemporary Japan | contemporary Japan | electoral politics | electoral politics | interest group politics | interest group politics | party politics | party politics | bureaucratic politics | bureaucratic politics | social policy | social policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | defense policy | defense policy | energy policy | energy policy | science and technology policy | science and technology policy | industrial policy | industrial policy | trade policy | trade policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy: International Relations and Strategy (MIT) 17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy: International Relations and Strategy (MIT)

Description

China's rise as a great power raises important questions about how that power might be used in its relations with other states. Nowhere are such questions more salient than in the future trajectory of China's conflict behavior, including its approach to deterrence, crisis management and the use of force. To explore these important questions in China's international relations, this seminar examines the evolution of Chinese strategic thought, in primary sources as well as its reflection in the interactions among Chinese states and between China and other states. China's rise as a great power raises important questions about how that power might be used in its relations with other states. Nowhere are such questions more salient than in the future trajectory of China's conflict behavior, including its approach to deterrence, crisis management and the use of force. To explore these important questions in China's international relations, this seminar examines the evolution of Chinese strategic thought, in primary sources as well as its reflection in the interactions among Chinese states and between China and other states.

Subjects

China | China | strategy | strategy | military | military | mao zedong | mao zedong | the Art of War | the Art of War | ancient chinese thought | ancient chinese thought | conflict | conflict | international relations | international relations | foreign policy | foreign policy | modern China | modern China | contemporary China | contemporary China | chinese literature | chinese literature | Chinese military history | Chinese military history | Chinese intellectualy history | Chinese intellectualy history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT) 17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT)

Description

This lecture course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the international relations of the People’s Republic of China. China’s foreign relations during the Cold War as well as contemporary diplomatic, security and economic issues will be examined to identify and explain China’s foreign policy goals and their implementation since 1949. Throughout, this course will investigate the sources of conflict and cooperation in China’s behavior, assessing competing explanations for key events and policies. Readings will be drawn from political science, history, and international relations theory. This lecture course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the international relations of the People’s Republic of China. China’s foreign relations during the Cold War as well as contemporary diplomatic, security and economic issues will be examined to identify and explain China’s foreign policy goals and their implementation since 1949. Throughout, this course will investigate the sources of conflict and cooperation in China’s behavior, assessing competing explanations for key events and policies. Readings will be drawn from political science, history, and international relations theory.

Subjects

China | China | chinese | chinese | foreign | foreign | policy | policy | international relations | international relations | People?s Republic of China | People?s Republic of China | foreign relations | foreign relations | Cold War | Cold War | contemporary | contemporary | diplomatic | diplomatic | security | security | economic | economic | 1949 | 1949 | conflict | conflict | cooperation | cooperation | behavior | behavior | competing explanations | competing explanations | key events | key events | political science | political science | history | history | international relations theory | international relations theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT) 17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)

Description

This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After

Subjects

Political science | Political science | fundamental ideas | fundamental ideas | theories | theories | methods | methods | contemporary | contemporary | major books | major books | articles | articles | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | American | American | comparative politics | comparative politics | Rawls | Rawls | A Theory of Justice | A Theory of Justice | Hayek | Hayek | The Constitution of Liberty | The Constitution of Liberty | Arrow | Arrow | Social Choice and Individual Values | Social Choice and Individual Values | Olson | Olson | The Logic of Collective Action | The Logic of Collective Action | Waltz | Waltz | Theory of International Relations | Theory of International Relations | Bull | Bull | The Anarchical Society | The Anarchical Society | Foucault | Foucault | Discipline and Punish | Discipline and Punish | Elster | Elster | Cement of Society | Cement of Society | Keohane | Keohane | After Hegemony | After Hegemony | Allison | Allison | Zelikow | Zelikow | The Essence of Decision | The Essence of Decision | Doyle | Doyle | Kant | Kant | Liberal Legacies | Liberal Legacies | Foreign Affairs | Foreign Affairs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.428 American Foreign Policy: Theory and Method (MIT) 17.428 American Foreign Policy: Theory and Method (MIT)

Description

This course examines the causes and consequences of American foreign policy since 1898. Course readings cover both substantive and methods topics. Four substantive topics are covered: major theories of American foreign policy; major episodes in the history of American foreign policy and historical/interpretive controversies about them; the evaluation of major past American foreign policies--were their results good or bad? and current policy controversies, including means of evaluating proposed policies. Three methods topics are covered: basic social scientific inference--what are theories? what are good theories? how should theories be framed and tested? historical investigative methodology, including archival research, and, most importantly, case study methodology. Historical episodes This course examines the causes and consequences of American foreign policy since 1898. Course readings cover both substantive and methods topics. Four substantive topics are covered: major theories of American foreign policy; major episodes in the history of American foreign policy and historical/interpretive controversies about them; the evaluation of major past American foreign policies--were their results good or bad? and current policy controversies, including means of evaluating proposed policies. Three methods topics are covered: basic social scientific inference--what are theories? what are good theories? how should theories be framed and tested? historical investigative methodology, including archival research, and, most importantly, case study methodology. Historical episodes

Subjects

American foreign policy | American foreign policy | history | history | political theory | political theory | methodology | methodology | research | research | contemporary politics | contemporary politics | controversies | controversies | evaluation | evaluation | social science | social science | archival research | archival research | case study | case study

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.037 American Political Thought (MIT) 17.037 American Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research. This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Subjects

american politics | american politics | united states | united states | political theory | political theory | colonial | colonial | contemporary government | contemporary government | national identity | national identity | individual rights | individual rights | liberalism | liberalism | activism | activism | repulicanism | repulicanism | radicalism | radicalism | revolution | revolution | equality | equality | freedom | freedom | protestants | protestants | protestantism | protestantism | colonial america | colonial america | american revolution | american revolution | debate | debate | constitution | constitution | jeffersonian republicans | jeffersonian republicans | hamiltonian federalists | hamiltonian federalists | madison | madison | individualism | individualism | antebellum america | antebellum america | racism | racism | nativism | nativism | sexism | sexism | new inegalitarians | new inegalitarians | politics of inclusion | politics of inclusion | politics of difference | politics of difference | markets | markets | morals | morals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata