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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students. This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | comparative politics | Aristotle | Aristotle | political research | political research | regimes | regimes | Marxist model | Marxist model | class alliances | class alliances | democracy | democracy | pluralism | pluralism | economic growth | economic growth | party formation | party formation | political elites | political elites | interest groups | interest groups | constitutional reform | constitutional reform | political system | political system | constitutional choice | constitutional choice | leadership | leadership | state formation | state formation | modernization | modernization | political institution | political institution | embedded autonomy | embedded autonomy | dead capital | dead capital | nationalism | nationalism | electoral behavior | electoral behavior | clientelism | clientelism | patronage politics | patronage politics | corruption | corruption | self-government | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Political conduct and political corruption

Description

Presenter Ed Hall (LSE) and discussant David Hine (Oxford) look at Mark Philp's work focusing on political conduct and political corruption. This talk, introduced by current Head of Department Elizabeth Frazer, is taken from 'A celebration and critical evaluation of the work of Mark Philp'. Mark Philp was our founding Head of Department (2000-2005) and Tutorial Fellow at Oriel College (1983-2013). He is now, since 2013, Professor of History at the University of Warwick. His work in the fields of political thought and political theory are notable for their interdisciplinarity as well as the excellence of their scholarship and depth of philosophical analysis. The event took place at the Department of Politics and International Relations on 22 April 2014. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Mark Philp | political conduct | corruption | political theory | political history | Mark Philp | political conduct | corruption | political theory | political history | 2014-04-22

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.11 Special Topics in Economics: The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT) 14.11 Special Topics in Economics: The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT)

Description

This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, have had some economics, and believe that economists might have something useful to say about this question. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Does foreign aid help? What can we do about corruption? Should we leave it all to the markets? Should we leave it to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Where is the best place to intervene? How do we deal with the disease burden? How do we improve schools? And many others. This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, have had some economics, and believe that economists might have something useful to say about this question. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Does foreign aid help? What can we do about corruption? Should we leave it all to the markets? Should we leave it to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Where is the best place to intervene? How do we deal with the disease burden? How do we improve schools? And many others.

Subjects

challenge | challenge | world poverty | world poverty | economics | economics | per capita income | per capita income | health | health | fertility | fertility | mortality | mortality | birth | birth | death | death | microfinance | microfinance | NGOs | NGOs | poor | poor | education | education | colonialism | colonialism | globalization | globalization | corruption | corruption | India | India | Mexico | Mexico | United States | United States | economic growth | economic growth | development | development | credit markets | credit markets | prosperity | prosperity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.75 Political Economy and Economic Development (MIT) 14.75 Political Economy and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between political institutions and economic development, covering key theoretical issues as well as recent empirical evidence. Topics include corruption, democracy, dictatorship, and war. Discusses not just what we know on these topics, but how we know it, covering how to craft a good empirical study or field experiment and how to discriminate between reliable and unreliable evidence. This course explores the relationship between political institutions and economic development, covering key theoretical issues as well as recent empirical evidence. Topics include corruption, democracy, dictatorship, and war. Discusses not just what we know on these topics, but how we know it, covering how to craft a good empirical study or field experiment and how to discriminate between reliable and unreliable evidence.

Subjects

dictatorship | dictatorship | corruption | corruption | economics | economics | political economics | political economics | developmental economics | developmental economics | democracy | democracy | war | war | civil war | civil war | voting | voting | collective action | collective action

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-Western countries. The issues covered by the course include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing and labor standards, post-conflict development and the role of aid in development. This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-Western countries. The issues covered by the course include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing and labor standards, post-conflict development and the role of aid in development.

Subjects

international development | international development | colonialism | colonialism | imperialism | imperialism | human rights | human rights | global | global | state | state | markets | markets | NGOs | NGOs | social movements | social movements | urban | urban | rural | rural | migration | migration | trade | trade | outsourcing | outsourcing | corruption | corruption | aid | aid | poverty | poverty | security | security | conflict | conflict | state intervention | state intervention | governance | governance | law | law | privatization | privatization | participatory planning | participatory planning | decentralization | decentralization | civil service | civil service | labor | labor | post-conflict | post-conflict

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT) 14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT)

Description

14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them. 14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them.

Subjects

racial discrimination | racial discrimination | public health and persuasion | public health and persuasion | incentives | incentives | gender differences in economic environments | gender differences in economic environments | intrinsic motivation and fairness | intrinsic motivation and fairness | educational quality | educational quality | corruption | corruption | learning and social effects | learning and social effects | housing experiments | housing experiments | voting behavior and political economy | voting behavior and political economy | jury advocacy | jury advocacy | causal inference | causal inference | internal and external threats | internal and external threats | clustering | clustering | standard errors | standard errors | randomization | randomization | statistical inference with multiple outcomes | statistical inference with multiple outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.389A Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Asia-Pacific (MIT) 15.389A Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Asia-Pacific (MIT)

Description

15.389A Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Asia-Pacific enables teams of students to work with the top management of global start-ups and gain experience in running, and consulting to, a new enterprise outside the United States. The focus is on start-ups operating in emerging markets throughout the world, with a special focus on the Asia-Pacific region. The course combines an internship in a growing firm with in-class discussions of the issues and policies that affect the climate for innovation and start-up success around the world. 15.389A Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Asia-Pacific enables teams of students to work with the top management of global start-ups and gain experience in running, and consulting to, a new enterprise outside the United States. The focus is on start-ups operating in emerging markets throughout the world, with a special focus on the Asia-Pacific region. The course combines an internship in a growing firm with in-class discussions of the issues and policies that affect the climate for innovation and start-up success around the world.

Subjects

entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | developing markets | developing markets | corruption | corruption | entrepreneurial | entrepreneurial | internationalization | internationalization | entrepreneurial finance | entrepreneurial finance | entrepreneur | entrepreneur | venture capital | venture capital | commercialization | commercialization | organizational development | organizational development | Asia-Pacific | Asia-Pacific

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.389B Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa (MIT) 15.389B Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa (MIT)

Description

15.389B Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa enables teams of students to work with the top management of global start-ups and gain experience in running, and consulting to, a new enterprise outside the United States. The focus is on start-ups operating in emerging markets throughout the world, with a special focus on Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa. The course combines an internship in a growing firm with in-class discussions of the issues and policies that affect the climate for innovation and start-up success around the world. 15.389B Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa enables teams of students to work with the top management of global start-ups and gain experience in running, and consulting to, a new enterprise outside the United States. The focus is on start-ups operating in emerging markets throughout the world, with a special focus on Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa. The course combines an internship in a growing firm with in-class discussions of the issues and policies that affect the climate for innovation and start-up success around the world.

Subjects

entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | developing markets | developing markets | corruption | corruption | entrepreneurial | entrepreneurial | internationalization | internationalization | entrepreneurial finance | entrepreneurial finance | entrepreneur | entrepreneur | commercialization | commercialization | venture capital | venture capital | organizational development | organizational development | Latin America | Latin America | Africa | Africa | the Middle East | the Middle East

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.225 Economy and Business in Modern China and India (MIT) 15.225 Economy and Business in Modern China and India (MIT)

Description

As markets or production bases, China and India are becoming important and integral players in the global economy. Foreign direct investment (FDI), portfolio investments and outsourcing businesses have increased dramatically in these two economies. Despite the rising importance of these two economies on the world stage, our knowledge and analysis of these two countries in an integrated manner has remained poor. The two are often lumped together by business analysts as "emerging markets," despite the substantial differences in their political systems, reform policies and business organizations. Academics, in contrast, have tended to treat the two countries separately, preferring to specialize in issues and questions specific to one or the other country. The purpose of this course is to an As markets or production bases, China and India are becoming important and integral players in the global economy. Foreign direct investment (FDI), portfolio investments and outsourcing businesses have increased dramatically in these two economies. Despite the rising importance of these two economies on the world stage, our knowledge and analysis of these two countries in an integrated manner has remained poor. The two are often lumped together by business analysts as "emerging markets," despite the substantial differences in their political systems, reform policies and business organizations. Academics, in contrast, have tended to treat the two countries separately, preferring to specialize in issues and questions specific to one or the other country. The purpose of this course is to an

Subjects

China | China | India | India | global economy | global economy | growth | growth | foreign direct investment | foreign direct investment | portfolio investments | portfolio investments | emerging markets | emerging markets | reform policies | reform policies | business environment | business environment | financing environment | financing environment | corruption | corruption | business government relationship | business government relationship | venture capital | venture capital | private equity | private equity | intellectual property | intellectual property | India pharmaceutical industry | India pharmaceutical industry | development models. | development models.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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New Indicators of High-Level Corruption using Government Contracting Data: Examples from Eastern Europe

Description

Existing measures of corruption often suffer from bias and are too broad to guide policy or test theories. This paper proposes three new indirect indicators of high-level corruption in public procurement, using contract and organisation-level administrat The first is a composite score expressing the probability of corruption occurring in public procurement tenders based on the incidence of ?red flags? associated with barriers to competition and unusually high winner market share. The second is a binary variable marking companies whose public procurement market success depends on the government in power, generated by tracking companies? market volumes from before to after the government changes. The third is a binary variable marking those public procurement winners whose owners or Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

high-level corruption | indicators | government contracting data | Eastern Europe | high-level corruption | indicators | government contracting data | Eastern Europe | 2014-06-20

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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New Indicators of High-Level Corruption using Government Contracting Data: Examples from Eastern Europe (Slides)

Description

Existing measures of corruption often suffer from bias and are too broad to guide policy or test theories. This paper proposes three new indirect indicators of high-level corruption in public procurement, using contract and organisation-level administrat The first is a composite score expressing the probability of corruption occurring in public procurement tenders based on the incidence of ?red flags? associated with barriers to competition and unusually high winner market share. The second is a binary variable marking companies whose public procurement market success depends on the government in power, generated by tracking companies? market volumes from before to after the government changes. The third is a binary variable marking those public procurement winners whose owners or Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

high-level corruption | indicators | government contracting data | Eastern Europe | high-level corruption | indicators | government contracting data | Eastern Europe | 2014-06-20

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.561 European Politics (MIT) 17.561 European Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the organization of political power and the dynamics of political change in Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. In particular, it focuses on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations. This course examines the organization of political power and the dynamics of political change in Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. In particular, it focuses on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations.

Subjects

European politics | European politics | political power | political power | Britain | Britain | France | France | Germany | Germany | Italy | Italy | political parties | political parties | social class | social class | citizenship | citizenship | prime ministers | prime ministers | economy | economy | dictatorship | dictatorship | democracy | democracy | capitalism | capitalism | labour | labour | liberalization | liberalization | history | history | corruption | corruption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations. This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | developing--country governments | international | international | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | new--town development | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | developing countries | national planning | national planning | planners | planners | government institutions | government institutions | national government | national government | local government | local government | low-cost housing | low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | reform | reform | politics | politics | patronage | patronage | clientelism | clientelism | corruption | corruption | civil servants | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.55J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT) 17.55J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

Interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin America, drawing on films, literature, popular press accounts, and scholarly research. Topics include economic development, ethnic and racial identity, religion, revolution, democracy, transitional justice, and the rule of law. Examples draw on a range of countries in the region, especially Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. Includes a heavy oral participation component, with regular breakout groups, formal class presentations on pressing social issues (such as criminal justice and land tenure), and a structured class debate. Interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin America, drawing on films, literature, popular press accounts, and scholarly research. Topics include economic development, ethnic and racial identity, religion, revolution, democracy, transitional justice, and the rule of law. Examples draw on a range of countries in the region, especially Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. Includes a heavy oral participation component, with regular breakout groups, formal class presentations on pressing social issues (such as criminal justice and land tenure), and a structured class debate.

Subjects

17.55 | 17.55 | 21A.430 | 21A.430 | 21G.084 | 21G.084 | Mexico | Mexico | Venezuela | Venezuela | Brazil | Brazil | Chile | Chile | Latin America | Latin America | Spanish | Spanish | conquest | conquest | authoritarianism | authoritarianism | democracy | democracy | dictators | dictators | argentina | argentina | united states foreign policy | united states foreign policy | urbanization | urbanization | poverty | poverty | Big Mama's Funeral | Big Mama's Funeral | development | development | Pinochet | Pinochet | Allende | Allende | civilian-military relations | civilian-military relations | police reform | police reform | corruption | corruption | The House of Spirits | The House of Spirits | The Battle of Chile | The Battle of Chile | chinchillas | chinchillas

License

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Iraq | Iraq | president | president | division of power | division of power | China | China | gross domestic product | gross domestic product | GDP | GDP | political science | political science | culture | culture | Italy | Italy | Putnam | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | Lipset | leadership | leadership | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | democratization | democratization | modernization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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?s democracy needs greater accountability and transparency ?s democracy needs greater accountability and transparency

Description

With the Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump, the democratic world seems to have entered an era of uneasiness and rebellion. In a part of the world remote from Europe and the United States, a relatively ?young democracy??South Korea?is not immune to the changes that are sweeping through the world?s democracies. The country is experiencing a crisis unprecedented since the 1990s when it consolidated its democracy. A recent political scandal involving President Park Geun-hye and her close friend Choi Soon-sil has spilled over politics and extended to South Korea?s politics, economy and education, leading to a far-reaching national ... With the Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump, the democratic world seems to have entered an era of uneasiness and rebellion. In a part of the world remote from Europe and the United States, a relatively ?young democracy??South Korea?is not immune to the changes that are sweeping through the world?s democracies. The country is experiencing a crisis unprecedented since the 1990s when it consolidated its democracy. A recent political scandal involving President Park Geun-hye and her close friend Choi Soon-sil has spilled over politics and extended to South Korea?s politics, economy and education, leading to a far-reaching national ...

Subjects

corruption | corruption | Park Geun-hye | Park Geun-hye | populism | populism | South Korea | South Korea

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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17.905 Forms of Political Participation: Old and New (MIT) 17.905 Forms of Political Participation: Old and New (MIT)

Description

How and why do we participate in public life? How do we get drawn into community and political affairs? In this course we examine the associations and networks that connect us to one another and structure our social and political interactions. Readings are drawn from a growing body of research suggesting that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities represented by the concepts of civil society and social capital can have important effects on the functioning of democracy, stability and change in political regimes, the capacity of states to carry out their objectives, and international politics. How and why do we participate in public life? How do we get drawn into community and political affairs? In this course we examine the associations and networks that connect us to one another and structure our social and political interactions. Readings are drawn from a growing body of research suggesting that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities represented by the concepts of civil society and social capital can have important effects on the functioning of democracy, stability and change in political regimes, the capacity of states to carry out their objectives, and international politics.

Subjects

community | community | public life | public life | social network | social network | norms | norms | association | association | civil society | civil society | international relations | international relations | politics | politics | democracy | democracy | social capital | social capital | state | state | NGO | NGO | globalization | globalization | power | power | corruption | corruption | gender | gender | citizen | citizen | rebellion | rebellion | trust | trust | participation | participation | empowerment | empowerment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Left!

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: Left! Political Party: Republican Election Year: 1882 Date Made: ca. 1882 Measurement: Sheet: 13 3/4 x 21 in.; 34.925 x 53.34 cm Classification: Publications Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5z6v There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | illustrations | politicalcartoons | portraits | sheetsinformationartifacts | clevelandgrover | folgercharlesj | schurzcarl | politicians | politicalcorruption | caricatures | politics | ferryboats | docks | albanynewyork | elections | children | culidentifier:value=2214ca0014 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

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Our Modern Belshazzar

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: Our Modern Belshazzar Political Party: Republican Election Year: 1872 Date Made: 1872 Measurement: Sheet: 16 x 21.75 in.; 40.64 x 55.245 cm Classification: Prints Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5zqg There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | illustrations | sheetsinformationartifacts | politicalcartoons | portraits | grantulyssess18221885 | wilsonhenry18121875 | brownbgratz | butlerbenjaminf | colfaxschuyler | conklingroscoe | offerings | dictatorship | wine | drinking | inebriation | animals | dogs | cigars | weapons | politicalcorruption | politics | culidentifier:value=2214pr0173 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

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14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT)

Description

14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them.

Subjects

racial discrimination | public health and persuasion | incentives | gender differences in economic environments | intrinsic motivation and fairness | educational quality | corruption | learning and social effects | housing experiments | voting behavior and political economy | jury advocacy | causal inference | internal and external threats | clustering | standard errors | randomization | statistical inference with multiple outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Clasping Hands over the Bloodless (Sar)c(h)asm

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: Clasping Hands over the Bloodless (Sar)c(h)asm Political Party: Democratic Election Year: 1872 Date Made: 1872 Measurement: Sheet: 22.5 x 15.75 in.; 57.15 x 40.005 cm Classification: Publications Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5zpk There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | illustrations | sheetsinformationartifacts | politicalcartoons | portraits | grantulyssess18221885 | greeleyhorace | brownbgratz | tweedwilliammarcy | reidwhitelaw | politicians | elections | symbols | unclesam | capitolwashingtondistrictofcolumbia | whitehousewashingtondistrictofcolumbia | journalists | scandals | newspapers | politicalcorruption | hell | tiltontheodore | woodhullvictoriac | caricatures | schurzcarl | culidentifier:value=2214pr0147 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

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"Satan, Don't Get Thee Behind Me!" - Any Thing to get Possession

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: "Satan, Don't Get Thee Behind Me!" - Any Thing to get Possession Political Party: Democratic Election Year: 1872 Date Made: 1872 Measurement: Sheet: 22.5 x 15.5 in.; 57.15 x 39.37 cm Classification: Publications Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5zpr There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | illustrations | sheetsinformationartifacts | politicalcartoons | portraits | greeleyhorace | brownbgratz | satan | caricatures | politicalcorruption | washingtondistrictofcolumbia | capitolwashingtondistrictofcolumbia | whitehousewashingtondistrictofcolumbia | temptation | culidentifier:value=2214pr0152 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

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"Look Here, Upon This Picture. And On This."

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: "Look Here, Upon This Picture. And On This." Political Party: Republican Election Year: 1872 Date Made: 1872 Measurement: Sheet (unfolded): 16 x 21.75 in.; 40.64 x 55.245 cm Classification: Publications Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5zq6 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | illustrations | sheetsinformationartifacts | politicalcartoons | portraits | grantulyssess18221885 | greeleyhorace | women | quotationstexts | shakespearewilliam | children | politicians | politicalcorruption | politics | promotionalmaterials | caricatures | cannons | weapons | soldiers | kings | thrones | symbols | education | farming | industry | schurzcarl | sumnercharles | culidentifier:value=2214pr0165 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

License

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