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15.996 Cross-Cultural Leadership (MIT) 15.996 Cross-Cultural Leadership (MIT)

Description

Cross Cultural Leadership is a collaborative research seminar that examines what constitutes "effective" leadership across cultures. It is collaborative because the students are expected to provide some of the content. The weekly readings target particular aspects of cultural differentiation. Working within those topics, students are asked to describe aspects of leadership in particular cultures based on their research and/or personal experiences. The goal of the course is to help prepare students for business assignments outside of their native countries. Course deliverables include: active participation in the class, contribution of class content on a weekly basis and an end of course paper that explores some aspect of leadership across cultures. Cross Cultural Leadership is a collaborative research seminar that examines what constitutes "effective" leadership across cultures. It is collaborative because the students are expected to provide some of the content. The weekly readings target particular aspects of cultural differentiation. Working within those topics, students are asked to describe aspects of leadership in particular cultures based on their research and/or personal experiences. The goal of the course is to help prepare students for business assignments outside of their native countries. Course deliverables include: active participation in the class, contribution of class content on a weekly basis and an end of course paper that explores some aspect of leadership across cultures.

Subjects

"effective" leadership across cultures | "effective" leadership across cultures | skills and behaviors | skills and behaviors | effective leadership characteristics | effective leadership characteristics | one culture; different culture | one culture; different culture | specific characteristics | specific characteristics | different cultures | different cultures | frameworks for assessing how to approach a work assignment in a different culture | frameworks for assessing how to approach a work assignment in a different culture | one culture | one culture | different culture | different culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.996 Cross-Cultural Leadership (MIT) 15.996 Cross-Cultural Leadership (MIT)

Description

Cross Cultural Leadership is a collaborative research seminar that examines what constitutes "effective" leadership across cultures. It is collaborative because the students are expected to provide some of the content. The weekly readings target particular aspects of cultural differentiation. Working within those topics, students are asked to describe aspects of leadership in particular cultures based on their research and/or personal experiences. The goal of the course is to help prepare students for business assignments outside of their native countries. Course deliverables include: active participation in the class, contribution of class content on a weekly basis and an end of course paper that explores some aspect of leadership across cultures. Cross Cultural Leadership is a collaborative research seminar that examines what constitutes "effective" leadership across cultures. It is collaborative because the students are expected to provide some of the content. The weekly readings target particular aspects of cultural differentiation. Working within those topics, students are asked to describe aspects of leadership in particular cultures based on their research and/or personal experiences. The goal of the course is to help prepare students for business assignments outside of their native countries. Course deliverables include: active participation in the class, contribution of class content on a weekly basis and an end of course paper that explores some aspect of leadership across cultures.

Subjects

"effective" leadership across cultures | "effective" leadership across cultures | skills and behaviors | skills and behaviors | effective leadership characteristics | effective leadership characteristics | one culture; different culture | one culture; different culture | specific characteristics | specific characteristics | different cultures | different cultures | frameworks for assessing how to approach a work assignment in a different culture | frameworks for assessing how to approach a work assignment in a different culture | one culture | one culture | different culture | different culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.996 Cross-Cultural Leadership (MIT) 15.996 Cross-Cultural Leadership (MIT)

Description

Cross Cultural Leadership is a collaborative research seminar that examines what constitutes "effective" leadership across cultures. It is collaborative because the students are expected to provide some of the content. The weekly readings target particular aspects of cultural differentiation. Working within those topics, students are asked to describe aspects of leadership in particular cultures based on their research and/or personal experiences. The goal of the course is to help prepare students for business assignments outside of their native countries. Course deliverables include: active participation in the class, contribution of class content on a weekly basis and an end of course paper that explores some aspect of leadership across cultures. Cross Cultural Leadership is a collaborative research seminar that examines what constitutes "effective" leadership across cultures. It is collaborative because the students are expected to provide some of the content. The weekly readings target particular aspects of cultural differentiation. Working within those topics, students are asked to describe aspects of leadership in particular cultures based on their research and/or personal experiences. The goal of the course is to help prepare students for business assignments outside of their native countries. Course deliverables include: active participation in the class, contribution of class content on a weekly basis and an end of course paper that explores some aspect of leadership across cultures.

Subjects

"effective" leadership across cultures | "effective" leadership across cultures | skills and behaviors | skills and behaviors | effective leadership characteristics | effective leadership characteristics | one culture; different culture | one culture; different culture | specific characteristics | specific characteristics | different cultures | different cultures | frameworks for assessing how to approach a work assignment in a different culture | frameworks for assessing how to approach a work assignment in a different culture | one culture | one culture | different culture | different culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT) 21F.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons. The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | globalization | society | society | geography | geography | america | america | europe | europe | asia | asia | africa | africa | third worrld | third worrld | development | development | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | religion | religion | politics | politics | youth | youth | developing nation | developing nation | first world | first world | cosmopolitan culture | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | global youth culture | religious movements | religious movements | social movements | social movements | political movements | political movements | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | political cartoons | political cartoons | Japan | Japan | popular culture | popular culture | world hip-hop | world hip-hop | rap | rap | media power | media power | consumer activism | consumer activism | third world | third world

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT) 21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons. The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | globalization | society | society | geography | geography | america | america | europe | europe | asia | asia | africa | africa | third worrld | third worrld | development | development | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | religion | religion | politics | politics | youth | youth | developing nation | developing nation | first world | first world | cosmopolitan culture | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | global youth culture | religious movements | religious movements | social movements | social movements | political movements | political movements | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | political cartoons | political cartoons | Japan | Japan | popular culture | popular culture | world hip-hop | world hip-hop | rap | rap | media power | media power | consumer activism | consumer activism | third world | third world | 21F.035 | 21F.035 | 21F.037 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT) 21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons. The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | globalization | society | society | geography | geography | america | america | europe | europe | asia | asia | africa | africa | third worrld | third worrld | development | development | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | religion | religion | politics | politics | youth | youth | developing nation | developing nation | first world | first world | cosmopolitan culture | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | global youth culture | religious movements | religious movements | social movements | social movements | political movements | political movements | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | political cartoons | political cartoons | Japan | Japan | popular culture | popular culture | world hip-hop | world hip-hop | rap | rap | media power | media power | consumer activism | consumer activism | third world | third world | 21F.035 | 21F.035 | 21F.037 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT) 21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons. The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | globalization | society | society | geography | geography | america | america | europe | europe | asia | asia | africa | africa | third worrld | third worrld | development | development | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | religion | religion | politics | politics | youth | youth | developing nation | developing nation | first world | first world | cosmopolitan culture | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | global youth culture | religious movements | religious movements | social movements | social movements | political movements | political movements | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | political cartoons | political cartoons | Japan | Japan | popular culture | popular culture | world hip-hop | world hip-hop | rap | rap | media power | media power | consumer activism | consumer activism | third world | third world | 21F.035 | 21F.035 | 21F.037 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Furnishings and Domestic Culture in early Modern England Furnishings and Domestic Culture in early Modern England

Description

A seminar presentation on doctoral research, employing probate inventories for the Oxfordshire market town of Thame in the 17th century. A presentation of doctoral research to the Archaeology and Local History seminar series at Kellogg College in November 2011, outlining theoretical and methodological approaches to the interpretation of probate inventories and other contemporary evidence in order to describe the experience of essentially non-elite daily life in the early modern period, and the changes in domestic culture which indicate wider shifts in modes of consumption and social relationships. The research also aimed to develop a better understanding of the operation of domestic culture; an interrelationship of material, social and conceptual elements. A seminar presentation on doctoral research, employing probate inventories for the Oxfordshire market town of Thame in the 17th century. A presentation of doctoral research to the Archaeology and Local History seminar series at Kellogg College in November 2011, outlining theoretical and methodological approaches to the interpretation of probate inventories and other contemporary evidence in order to describe the experience of essentially non-elite daily life in the early modern period, and the changes in domestic culture which indicate wider shifts in modes of consumption and social relationships. The research also aimed to develop a better understanding of the operation of domestic culture; an interrelationship of material, social and conceptual elements.

Subjects

material culture | material culture | domestic culture | domestic culture | england | england | furnishings | furnishings | probate inventories | probate inventories | early modern | early modern | Oxfordshire | Oxfordshire | material culture | domestic culture | england | furnishings | probate inventories | early modern | Oxfordshire | material culture | domestic culture | england | furnishings | probate inventories | early modern | Oxfordshire

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Changing face of Art Journalism (1945-2011) The Changing face of Art Journalism (1945-2011)

Description

Peter Aspden, Arts Writer, Financial Times, gives a talk for the Reuters Institute on 22nd June 2011. Peter Aspden, Arts Writer, Financial Times, gives a talk for the Reuters Institute on 22nd June 2011.

Subjects

pop culture | pop culture | culture | culture | art | art | journalism | journalism | music | music | pop culture | culture | art | journalism | music | 2011-06-22 | pop culture | culture | art | journalism | music | 2011-06-22

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT) 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art. This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art | modern art | high art | high art | mass culture | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernist aesthetic | modernism | modernism | 19th Century Art | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | modernization | urbanization | urbanization | globalization | globalization | photography | photography | cinema | cinema | painting | painting | sculpture | sculpture | postmodernism | postmodernism | visual arts | visual arts | multimedia | multimedia | pop art | pop art | popular culture | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT) 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art. This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art | modern art | high art | high art | mass culture | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernist aesthetic | modernism | modernism | 19th Century Art | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | modernization | urbanization | urbanization | globalization | globalization | photography | photography | cinema | cinema | painting | painting | sculpture | sculpture | postmodernism | postmodernism | visual arts | visual arts | multimedia | multimedia | pop art | pop art | popular culture | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT) 21F.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21F.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in the fields of poet 21F.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in the fields of poet

Subjects

avante garde | avante garde | kulturindustrie | kulturindustrie | germany | germany | asia | asia | latin america | latin america | africa | africa | europe | europe | culture | culture | consumer | consumer | history | history | politics | politics | Adorno | Adorno | Aragon | Aragon | Bataille | Bataille | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Breton | Breton | B?rger | B?rger | Duchamp | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Eisenstein | Ernst | Ernst | J?nger | J?nger | Greenberg | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Kandinsky | Malevich | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Mayakovsky | Tzara | Tzara | cinema | cinema | movies | movies | film | film | music | music | literature | literature | French culture | French culture | German culture | German culture | 20th century | 20th century | twentieth century | twentieth century | surrealism | surrealism | dadaism | dadaism | art history | art history | France | France | art movements | art movements | futurism | futurism | 21F.031 | 21F.031 | 4.608 | 4.608

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT) 21F.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries. This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries.

Subjects

japan | japan | popular culture | popular culture | media | media | capitalism | capitalism | comics | comics | hip-hop | hip-hop | music | music | animation | animation | movie | movie | sports | sports | sexuality | sexuality | race | race | gender | gender | fan communities | fan communities | culture | culture | manga | manga | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | anime | anime | Japanese animated films | Japanese animated films | power | power | global culture industries | global culture industries

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT) 21G.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries. This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries.

Subjects

japan | japan | popular culture | popular culture | media | media | capitalism | capitalism | comics | comics | hip-hop | hip-hop | music | music | animation | animation | movie | movie | sports | sports | sexuality | sexuality | race | race | gender | gender | fan communities | fan communities | culture | culture | manga | manga | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | anime | anime | Japanese animated films | Japanese animated films | power | power | global culture industries | global culture industries | 21F.039 | 21F.039 | 21F.037 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT) 21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X: This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X:

Subjects

chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | language | language | chinese | chinese | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | conversation | conversation | culture | culture | writing | writing | china | china | custom | custom | society | society | aural comprehension | aural comprehension | common compounds | common compounds | composition | composition | conversational fluency | conversational fluency | grammar | grammar | language laboratory | language laboratory | reading competence | reading competence | simplified characters | simplified characters | oral exercises | oral exercises | vocabulary | vocabulary | writing exercises | writing exercises | traditional characters | traditional characters | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese society | Chinese society

License

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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT) 21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary

Subjects

Cross-cultural | Cross-cultural | business | business | science | science | technology | technology | communication styles | communication styles | communication techniques | communication techniques | cultural norms | cultural norms | tradition | tradition | communication | communication | culture | culture | verbal communication | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | argumentation | negotiation | negotiation | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | Asian culture | European culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.019 | 21F.021 | 21F.021

License

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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT) 21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary

Subjects

Cross-cultural | Cross-cultural | business | business | science | science | technology | technology | communication styles | communication styles | communication techniques | communication techniques | cultural norms | cultural norms | tradition | tradition | communication | communication | culture | culture | verbal communication | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | argumentation | negotiation | negotiation | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | Asian culture | European culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.019 | 21F.021 | 21F.021

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT) 21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts--or for that matter, people--we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its prima It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts--or for that matter, people--we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its prima

Subjects

Cross-cultural | Cross-cultural | business | business | science | science | technology | technology | communication styles | communication styles | communication techniques | communication techniques | cultural norms | cultural norms | tradition | tradition | communication | communication | culture | culture | verbal communication | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | argumentation | negotiation | negotiation | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | Asian culture | European culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.019 | 21F.021 | 21F.021

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.030 East Asian Culture: From Zen to K-Pop (MIT) 21G.030 East Asian Culture: From Zen to K-Pop (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to various forms of culture in East Asia (focusing on China, Japan and Korea), including both traditional and contemporary examples. Critically examines the shared cultural elements that are widely considered to constitute "East Asian culture," and also the diversity within East Asia, historically and today. Examples include religious and philosophical beliefs (Confucianism and Buddhism), literature, art, food, architecture, and popular culture. The study of gender will be an integral part of this subject. The influence and presence of Asian cultural expressions in the U.S. are also considered. This class is suitable for students of all levels, and requires no Asian language background. Students who wish to fulfill the MISTI-Singapore requirement m This subject is an introduction to various forms of culture in East Asia (focusing on China, Japan and Korea), including both traditional and contemporary examples. Critically examines the shared cultural elements that are widely considered to constitute "East Asian culture," and also the diversity within East Asia, historically and today. Examples include religious and philosophical beliefs (Confucianism and Buddhism), literature, art, food, architecture, and popular culture. The study of gender will be an integral part of this subject. The influence and presence of Asian cultural expressions in the U.S. are also considered. This class is suitable for students of all levels, and requires no Asian language background. Students who wish to fulfill the MISTI-Singapore requirement m

Subjects

East Asia | East Asia | East Asian Cultures | East Asian Cultures | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Japanese culture | Japanese culture | Korean culture | Korean culture | cultural antropology | cultural antropology | foodways | foodways | East Asian Studies | East Asian Studies | traditional East Asian studies | traditional East Asian studies | contemporary East Asian studies | contemporary East Asian studies | Confucianism | Confucianism | Buddhism | Buddhism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT) 21G.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21G.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in th 21G.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in th

Subjects

21G.031 | 21G.031 | 4.608 | 4.608 | avante garde | avante garde | kulturindustrie | kulturindustrie | germany | germany | asia | asia | latin america | latin america | africa | africa | europe | europe | culture | culture | consumer | consumer | history | history | politics | politics | Adorno | Adorno | Aragon | Aragon | Bataille | Bataille | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Breton | Breton | B?rger | B?rger | Duchamp | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Eisenstein | Ernst | Ernst | J?nger | J?nger | Greenberg | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Kandinsky | Malevich | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Mayakovsky | Tzara | Tzara | cinema | cinema | movies | movies | film | film | music | music | literature | literature | French culture | French culture | German culture | German culture | 20th century | 20th century | twentieth century | twentieth century | surrealism | surrealism | dadaism | dadaism | art history | art history | France | France | art movements | art movements | futurism | futurism | 21F.031J | 21F.031J | 21F.031 | 21F.031

License

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11.123 Big Plans (MIT) 11.123 Big Plans (MIT)

Description

This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered. This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered.

Subjects

large projects | large projects | debate and commitment in advance of action | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | technology | politics | politics | economics | economics | culture | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | ways of generating public support | ways of generating public support | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | environmental impacts | environmental impacts | political accountability | political accountability | health and safety factors | health and safety factors | social equity | social equity | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT) 21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both pre-modern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.). Each week we will analyze a specific cultural phenomenon, or aspect of material culture, from China, Japan or Korea in order to gain insights into the cultures of these countries. We will also consider the central influence of major philosophical systems such as Confucianism and Buddhism on East Asian cultures. A comparative perspective will be employed to examine the cultural links, and the cultural differences between these three countries of East Asia (as well as Hong Kong and Taiwan). The course will also introduce students to a variety of methodologies for the study of culture (e. g. cultu The course examines various aspects of culture in both pre-modern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.). Each week we will analyze a specific cultural phenomenon, or aspect of material culture, from China, Japan or Korea in order to gain insights into the cultures of these countries. We will also consider the central influence of major philosophical systems such as Confucianism and Buddhism on East Asian cultures. A comparative perspective will be employed to examine the cultural links, and the cultural differences between these three countries of East Asia (as well as Hong Kong and Taiwan). The course will also introduce students to a variety of methodologies for the study of culture (e. g. cultu

Subjects

East Asia | East Asia | culture | culture | literature | literature | art | art | performance | performance | food | food | religion | religion | popular culture | popular culture | film | film | pop music | pop music | karaoke | karaoke | manga | manga | China | China | Japan | Japan | Korea | Korea | Taiwan | Taiwan | Hong Kong | Hong Kong | women's culture | women's culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT) 21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience—specifically, prose that is both critical and personal, that features your ideas, your perspective, and your voice to engage readers. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that critically engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of pieces that address current issues in popular culture. These readings will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal, attending always to the ways yo This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience—specifically, prose that is both critical and personal, that features your ideas, your perspective, and your voice to engage readers. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that critically engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of pieces that address current issues in popular culture. These readings will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal, attending always to the ways yo

Subjects

contemporary | contemporary | contemporary issues | contemporary issues | culture | culture | culture shock | culture shock | urban and environmental crises | urban and environmental crises | economic imperialism | economic imperialism | sexual and reproductive politics | sexual and reproductive politics | the ethics of biotechnologies | the ethics of biotechnologies | issues of race and gender | issues of race and gender | the romance of technology | the romance of technology | robotics and cyborg cultures | robotics and cyborg cultures | media saturation | media saturation | language and representation | language and representation | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | Honeymoon Phase | Honeymoon Phase | Negotiation Phase | Negotiation Phase | Adjustment Phase | Adjustment Phase | Reverse Culture Shock | Reverse Culture Shock | anxiety | anxiety | feelings | feelings | surprise | surprise | disorientation | disorientation | uncertainty | uncertainty | confusion | confusion | assimilating | assimilating | current | current

License

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21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) 21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of culture. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, theatrical, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. Over the course of the semester we explore different theoretical perspectives on the role and power of media in society in influencing our social values, political beliefs, identities Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of culture. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, theatrical, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. Over the course of the semester we explore different theoretical perspectives on the role and power of media in society in influencing our social values, political beliefs, identities

Subjects

literature | literature | comparative mass media | comparative mass media | communication | communication | modern culture | modern culture | social values | social values | politics | politics | radio | radio | television | television | film | film | print | print | digital techonology | digital techonology | history | history | storytelling | storytelling | advertising | advertising | oral | oral | culture | culture | photography | photography | oral culture | oral culture | cultural forms | cultural forms | political beliefs | political beliefs | economics | economics | mediated communication | mediated communication | class politics | class politics | gender | gender | race | race | identity | identity | behavior | behavior | criticism | criticism | global multimedia environment | global multimedia environment | consumers | consumers | theatrical | theatrical | photographic | photographic | broadcast | broadcast | cinematic | cinematic | cinema | cinema | theatre | theatre | printing | printing | publishing | publishing | books | books | electronic | electronic | transformations | transformations | narrative | narrative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.123 Big Plans (MIT) 11.123 Big Plans (MIT)

Description

This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered. This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered.

Subjects

large projects | large projects | debate and commitment in advance of action | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | technology | politics | politics | economics | economics | culture | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | ways of generating public support | ways of generating public support | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | environmental impacts | environmental impacts | political accountability | political accountability | health and safety factors | health and safety factors | social equity | social equity | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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