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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT) 6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment. 6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | network | computer security | computer security | security | security | cryptography | cryptography | secret-key | secret-key | public-key | public-key | digital signature | digital signature | authentication | authentication | identification | identification | intrusion detection | intrusion detection | virus | virus | operating system | operating system | software | software | protection | protection | electronic mail | electronic mail | email | email | electronic commerce | electronic commerce | electronic cash | electronic cash | firewall | firewall | computer | computer | digital | digital | signature | signature | electronic | electronic | cash | cash | commerce | commerce | mail | mail | operating | operating | system | system | intrustion | intrustion | detection | detection | distributed | distributed | physical | physical | discretionary | discretionary | mandatory | mandatory | access | access | control | control | biometrics | biometrics | information | information | flow | flow | models | models | covert | covert | channels | channels | integrity | integrity | logic | logic | voting | voting | risk | risk | assessment | assessment | secure | secure | web | web | browsers | browsers | architecture | architecture | engineering | engineering | certificates | certificates | multi-user computer systems | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | physical security | discretionary access control | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | information-flow models | covert channels | covert channels | integrity models | integrity models | elementary cryptography | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | viruses | firewalls | firewalls | electronic voting | electronic voting | risk assessment | risk assessment | secure web browsers | secure web browsers | network security | network security | architecture engineering | architecture engineering | digital signatures | digital signatures | authentication schemes | authentication schemes | identification schemes | identification schemes | formal models | formal models | secure operating systems | secure operating systems | software protection | software protection | electronic mail security | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | World Wide Web | ecommerce | ecommerce | email security | email security | www | www | payment protocols | payment protocols | authentication logic | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT) 6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modelling and compensation of power coverter systems and phase lock loops. This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modelling and compensation of power coverter systems and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | feedback system | time-domain performance | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance | frequency-domain performance | stability | stability | root locus method | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | compensation techniques | internal compensation | internal compensation | external compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | power coverter systems | phase lock loops | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Intelligence and National Security (MIT) 17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Intelligence and National Security (MIT)

Description

This course will examine the origins, structure and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community and its relationship to national security policy. It will look in some detail at the key intelligence agencies and the functions they perform, including collection, analysis, counterintelligence and covert action. It will also look at some of the key intelligence missions, such as strategic warning, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and counterinsurgency. Finally, it will examine some of the major controversies concerning intelligence, including its successes and failures, relationship to policymakers, congressional oversight, and the need for reform. This course will examine the origins, structure and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community and its relationship to national security policy. It will look in some detail at the key intelligence agencies and the functions they perform, including collection, analysis, counterintelligence and covert action. It will also look at some of the key intelligence missions, such as strategic warning, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and counterinsurgency. Finally, it will examine some of the major controversies concerning intelligence, including its successes and failures, relationship to policymakers, congressional oversight, and the need for reform.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | natioanl security | natioanl security | origins | origins | structure | structure | functions | functions | U.S. | U.S. | Intelligence | Intelligence | Community | Community | national security policy | national security policy | intelligence agencies | intelligence agencies | collection | collection | analysis | analysis | counterintelligence | counterintelligence | covert action | covert action | strategic warning | strategic warning | counterterrorism | counterterrorism | counterproliferation | counterproliferation | counterinsurgency | counterinsurgency | controversies | controversies | policymakers | policymakers | congressional oversight | congressional oversight | reform | reform

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT) 6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops. This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | feedback system | time-domain performance | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | compensation techniques | internal compensation | internal compensation | external compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | power coverter systems | phase lock loops | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT) 6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops. This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | feedback system | time-domain performance | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | compensation techniques | internal compensation | internal compensation | external compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | power coverter systems | phase lock loops | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT) 24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course covers some of the basic ideas in the subfield syntax, within the framework often referred to as "Generative Grammar". This course covers some of the basic ideas in the subfield syntax, within the framework often referred to as "Generative Grammar".

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | language structure | language structure | theory | theory | binding theory | binding theory | syntactic movement | syntactic movement | wh-movement | wh-movement | verbs | verbs | tense | tense | A-movement | A-movement | specifiers | specifiers | complementizers | complementizers | theta-roles | theta-roles | subcategorization | subcategorization | covert movement | covert movement

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | internal compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | internal compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | internal compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allportuguesecourses.xml

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modelling and compensation of power coverter systems and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance | stability | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | internal compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course covers some of the basic ideas in the subfield syntax, within the framework often referred to as "Generative Grammar".

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | language structure | theory | binding theory | syntactic movement | wh-movement | verbs | tense | A-movement | specifiers | complementizers | theta-roles | subcategorization | covert movement

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | internal compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Intelligence and National Security (MIT)

Description

This course will examine the origins, structure and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community and its relationship to national security policy. It will look in some detail at the key intelligence agencies and the functions they perform, including collection, analysis, counterintelligence and covert action. It will also look at some of the key intelligence missions, such as strategic warning, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and counterinsurgency. Finally, it will examine some of the major controversies concerning intelligence, including its successes and failures, relationship to policymakers, congressional oversight, and the need for reform.

Subjects

Political science | natioanl security | origins | structure | functions | U.S. | Intelligence | Community | national security policy | intelligence agencies | collection | analysis | counterintelligence | covert action | strategic warning | counterterrorism | counterproliferation | counterinsurgency | controversies | policymakers | congressional oversight | reform

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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