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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

License

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

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18.783 Elliptic Curves (MIT) 18.783 Elliptic Curves (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a computationally focused introduction to elliptic curves, with applications to number theory and cryptography. This graduate-level course is a computationally focused introduction to elliptic curves, with applications to number theory and cryptography.

Subjects

elliptic curves | elliptic curves | number theory | number theory | cryptography | cryptography | point-counting | point-counting | isogenies | isogenies | pairings | pairings | theory of complex multiplication | theory of complex multiplication | integer factorization | integer factorization | primality proving | primality proving | elliptic curve cryptography | elliptic curve cryptography | modular curves | modular curves | Fermat's Last Theorem | Fermat's Last Theorem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.783 Elliptic Curves (MIT) 18.783 Elliptic Curves (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a computationally focused introduction to elliptic curves, with applications to number theory and cryptography. This graduate-level course is a computationally focused introduction to elliptic curves, with applications to number theory and cryptography.

Subjects

elliptic curves | elliptic curves | number theory | number theory | cryptography | cryptography | point-counting | point-counting | isogenies | isogenies | pairings | pairings | theory of complex multiplication | theory of complex multiplication | integer factorization | integer factorization | primality proving | primality proving | elliptic curve cryptography | elliptic curve cryptography | modular curves | modular curves | Fermat's Last Theorem | Fermat's Last Theorem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.783 Elliptic Curves (MIT) 18.783 Elliptic Curves (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a computationally focused introduction to elliptic curves, with applications to number theory and cryptography. This graduate-level course is a computationally focused introduction to elliptic curves, with applications to number theory and cryptography.

Subjects

elliptic curves | elliptic curves | number theory | number theory | cryptography | cryptography | point-counting | point-counting | isogenies | isogenies | pairings | pairings | theory of complex multiplication | theory of complex multiplication | integer factorization | integer factorization | primality proving | primality proving | elliptic curve cryptography | elliptic curve cryptography | modular curves | modular curves | Fermat's Last Theorem | Fermat's Last Theorem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.725 Algebraic Geometry (MIT) 18.725 Algebraic Geometry (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field. It also analyzes the relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties. This course covers the fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field. It also analyzes the relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties.

Subjects

algebraic varieties over algebraically closed field | algebraic varieties over algebraically closed field | complex algebraic varieties | complex algebraic varieties | complex analytic varieties | complex analytic varieties | curves and surfaces | curves and surfaces | irreducible components | irreducible components | projective space | projective space | topological diversion | topological diversion | sheaves | sheaves | presheaves | presheaves | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | fibers | fibers | morphisms | morphisms | varieties | varieties | projective varieties | projective varieties | applications | applications | dimension | dimension | krull dimension | krull dimension | completeness | completeness | complex topology | complex topology | Chow's lemma | Chow's lemma | analytic spaces | analytic spaces | curves | curves

License

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18.782 Introduction to Arithmetic Geometry (MIT) 18.782 Introduction to Arithmetic Geometry (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to arithmetic geometry, a subject that lies at the intersection of algebraic geometry and number theory. Its primary motivation is the study of classical Diophantine problems from the modern perspective of algebraic geometry. This course is an introduction to arithmetic geometry, a subject that lies at the intersection of algebraic geometry and number theory. Its primary motivation is the study of classical Diophantine problems from the modern perspective of algebraic geometry.

Subjects

algebra | algebra | number theory | number theory | diophantine equations | diophantine equations | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | plane conics | plane conics | elliptic curves | elliptic curves | hyperelliptic curves | hyperelliptic curves | abelian varieties | abelian varieties | Tate-Shafarevich group | Tate-Shafarevich group

License

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18.783 Elliptic Curves (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a computationally focused introduction to elliptic curves, with applications to number theory and cryptography.

Subjects

elliptic curves | number theory | cryptography | point-counting | isogenies | pairings | theory of complex multiplication | integer factorization | primality proving | elliptic curve cryptography | modular curves | Fermat's Last Theorem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

Microeconomics | prices | normative economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | supply | demand | equilibrium | demand shift | supply shift | government interference | elasticity | revenue | empirical economics | consumer theory | preference assumptions | indifference curves | utility functions | marginal utility | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | Engel curves | income effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | labor economics | child labor | producer theory | variable inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | productivity | perfect competition | search theory | residual demand | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | agency problem | welfare economics | consumer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | monopoly | oligopoly | market power | price discrimination | price regulation | antitrust policy | mergers | cartel | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | international trade | uncertainty | capital markets | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | compounding | inflation | investment | discount rate | net present value | income distribution | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social security | moral hazard | taxation | EITC | healthcare | PPACA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | optimization | allocation | economic measurement | analysis | microeconomics | demand | supply | equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer preference | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | interior solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | individual demand | market demand | revealed preferences | substitution effect | income effect | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | network externalities | uncertainty | preference toward risk | risk premium | indifference curves | diversification | insurance | producer theory | production functions | short run | long run | returns to scale | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scope | learning | profit maximization | producer surplus | agricultural price support | tax | subsidy | exchange economy | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | monopoly | multiplant firm | social cost | price regulation | monopsony | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | bundling | monopolistic competition | game theory | oligopoly | Cournot | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.783 Elliptic Curves (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a computationally focused introduction to elliptic curves, with applications to number theory and cryptography.

Subjects

elliptic curves | number theory | cryptography | point-counting | isogenies | pairings | theory of complex multiplication | integer factorization | primality proving | elliptic curve cryptography | modular curves | Fermat's Last Theorem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.783 Elliptic Curves (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a computationally focused introduction to elliptic curves, with applications to number theory and cryptography.

Subjects

elliptic curves | number theory | cryptography | point-counting | isogenies | pairings | theory of complex multiplication | integer factorization | primality proving | elliptic curve cryptography | modular curves | Fermat's Last Theorem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.42 Environmental Policy and Economics (MIT) 14.42 Environmental Policy and Economics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? Students will help design and execute a cutting edge research project that tests whether air pollution causes infant mortality. To gain real world experience, the course will include a guest lecture from a former EPA plant inspector and is tentatively scheduled to include a visit to a local polluting plant. This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? Students will help design and execute a cutting edge research project that tests whether air pollution causes infant mortality. To gain real world experience, the course will include a guest lecture from a former EPA plant inspector and is tentatively scheduled to include a visit to a local polluting plant.

Subjects

economics | economics | policy | policy | environment | environment | environmental economics | environmental economics | public policy | public policy | cost-benefit analysis | cost-benefit analysis | resource management | resource management | government | government | safety | safety | health | health | regulation | regulation | sustainability | sustainability | public goods | public goods | pollution | pollution | taxes | taxes | green | green | risk | risk | liability | liability | industry | industry | kuznets curves | kuznets curves | trade | trade | competition | competition | growth | growth | double dividend | double dividend | accounting | accounting | hedonic | hedonic | valuation | valuation | global warming | global warming | cost | cost

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.620J Classical Mechanics: A Computational Approach (MIT) 12.620J Classical Mechanics: A Computational Approach (MIT)

Description

12.620J covers the fundamental principles of classical mechanics, with a modern emphasis on the qualitative structure of phase space. The course uses computational ideas to formulate the principles of mechanics precisely. Expression in a computational framework encourages clear thinking and active exploration.The following topics are covered: the Lagrangian formulation, action, variational principles, and equations of motion, Hamilton's principle, conserved quantities, rigid bodies and tops, Hamiltonian formulation and canonical equations, surfaces of section, chaos, canonical transformations and generating functions, Liouville's theorem and Poincaré integral invariants, Poincaré-Birkhoff and KAM theorems, invariant curves and cantori, nonlinear resonances, resonance ov 12.620J covers the fundamental principles of classical mechanics, with a modern emphasis on the qualitative structure of phase space. The course uses computational ideas to formulate the principles of mechanics precisely. Expression in a computational framework encourages clear thinking and active exploration.The following topics are covered: the Lagrangian formulation, action, variational principles, and equations of motion, Hamilton's principle, conserved quantities, rigid bodies and tops, Hamiltonian formulation and canonical equations, surfaces of section, chaos, canonical transformations and generating functions, Liouville's theorem and Poincaré integral invariants, Poincaré-Birkhoff and KAM theorems, invariant curves and cantori, nonlinear resonances, resonance ov

Subjects

classical mechanics | classical mechanics | phase space | phase space | computation | computation | Lagrangian formulation | Lagrangian formulation | action | action | variational principles | variational principles | equations of motion | equations of motion | Hamilton's principle | Hamilton's principle | conserved quantities | conserved quantities | rigid bodies and tops | rigid bodies and tops | Hamiltonian formulation | Hamiltonian formulation | canonical equations | canonical equations | surfaces of section | surfaces of section | chaos | chaos | canonical transformations | canonical transformations | generating functions | generating functions | Liouville's theorem | Liouville's theorem | Poincar? integral invariants | Poincar? integral invariants | Poincar?-Birkhoff | Poincar?-Birkhoff | KAM theorem | KAM theorem | invariant curves | invariant curves | cantori | cantori | nonlinear resonances | nonlinear resonances | resonance overlap | resonance overlap | transition to chaos | transition to chaos | chaotic motion | chaotic motion | 12.620 | 12.620 | 6.946 | 6.946 | 8.351 | 8.351

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.101 Introductory Analog Electronics Laboratory (MIT) 6.101 Introductory Analog Electronics Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.101 is an introductory electronics laboratory. Students learn about the basic principles of analog circuit design and operation in a practical, real-world laboratory setting. They work both with discrete components such as resistors, capacitors, diodes, and transistors as well as with integrated components such as operational amplifiers. In addition, they become familiar with the operation of basic electronic test equipment (digital multimeters, oscilloscopes, function generators, curve tracers, etc.). There are six labs due weekly which start out as cookbook types and progress to design exercises; there are group design projects for the second half of the term. 6.101 is an introductory electronics laboratory. Students learn about the basic principles of analog circuit design and operation in a practical, real-world laboratory setting. They work both with discrete components such as resistors, capacitors, diodes, and transistors as well as with integrated components such as operational amplifiers. In addition, they become familiar with the operation of basic electronic test equipment (digital multimeters, oscilloscopes, function generators, curve tracers, etc.). There are six labs due weekly which start out as cookbook types and progress to design exercises; there are group design projects for the second half of the term.

Subjects

analog electronics laboratory | analog electronics laboratory | analog circuit design | analog circuit design | resistor | capacitor | resistor | capacitor | diode | diode | transistor | transistor | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | electronic test equipment | electronic test equipment | digital multimeter | digital multimeter | oscilloscope | oscilloscope | function generator | function generator | curve tracer | curve tracer | resistor | resistor | capacitor | capacitor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT) 6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.002 introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

circuit | circuit | electronic | electronic | abstraction | abstraction | lumped circuit | lumped circuit | digital | digital | amplifier | amplifier | differential equations | differential equations | time behavior | time behavior | energy storage | energy storage | semiconductor diode | semiconductor diode | field-effect | field-effect | field-effect transistor | field-effect transistor | resistor | resistor | source | source | inductor | inductor | capacitor | capacitor | diode | diode | series-parallel reduction | series-parallel reduction | voltage | voltage | current divider | current divider | node method | node method | linearity | linearity | superposition | superposition | Thevenin-Norton equivalent | Thevenin-Norton equivalent | power flow | power flow | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | binary signal | binary signal | MOSFET | MOSFET | noise margin | noise margin | singularity functions | singularity functions | sinusoidal-steady-state | sinusoidal-steady-state | impedance | impedance | frequency response curves | frequency response curves | operational amplifier | operational amplifier | Op-Amp | Op-Amp | negative feedback | negative feedback | positive feedback | positive feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.033 Relativity (MIT) 8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay. Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay.

Subjects

Einstein's postulates | Einstein's postulates | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects and paradoxes | relativistic effects and paradoxes | Minkowski diagrams | Minkowski diagrams | invariants and four-vectors | invariants and four-vectors | momentum | energy and mass | momentum | energy and mass | particle collisions | particle collisions | Relativity and electricity | Relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | General Relativity | General Relativity | principle of equivalence | principle of equivalence | the Schwarzchild metric | the Schwarzchild metric | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | gravitational red shift | particle trajectories | particle trajectories | light trajectories | light trajectories | invariants | invariants | four-vectors | four-vectors | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | mass | mass | relativistic effects | relativistic effects | paradoxes | paradoxes | electricity | electricity | time dilation | time dilation | length contraction | length contraction | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | Schwarzchild metric | Schwarzchild metric | geodesics | geodesics | Shaprio delay | Shaprio delay | relativistic kinematics | relativistic kinematics | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | hubble expansion | hubble expansion | universe | universe | equivalence principle | equivalence principle | curved space time | curved space time | Ether Theory | Ether Theory | constants | constants | speed of light | speed of light | c | c | graph | graph | pythagorem theorem | pythagorem theorem | triangle | triangle | arrows | arrows

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13.400 Introduction to Naval Architecture (MIT) 13.400 Introduction to Naval Architecture (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to principles of naval architecture, ship geometry, hydrostatics, calculation and drawing of curves of form. It also explores concepts of  intact and damaged stability, hull structure strength calculations and ship resistance. Projects include analysis of ship lines drawings and ship model testing. This course is an introduction to principles of naval architecture, ship geometry, hydrostatics, calculation and drawing of curves of form. It also explores concepts of  intact and damaged stability, hull structure strength calculations and ship resistance. Projects include analysis of ship lines drawings and ship model testing.

Subjects

elementary principles of Naval Architecture | elementary principles of Naval Architecture | naval architecture tools | naval architecture tools | ship geometry | ship geometry | hydrostatics | hydrostatics | calculation | calculation | drawing | drawing | curves of form | curves of form | intact and damaged stability | intact and damaged stability | hull structure strength calculations | hull structure strength calculations | ship resistance | ship resistance | ship model testing | ship model testing | 2.701 | 2.701

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13.024 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT) 13.024 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.Technical RequirementMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. The .FIN and .OUT are simply data offest tables. They can be viewed with any text reader. RealOne™ This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.Technical RequirementMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. The .FIN and .OUT are simply data offest tables. They can be viewed with any text reader. RealOne™

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | interpolation | interpolation | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration | systems of linear equations | systems of linear equations | differential equations | differential equations | numerical integration | numerical integration | partial differential | partial differential | boundary integral equation panel methods | boundary integral equation panel methods | deterministic and random sea waves | deterministic and random sea waves | Fast Fourier Transforms | Fast Fourier Transforms | finite difference methods | finite difference methods | Integral boundary layer equations | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical lifting surface computations | numerical lifting surface computations | Numerical representation | Numerical representation | numerical solutions | numerical solutions | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | incompressible fluid mechanics | incompressible fluid mechanics | calculus | calculus | complex numbers | complex numbers | root finding | root finding | curve fitting | curve fitting | numerical differentiation | numerical differentiation | numerical errors | numerical errors | panel methods | panel methods | oscillating rigid objects | oscillating rigid objects | 2.29 | 2.29

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17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT) 17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT)

Description

This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed. This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed.

Subjects

social action | social action | rational choice | rational choice | riots | riots | rebellions | rebellions | revolutions | revolutions | rationality | rationality | j-curve | j-curve | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | peasant movement | peasant movement | Vietnam | Vietnam | politics | politics | insurgency | insurgency | civil war | civil war | ethnicity | ethnicity | race riot | race riot | urban riot | urban riot | Rodney King | Rodney King | relative deprivation | relative deprivation | Spilerman | Spilerman | racial disturbances | racial disturbances | protest | protest | nationalist violence | nationalist violence | USSR | USSR | Balkans | Balkans | ethnic polarization | ethnic polarization | Kosovo | Kosovo | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Mali | Mali

License

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4.105 Geometric Disciplines and Architecture Skills: Reciprocal Methodologies (MIT) 4.105 Geometric Disciplines and Architecture Skills: Reciprocal Methodologies (MIT)

Description

This course is an intensive introduction to architectural design tools and process, and is taught through a series of short exercises. The conceptual basis of each exercise is in the interrogation of the geometric principles that lie at the core of each skill. Skills covered in this course range from techniques of hand drafting, to generation of 3D computer models, physical model-building, sketching, and diagramming. Weekly lectures and pin-ups address the conventions associated with modes of architectural representation and their capacity to convey ideas. This course is tailored and offered only to first-year M.Arch students. This course is an intensive introduction to architectural design tools and process, and is taught through a series of short exercises. The conceptual basis of each exercise is in the interrogation of the geometric principles that lie at the core of each skill. Skills covered in this course range from techniques of hand drafting, to generation of 3D computer models, physical model-building, sketching, and diagramming. Weekly lectures and pin-ups address the conventions associated with modes of architectural representation and their capacity to convey ideas. This course is tailored and offered only to first-year M.Arch students.

Subjects

geometry | geometry | representation | representation | architecture | architecture | drawing | drawing | projection | projection | perspective | perspective | planes | planes | axonometric | axonometric | stereotomy | stereotomy | volume | volume | surface | surface | curvature | curvature | curves | curves | discretization | discretization | generation | generation | construction | construction | publication | publication | presentation | presentation

License

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6.00SC Introduction to Computer Science and Programming (MIT) 6.00SC Introduction to Computer Science and Programming (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This subject is aimed at students with little or no programming experience. It aims to provide students with an understanding of the role computation can play in solving problems. It also aims to help students, regardless of their major, to feel justifiably confident of their ability to write small programs that allow them to accomplish useful goals. The class will use the Python programming language. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This subject is aimed at students with little or no programming experience. It aims to provide students with an understanding of the role computation can play in solving problems. It also aims to help students, regardless of their major, to feel justifiably confident of their ability to write small programs that allow them to accomplish useful goals. The class will use the Python programming language.

Subjects

Python programming | Python programming | algorithms | algorithms | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | object-oriented programming | object-oriented programming | debugging | debugging | problem solving | problem solving | recursion | recursion | iteration | iteration | search algorithms | search algorithms | program efficiency | program efficiency | order of growth | order of growth | memoization | memoization | hashing | hashing | object classes | object classes | inheritance | inheritance | Monte Carlo simulation | Monte Carlo simulation | curve fitting | curve fitting | optimization | optimization | clustering | clustering | queuing networks | queuing networks | data sampling | data sampling

License

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2.29 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (13.024) (MIT) 2.29 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (13.024) (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.024. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.024. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | interpolation | interpolation | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration | systems of linear equations | systems of linear equations | differential equations | differential equations | numerical integration | numerical integration | partial differential | partial differential | boundary integral equation panel methods | boundary integral equation panel methods | deterministic and random sea waves | deterministic and random sea waves | Fast Fourier Transforms | Fast Fourier Transforms | finite difference methods | finite difference methods | Integral boundary layer equations | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical lifting surface computations | numerical lifting surface computations | Numerical representation | Numerical representation | numerical solutions | numerical solutions | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | incompressible fluid mechanics | incompressible fluid mechanics | calculus | calculus | complex numbers | complex numbers | root finding | root finding | curve fitting | curve fitting | numerical differentiation | numerical differentiation | numerical errors | numerical errors | panel methods | panel methods | oscillating rigid objects | oscillating rigid objects

License

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1.060 Engineering Mechanics II (MIT) 1.060 Engineering Mechanics II (MIT)

Description

This subject provides an introduction to fluid mechanics. Students are introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of fluids and learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there is a chance to put skills from calculus and differential equations to use in this subject, the emphasis is on physical understanding of why a fluid behaves the way it does. The aim is to make the students think as a fluid. In addition to relating a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, the subject prepares students for higher-level subjects in fluid dynamics. This subject provides an introduction to fluid mechanics. Students are introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of fluids and learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there is a chance to put skills from calculus and differential equations to use in this subject, the emphasis is on physical understanding of why a fluid behaves the way it does. The aim is to make the students think as a fluid. In addition to relating a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, the subject prepares students for higher-level subjects in fluid dynamics.

Subjects

fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | fluids | fluids | civil and environmental engineering | civil and environmental engineering | differential equations | differential equations | calculus | calculus | flow | flow | movement | movement | wave forms | wave forms | Bernoulli's theorem | Bernoulli's theorem | wavelets | wavelets | mechanics | mechanics | solids | solids | hydrostatics | hydrostatics | mass | mass | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | flow nets | flow nets | velocity | velocity | laminar flow | laminar flow | turbulent flow | turbulent flow | groundwater | groundwater | hydraulics | hydraulics | backwater curves | backwater curves

License

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6.101 Introductory Analog Electronics Laboratory (MIT) 6.101 Introductory Analog Electronics Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.101 is an introductory experimental laboratory that explores the design, construction, and debugging of analog electronic circuits. Lectures and six laboratory projects investigate the performance characteristics of diodes, transistors, JFETs, and op-amps, including the construction of a small audio amplifier and preamplifier. Seven weeks are devoted to the design and implementation, and written and oral presentation of a project in an environment similar to that of engineering design teams in industry. The course provides opportunity to simulate real-world problems and solutions that involve trade offs and the use of engineering judgment. Engineers from local analog engineering companies come to campus to help students with their design projects. 6.101 is an introductory experimental laboratory that explores the design, construction, and debugging of analog electronic circuits. Lectures and six laboratory projects investigate the performance characteristics of diodes, transistors, JFETs, and op-amps, including the construction of a small audio amplifier and preamplifier. Seven weeks are devoted to the design and implementation, and written and oral presentation of a project in an environment similar to that of engineering design teams in industry. The course provides opportunity to simulate real-world problems and solutions that involve trade offs and the use of engineering judgment. Engineers from local analog engineering companies come to campus to help students with their design projects.

Subjects

analog electronic circuits | analog electronic circuits | diode characteristics | diode characteristics | transistors | transistors | JFETs | JFETs | op-amps | op-amps | audio amplifier | audio amplifier | preamplifier | preamplifier | audio and radio frequency circuits | audio and radio frequency circuits | electronic test equipment | electronic test equipment | digital multimeter | digital multimeter | oscilloscope | oscilloscope | function generator | function generator | curve tracer | curve tracer

License

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