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20.416J Topics in Biophysics and Physical Biology (MIT) 20.416J Topics in Biophysics and Physical Biology (MIT)

Description

This course provides broad exposure to research in biophysics and physical biology, with emphasis on the critical evaluation of scientific literature. Weekly meetings include in-depth discussion of scientific literature led by various MIT faculty on active research topics. Each session also includes a brief discussion of non-research topics including effective presentation skills, writing papers and fellowship proposals, choosing scientific and technical research topics, time management, and scientific ethics. This course provides broad exposure to research in biophysics and physical biology, with emphasis on the critical evaluation of scientific literature. Weekly meetings include in-depth discussion of scientific literature led by various MIT faculty on active research topics. Each session also includes a brief discussion of non-research topics including effective presentation skills, writing papers and fellowship proposals, choosing scientific and technical research topics, time management, and scientific ethics.

Subjects

20.416 | 20.416 | 7.74 | 7.74 | 8.590 | 8.590 | computational biology | computational biology | science | science | research | research | genome | genome | chromatin | chromatin | fellowship | fellowship | proposal | proposal | grad school | grad school | graduate school | graduate school | nano | nano | writing | writing | journal | journal | article | article | abstract | abstract | peer review | peer review | critique | critique | manuscript | manuscript | talk | talk | presentation | presentation | ethics | ethics | cv | cv | curriculum vitae | curriculum vitae

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT) 4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT)

Description

This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling. This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling.

Subjects

movies | movies | filmmaking | filmmaking | digital video | digital video | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | media | media | computerized editing | computerized editing | personal story | personal story | emotional art | emotional art | Fluxus | Fluxus | Bill Viola | Bill Viola | digital representation | digital representation | video recording | video recording | editing | editing | self-exploration | self-exploration | performance | performance | social critique | social critique | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | narrative | narrative | abstract | abstract | documentary | documentary | essay | essay | video capture | video capture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.360 Ethnography (MIT) STS.360 Ethnography (MIT)

Description

This course is a practicum-style seminar in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the course is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites. This course is a practicum-style seminar in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the course is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | fieldwork | fieldwork | oral history | oral history | ethnomethodology | ethnomethodology | advertising | advertising | knowledge communities | knowledge communities | interviewing | interviewing | restudies | restudies | practicum | practicum | anthropological methods | anthropological methods | ethnographic fieldwork | ethnographic fieldwork | ethnographic writing | ethnographic writing | ethnographic reading | ethnographic reading | ethnographic practice | ethnographic practice | anthropological studies | anthropological studies | science studies | science studies | ethnographies | ethnographies | labs | labs | companies | companies | sites | sites | advocacy | advocacy | critique | critique | transference | transference | countertransference | countertransference | translation | translation | data | data | models | models | explanations | explanations | hypotheses | hypotheses | generalizations | generalizations | interpretations | interpretations | ethnography | ethnography

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.732-5 Introduction to Technical Communication: Explorations in Scientific and Technical Writing (MIT) 21W.732-5 Introduction to Technical Communication: Explorations in Scientific and Technical Writing (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to produce clear and effective scientific and technical documents. We will focus on basic principles of good writing-which scientific and technical writing shares with other forms of writing-and on types of documents common in scientific and technical fields and organizations. While the emphasis will be on writing, oral communication of scientific and technical information will form an important component of the course, as well. This course is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to produce clear and effective scientific and technical documents. We will focus on basic principles of good writing-which scientific and technical writing shares with other forms of writing-and on types of documents common in scientific and technical fields and organizations. While the emphasis will be on writing, oral communication of scientific and technical information will form an important component of the course, as well.

Subjects

scienticifc writing | scienticifc writing | scientific documents | scientific documents | technical documents | technical documents | argument | argument | review | review | critique | critique | graphics | graphics | email | email | webpage writing | webpage writing | webpage design | webpage design | literature reivew | literature reivew | narrative essay | narrative essay | technical description | technical description | design proposal | design proposal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.110 Anthropological Theory (MIT) 21A.110 Anthropological Theory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform anthropological analysis. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation. Ultimately, all theories can be read as statements about human beings and the worlds they create and inhabit. We will approach each theoretical perspective or proposition on three levels: (1) in terms of its analytical or explanatory power for understanding human behavior and the social world; (2) in the context of the social and historical circumstances in which they were produced; and (3) as contributions to ongoing dialogues and debate. This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform anthropological analysis. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation. Ultimately, all theories can be read as statements about human beings and the worlds they create and inhabit. We will approach each theoretical perspective or proposition on three levels: (1) in terms of its analytical or explanatory power for understanding human behavior and the social world; (2) in the context of the social and historical circumstances in which they were produced; and (3) as contributions to ongoing dialogues and debate.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | anthropological theory | anthropological theory | anthropological method | anthropological method | frameworks | frameworks | analysis | analysis | integration | integration | cultural anthropology | cultural anthropology | classic texts | classic texts | contemporary critiques | contemporary critiques | analyses of texts | analyses of texts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-3 Expository Writing: Autobiography - Theory and Practice (MIT) 21W.730-3 Expository Writing: Autobiography - Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

Focus: What can we believe when we read an autobiography? How do writers recall, select, shape, and present their lives to construct life stories?  Readings that ground these questions include selections from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Linda Brent (pseudonym for Harriet Jacobs), "A Sketch of the Past" by Virginia Woolf, Notes of A Native Son by James Baldwin, "The Achievement of Desire" by Richard Rodriguez, The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston, and "Our Secret" by Susan Griffin. Discussion, papers, and brief oral presentations will focus on the content of the life stories as well as the forms and techniques authors use to shape autobiography. We will identify masks and stances used to achieve various goals, sources and interrelationshi Focus: What can we believe when we read an autobiography? How do writers recall, select, shape, and present their lives to construct life stories?  Readings that ground these questions include selections from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Linda Brent (pseudonym for Harriet Jacobs), "A Sketch of the Past" by Virginia Woolf, Notes of A Native Son by James Baldwin, "The Achievement of Desire" by Richard Rodriguez, The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston, and "Our Secret" by Susan Griffin. Discussion, papers, and brief oral presentations will focus on the content of the life stories as well as the forms and techniques authors use to shape autobiography. We will identify masks and stances used to achieve various goals, sources and interrelationshi

Subjects

writing | writing | autobiography | autobiography | text | text | composition | composition | critical reading | critical reading | voice | voice | Exposition | Exposition | narration | narration | critique | critique | argument | argument | persuasion | persuasion | oral presentations | oral presentations | prose | prose | write | write | revising | revising | life stories | life stories

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT) 21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | cross-cultural study | cross-cultural study | bio-medical ethics | bio-medical ethics | moral foundations | moral foundations | science | science | western bio-medicine | western bio-medicine | case studies | case studies | abortion | abortion | contraception | contraception | cloning | cloning | organ transplantation | organ transplantation | medical technologies | medical technologies | practice | practice | availability | availability | medical services | medical services | globe | globe | kinship | kinship | personhood | personhood | critique | critique | anthropological | anthropological | feminist | feminist | legal | legal | religious | religious | theorists. | theorists. | theorists | theorists | 21A.216 | 21A.216 | SP.622 | SP.622

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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s Critique of Judgement: Lecture 1

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford gives his fourth lecture in the Aesthetics series on Kant's Critique of Judgement. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement | aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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s Critique of Judgement: Lecture 2

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford concludes his discussion of Kant's Critique of Judgement in the fifth lecture of the Aesthetics series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement | aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.110 Anthropological Theory (MIT) 21A.110 Anthropological Theory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform anthropological analysis. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation. Ultimately, all theories can be read as statements about human beings and the worlds they create and inhabit. We will approach each theoretical perspective or proposition on three levels: (1) in terms of its analytical or explanatory power for understanding human behavior and the social world; (2) in the context of the social and historical circumstances in which they were produced; and (3) as contributions to ongoing dialogues and debate. This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform anthropological analysis. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation. Ultimately, all theories can be read as statements about human beings and the worlds they create and inhabit. We will approach each theoretical perspective or proposition on three levels: (1) in terms of its analytical or explanatory power for understanding human behavior and the social world; (2) in the context of the social and historical circumstances in which they were produced; and (3) as contributions to ongoing dialogues and debate.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | anthropological theory | anthropological theory | anthropological method | anthropological method | frameworks | frameworks | analysis | analysis | integration | integration | cultural anthropology | cultural anthropology | classic texts | classic texts | contemporary critiques | contemporary critiques | analyses of texts | analyses of texts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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?

Description

Lecture 1/8. Both sense and reason are limited. Kant must identify the proper mission and domain of each, as well as the manner in which their separate functions come to be integrated in what is finally the inter-subjectively settled knowledge of science. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The broader philosophical context

Description

Lecture 2/8. The significant advances in physics in the 17th century stood in vivid contrast to the stagnation of traditional metaphysics, but why should metaphysics be conceived as a "science" in the first place? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Description

Lecture 3/8. Kant's so-called "Copernican" revolution in metaphysics begins with the recognition of the observer's contribution to the observation. Thus, to the extent that Hume's empiricism restricts knowledge to experience, empiricism succeeds only by accepting the a priori grounding of experience itself. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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How are a priori synthetic judgements possible?

Description

Lecture 4/8. Kant claims that, "our sense representation is not a representation of things in themselves, but of the way in which they appear to us. Hence it follows that the propositions of geometry... cannot be referred with the assurance to actual objects; but rather that they are necessarily valid of space... [and] space is nothing else than the form of all external appearances". [Prolegomena 286-287] Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Idealisms and their refutations

Description

Lecture 5/8. The very possibility of self-awareness (an "inner sense" with content) requires an awareness of an external world by way of "outer sense". Only through awareness of stable elements in the external world is self-consciousness possible. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Concepts, judgement and the Transcendental Deduction of the Categories

Description

Lecture 6/8. Empiricists have no explanation for how we move from "mere forms of thought" to objective concepts. The conditions necessary for the knowledge of an object require a priori categories as the enabling conditions of all human understanding. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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and the Synthetic Unity of Apperception

Description

Lecture 7/8. Kant argues that: "The synthetic unity of consciousness is... an objective condition of all knowledge. It is not merely a condition that I myself require in knowing an object, but is a condition under which every intuition must stand in order to become an object for me". Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The discipline of reason: The paralogisms and Antinomies of Pure Reason.

Description

Lecture 8/8. Reason, properly disciplined, draws permissible inferences from the resulting concepts of the understanding. The outcome is knowledge. When rightly employed, the perceptual and cognitive powers match up the right way with the real world and ground the knowledge-claims of the developed sciences. However, there is a strong tendency to stretch these processes beyond the permissible boundaries and seek what Kant refers to as "transcendental ideas" that go beyond the realm of actual or possible experience. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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?

Description

Lecture 1/8. Both sense and reason are limited. Kant must identify the proper mission and domain of each, as well as the manner in which their separate functions come to be integrated in what is finally the inter-subjectively settled knowledge of science. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129206/audio.xml

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The broader philosophical context

Description

Lecture 2/8. The significant advances in physics in the 17th century stood in vivid contrast to the stagnation of traditional metaphysics, but why should metaphysics be conceived as a "science" in the first place? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129206/audio.xml

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Description

Lecture 3/8. Kant's so-called "Copernican" revolution in metaphysics begins with the recognition of the observer's contribution to the observation. Thus, to the extent that Hume's empiricism restricts knowledge to experience, empiricism succeeds only by accepting the a priori grounding of experience itself. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129206/audio.xml

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How are a priori synthetic judgements possible?

Description

Lecture 4/8. Kant claims that, "our sense representation is not a representation of things in themselves, but of the way in which they appear to us. Hence it follows that the propositions of geometry... cannot be referred with the assurance to actual objects; but rather that they are necessarily valid of space... [and] space is nothing else than the form of all external appearances". [Prolegomena 286-287] Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129206/audio.xml

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Idealisms and their refutations

Description

Lecture 5/8. The very possibility of self-awareness (an "inner sense" with content) requires an awareness of an external world by way of "outer sense". Only through awareness of stable elements in the external world is self-consciousness possible. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129206/audio.xml

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Concepts, judgement and the Transcendental Deduction of the Categories

Description

Lecture 6/8. Empiricists have no explanation for how we move from "mere forms of thought" to objective concepts. The conditions necessary for the knowledge of an object require a priori categories as the enabling conditions of all human understanding. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129206/audio.xml

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and the Synthetic Unity of Apperception

Description

Lecture 7/8. Kant argues that: "The synthetic unity of consciousness is... an objective condition of all knowledge. It is not merely a condition that I myself require in knowing an object, but is a condition under which every intuition must stand in order to become an object for me". Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason | kant | philosophy | critique of pure reason

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

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