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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT) 21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary

Subjects

Cross-cultural | Cross-cultural | business | business | science | science | technology | technology | communication styles | communication styles | communication techniques | communication techniques | cultural norms | cultural norms | tradition | tradition | communication | communication | culture | culture | verbal communication | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | argumentation | negotiation | negotiation | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | Asian culture | European culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.019 | 21F.021 | 21F.021

License

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT) 21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary

Subjects

Cross-cultural | Cross-cultural | business | business | science | science | technology | technology | communication styles | communication styles | communication techniques | communication techniques | cultural norms | cultural norms | tradition | tradition | communication | communication | culture | culture | verbal communication | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | argumentation | negotiation | negotiation | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | Asian culture | European culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.019 | 21F.021 | 21F.021

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT) 21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts--or for that matter, people--we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its prima It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts--or for that matter, people--we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its prima

Subjects

Cross-cultural | Cross-cultural | business | business | science | science | technology | technology | communication styles | communication styles | communication techniques | communication techniques | cultural norms | cultural norms | tradition | tradition | communication | communication | culture | culture | verbal communication | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | argumentation | negotiation | negotiation | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | Asian culture | European culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.019 | 21F.021 | 21F.021

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT) 9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

social animals | social animals | social | social | animals | animals | society | society | human society | human society | members | members | community | community | living together | living together | mutual benefit | mutual benefit | people | people | region | region | country | country | world | world | whole | whole | association | association | body | body | individuals | individuals | functional interdependence | functional interdependence | national or cultural identity | national or cultural identity | social solidarity | social solidarity | language or hierarchical organization | language or hierarchical organization | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | groups | groups | economic | economic | social or industrial infrastructure | social or industrial infrastructure | made up of a varied collection of individuals | made up of a varied collection of individuals | ethnic groups | ethnic groups | nation state | nation state | broader cultural group | broader cultural group | organized voluntary association of people for religious | organized voluntary association of people for religious | benevolent | benevolent | cultural | cultural | scientific | scientific | political | political | patriotic | patriotic | or other purposes. | or other purposes.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT) 21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT)

Description

This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets. This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets.

Subjects

television | television | world markets | world markets | globalization | globalization | national cultures of production and reception | national cultures of production and reception | international cultural exchange | international cultural exchange | format trading | format trading | creativity of translation | creativity of translation | international circulation of light entertainment | international circulation of light entertainment | identity formation | identity formation | domestic content regulation strategies | domestic content regulation strategies | cultural imports | cultural imports | media imperialism | media imperialism | production industires | production industires | economics | economics | cultural translation | cultural translation | universal texts | universal texts | trade flows | trade flows | adaptation | adaptation | subtitling | subtitling | genre | genre | transparency | transparency | diasporic media | diasporic media | American culture | American culture | local reception | local reception | response | response

License

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15.322 Leading Organizations II (MIT) 15.322 Leading Organizations II (MIT)

Description

Through lectures, discussions, and class exercises, 15.322 analyzes the human processes underlying organizational behavior and change. The class makes students aware of the challenge of organizational change and equips them to better handle it. There are many psychological and sociological phenomena that regularly occur in organizations, though many of these forces are difficult to see. The aim is to increase the students' understanding of these forces – in themselves and in others – so they become more visible and manageable. The prerequisite for this course is 15.321, Leading Organizations I. Through lectures, discussions, and class exercises, 15.322 analyzes the human processes underlying organizational behavior and change. The class makes students aware of the challenge of organizational change and equips them to better handle it. There are many psychological and sociological phenomena that regularly occur in organizations, though many of these forces are difficult to see. The aim is to increase the students' understanding of these forces – in themselves and in others – so they become more visible and manageable. The prerequisite for this course is 15.321, Leading Organizations I.

Subjects

organizational change | organizational change | managerial styles | managerial styles | leaders | leaders | coping with change | coping with change | psychology | psychology | sociology | sociology | employee behavior | employee behavior | strategic design | strategic design | political perspective;cultural perspective | political perspective;cultural perspective | three lenses | three lenses | politics | politics | learning styles | learning styles | career anchors | career anchors | career choices | career choices | organizationalanalysis | organizationalanalysis | group process | group process | process consultation | process consultation | salary;reward systems | salary;reward systems | incentives | incentives | business culture | business culture | political perspective | political perspective | salary | salary | reward systems | reward systems | organizational analysis | organizational analysis | cultural perspective | cultural perspective | organizational behavior | organizational behavior | human processes | human processes | leadership | leadership | cultural perspectives | cultural perspectives | change management | change management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Patrimonio Cultural (2015) Patrimonio Cultural (2015)

Description

La asignatura tiene como objetivo prioritario dar a conocer las posibilidades que ofrece el patrimonio cultural en nuestros días. Para ello se analizará lo que engloba realmente esta disciplina y se conocerán sus diversas formas a través del estudio de referentes patrimoniales concretos. A la vez se darán pautas para mostrar las implicaciones educativas, turísticas, económicas y sociales que el mismo tiene. La asignatura tiene como objetivo prioritario dar a conocer las posibilidades que ofrece el patrimonio cultural en nuestros días. Para ello se analizará lo que engloba realmente esta disciplina y se conocerán sus diversas formas a través del estudio de referentes patrimoniales concretos. A la vez se darán pautas para mostrar las implicaciones educativas, turísticas, económicas y sociales que el mismo tiene.

Subjects

bien cultural | bien cultural | Patrimonio cultural | Patrimonio cultural | ía | ía | arte | arte | historia | historia

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | life narrative | revision | writing | self | society | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT) 24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists.

Subjects

brain | brain | philosophy | philosophy | science | science | holism | holism | cultural object | cultural object | contemporary media | contemporary media | society | society | cultural assumptions | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | neuroscience | anthropology | anthropology | history | history | semiotics | semiotics | cognitive sciences | cognitive sciences | historical views | historical views | digital images | digital images | psychopharmacology | psychopharmacology | mental illness | mental illness | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | brain science | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.027J Visualizing Cultures (MIT) 21G.027J Visualizing Cultures (MIT)

Description

In this new course, students will study how images have been used to shape the identity of peoples and cultures. A prototype digital project looking at American and Japanese graphics depicting the opening of Japan to the outside world in the 1850s will be used as a case study to introduce the conceptual and practical issues involved in "visualizing cultures". The major course requirement will be creation and presentation of a project involving visualized cultures. In this new course, students will study how images have been used to shape the identity of peoples and cultures. A prototype digital project looking at American and Japanese graphics depicting the opening of Japan to the outside world in the 1850s will be used as a case study to introduce the conceptual and practical issues involved in "visualizing cultures". The major course requirement will be creation and presentation of a project involving visualized cultures.

Subjects

cultural perception | cultural perception | imagery | imagery | cultural identity | cultural identity | 21F.027J | 21F.027J | 21F.027 | 21F.027 | 21H.917 | 21H.917

License

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CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT) CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods. This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods.

Subjects

Media | Media | mass media | mass media | history | history | Gutenberg | Gutenberg | cultural change | cultural change | cultural history | cultural history | social history | social history | historiographic method | historiographic method | books | books | medieval history | medieval history | codex book | codex book | writing | writing | printing | printing | printing press | printing press | stage | stage | theater | theater | renaissance | renaissance | romanticism | romanticism | modernity | modernity | inventions | inventions | photography | photography | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | image | image | telegraph | telegraph | electrification | electrification | communication | communication | Morse | Morse | Daguerreotype | Daguerreotype | Fox Talbot | Fox Talbot | phonograph | phonograph | sound recording | sound recording | radio | radio | broadcasting | broadcasting | film | film | video | video | cinema | cinema | publishing | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.987 Human Origins and Evolution (MIT) 3.987 Human Origins and Evolution (MIT)

Description

This course examines the dynamic interrelations among physical and behavioral traits of humans, environment, and culture to provide an integrated framework for studying human biological evolution and modern diversity. Topics include issues in morphological evolution and adaptation; fossil and cultural evidence for human evolution from earliest times through the Pleistocene; evolution of tool use and social behavior; modern human variation and concepts of race. The class also studies stone artifacts and fossil specimens. This course examines the dynamic interrelations among physical and behavioral traits of humans, environment, and culture to provide an integrated framework for studying human biological evolution and modern diversity. Topics include issues in morphological evolution and adaptation; fossil and cultural evidence for human evolution from earliest times through the Pleistocene; evolution of tool use and social behavior; modern human variation and concepts of race. The class also studies stone artifacts and fossil specimens.

Subjects

cultural evolution | pre-hominid | hominid | Pleistocene adaptations | morphological variation | race | agriculture | urbanization | paleontology | archaeology | Oligocene | Miocene | Homo | Homo erectus | Homo heidelbergensis | Homo neanderthalensis | Homo sapiens | fossil | cultural evolution | pre-hominid | hominid | Pleistocene adaptations | morphological variation | race | agriculture | urbanization | paleontology | archaeology | Oligocene | Miocene | Homo | Homo erectus | Homo heidelbergensis | Homo neanderthalensis | Homo sapiens | fossil | cultural evolution | cultural evolution | pre-hominid | pre-hominid | hominid | hominid | Pleistocene adaptations | Pleistocene adaptations | morphological variation | morphological variation | race | race | agriculture | agriculture | urbanization | urbanization | paleontology | paleontology | archaeology | archaeology | Oligocene | Oligocene | Miocene | Miocene | Homo | Homo | Homo erectus | Homo erectus | Homo heidelbergensis | Homo heidelbergensis | Homo neanderthalensis | Homo neanderthalensis | Homo sapiens | Homo sapiens | fossil | fossil

License

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | mysogyny | mysogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | musical | musical | corporeal | corporeal | visual | visual | spoken word | spoken word | literary | literary | American cultural imagery | American cultural imagery | African American | African American | cultural practices | cultural practices | material culture | material culture | performance studio | performance studio | hip hop style | hip hop style | rapping | rapping | break | break | breaking | breaking | beats | beats | dj | dj | dee jay | dee jay | turntables | turntables | mic | mic | mc | mc | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | sex | sex | feminist | feminist | electronica | electronica | mediated performance | mediated performance | anarchy | anarchy | commodity fetishism | commodity fetishism | globalization | globalization | whiteness | whiteness | realness | realness | journalism | journalism | criticism | criticism | autobiography | autobiography | black | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | life narrative | revision | writing | self | society | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Men standing by a silo Men standing by a silo

Description

Subjects

florida | florida | universityofflorida | universityofflorida | silos | silos | agriculturalexperimentstation | agriculturalexperimentstation | countyagriculturalagents | countyagriculturalagents

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary

Subjects

Cross-cultural | business | science | technology | communication styles | communication techniques | cultural norms | tradition | communication | culture | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | negotiation | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.021

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT) STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world. This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | complex interrelationships | complex interrelationships | humans | humans | natural environments | natural environments | conflict | conflict | access | access | land rights | land rights | hunting | hunting | fishing | fishing | environmental regulations | environmental regulations | scientific | scientific | popular | popular | knowledge | knowledge | biotechnology | biotechnology | hazardous waste | hazardous waste | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | environmental | environmental | stakes | stakes | forest | forest | agricultural | agricultural | marine | marine | urban | urban | cultural | cultural | historical | historical | power relationships | power relationships | local | local | national | national | international levels. nature | international levels. nature | European thought | European thought | theoretical paradigms | theoretical paradigms | ethnographic | ethnographic | East Africa | East Africa | South Asia | South Asia | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | North America | North America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Front elevation Front elevation

Description

Subjects

centro | centro | cultural | cultural | fundação | fundação | ramadi | ramadi | gulbenkian | gulbenkian | iraque | iraque | fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | centroculturalderamadi | centroculturalderamadi

License

No known copyright restrictions

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11.941 Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities (MIT) 11.941 Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities (MIT)

Description

The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discussions to assist students in becoming mindful of the potential and pitfalls of comparative analysis, the types of data, the methods of analysis, and the urban issues or sectors which may benefit the most from such approaches. The course is designed to be interdisciplinary and interactive, and The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discussions to assist students in becoming mindful of the potential and pitfalls of comparative analysis, the types of data, the methods of analysis, and the urban issues or sectors which may benefit the most from such approaches. The course is designed to be interdisciplinary and interactive, and

Subjects

urban studies | urban studies | first third | first third | world | world | comparison | comparison | city | city | globalization | globalization | multicultural | multicultural | qualitative methods | qualitative methods | quantitative methods | quantitative methods | cultural analysis | cultural analysis | urban | urban | comparative case studies | comparative case studies | policy | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts--or for that matter, people--we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its prima

Subjects

Cross-cultural | business | science | technology | communication styles | communication techniques | cultural norms | tradition | communication | culture | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | negotiation | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.021

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.742J Writing About Race: Narratives of Multiraciality (MIT) 21W.742J Writing About Race: Narratives of Multiraciality (MIT)

Description

In this course we will read essays, novels, memoirs, and graphic texts, and view documentary and experimental films and videos which explore race from the standpoint of the multiracial. Examining the varied work of multiracial authors and filmmakers such as Danzy Senna, Ruth Ozeki, Kip Fulbeck, James McBride and others, we will focus not on how multiracial people are seen or imagined by the dominant culture, but instead on how they represent themselves. How do these authors approach issues of family, community, nation, language and history? What can their work tell us about the complex interconnections between race, gender, class, sexuality, and citizenship? Is there a relationship between their experiences of multiraciality and a willingness to experiment with form and genre? In addressin In this course we will read essays, novels, memoirs, and graphic texts, and view documentary and experimental films and videos which explore race from the standpoint of the multiracial. Examining the varied work of multiracial authors and filmmakers such as Danzy Senna, Ruth Ozeki, Kip Fulbeck, James McBride and others, we will focus not on how multiracial people are seen or imagined by the dominant culture, but instead on how they represent themselves. How do these authors approach issues of family, community, nation, language and history? What can their work tell us about the complex interconnections between race, gender, class, sexuality, and citizenship? Is there a relationship between their experiences of multiraciality and a willingness to experiment with form and genre? In addressin

Subjects

21W.742 | 21W.742 | WGS.231 | WGS.231 | multiracial | multiracial | multi-race | multi-race | mixed-race | mixed-race | multiraciality | multiraciality | multiple descent | multiple descent | hybrid populations | hybrid populations | mixed ancestry | mixed ancestry | race | race | assimilation | assimilation | integration | integration | ethnicity | ethnicity | identity | identity | self | self | heritage | heritage | multicultural | multicultural | mixed heritage | mixed heritage | mulato | mulato | mestizo | mestizo | oppression | oppression | immigration | immigration | diaspora | diaspora | racism | racism | sterotype | sterotype | family | family | cultural studies | cultural studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT) 15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms. This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | interpersonal communication | business presentations | business presentations | communication strategies | communication strategies | teamwork | teamwork | running meetings | running meetings | managerial communication | managerial communication | business writing | business writing | business speaking | business speaking | group decision making | group decision making | hostile audience | hostile audience | role play exercises | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | persuading audiences | listening | listening | nonverbal communication | nonverbal communication | A | A | question and answer | question and answer | working with media | working with media | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT) 15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in (15.279) Management Communication for Undergraduates or (15.280) Communication for Managers. It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms. This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in (15.279) Management Communication for Undergraduates or (15.280) Communication for Managers. It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | interpersonal communication | business presentations | business presentations | communication strategies | communication strategies | teamwork | teamwork | running meetings | running meetings | managerial communication | managerial communication | business writing | business writing | business speaking | business speaking | group decision making | group decision making | hostile audience | hostile audience | role play exercises | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | persuading audiences | listening | listening | nonverbal communication | nonverbal communication | A | A | question and answer | question and answer | working with media | working with media | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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