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Catalyst for Change: A good death

Description

Section 3 - A Good Death

Subjects

medev | ooer | ukoer | death | terminal illness | preparing for death | end of life | patient experience | good death | end of life pathways | dentistry | A000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Living with death and dying

Description

This unit will explore how knowledge and beliefs about death and encounters with death affect people’s lives. It will also examine the concept of a ‘good death’ from an individual perspective in order to enhance the quality of dying.

Subjects

bad_deaths | health and lifestyle | beliefs | death | dying | good_death | myths | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.343 The Radical Consequences of Respiration: Reactive Oxygen Species in Aging and Disease (MIT) 7.343 The Radical Consequences of Respiration: Reactive Oxygen Species in Aging and Disease (MIT)

Description

This course will start with a survey of basic oxygen radical biochemistry followed by a discussion of the mechanisms of action of cellular as well as dietary antioxidants. After considering the normal physiological roles of oxidants, we will examine the effects of elevated ROS and a failure of cellular redox capacity on the rate of organismal and cellular aging as well as on the onset and progression of several major diseases that are often age-related. Topics will include ROS-induced effects on stem cell regeneration, insulin resistance, heart disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. The role of antioxidants in potential therapeutic strategies for modulating ROS levels will also be discussed. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology D This course will start with a survey of basic oxygen radical biochemistry followed by a discussion of the mechanisms of action of cellular as well as dietary antioxidants. After considering the normal physiological roles of oxidants, we will examine the effects of elevated ROS and a failure of cellular redox capacity on the rate of organismal and cellular aging as well as on the onset and progression of several major diseases that are often age-related. Topics will include ROS-induced effects on stem cell regeneration, insulin resistance, heart disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. The role of antioxidants in potential therapeutic strategies for modulating ROS levels will also be discussed. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology D

Subjects

reactive oxygen species | reactive oxygen species | oxygen | oxygen | ROS | ROS | energy | energy | mitochondria | mitochondria | cell signaling | cell signaling | anti-pathogen | anti-pathogen | oxidative damage | oxidative damage | oncogene | oncogene | antioxidant | antioxidant | insulin resistance | insulin resistance | diabetes | diabetes | stem cell | stem cell | neurodegenerative | neurodegenerative | ischemic | ischemic | ATP | ATP | pathways | pathways | NADPH | NADPH | nox | nox | psd | psd | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | apoptosis | apoptosis | hsc | hsc | hematopoietic | hematopoietic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Death and medicine: Postponement and promise Death and medicine: Postponement and promise

Description

This free course, Death and medicine: Postponement and promise, asks the reader to consider the experience of grief and bereavement and in particular the extent to which grieving people need professional help. The course considers the evidence for the effects of grief and the extent to which current ways of responding are helpful. First published on Fri, 12 Feb 2016 as Death and medicine: Postponement and promise. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Death and medicine: Postponement and promise, asks the reader to consider the experience of grief and bereavement and in particular the extent to which grieving people need professional help. The course considers the evidence for the effects of grief and the extent to which current ways of responding are helpful. First published on Fri, 12 Feb 2016 as Death and medicine: Postponement and promise. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Social Care | Social Care | bereavement | bereavement | death | death | dying | dying

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Autophagy

Description

Dr Katja Simon tells us about her research on autophagy in red blood cells. Autophagy is the cellular process in which cells degrade their toxic waste and damaged organelles. Dr Katja Simon studies how the lack of autophagy seems to trigger DNA mutations and the development of leukemic cells. This might help us make better use of current therapies and develop new ones. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

cell death | tolerance | tumour immunity | autophagy | cell death | tolerance | tumour immunity | autophagy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT) 7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT)

Description

In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f

Subjects

cell | cell | genetic material | genetic material | cell death | cell death | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | mutations | mutations | genes | genes | DNA replication | DNA replication | cell cycle | cell cycle | damaged DNA | damaged DNA | genome | genome | tumor formation | tumor formation | anti-cancer drugs | anti-cancer drugs | viruses | viruses | cellular controls | cellular controls

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.11 Special Topics in Economics: The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT) 14.11 Special Topics in Economics: The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT)

Description

This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, have had some economics, and believe that economists might have something useful to say about this question. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Does foreign aid help? What can we do about corruption? Should we leave it all to the markets? Should we leave it to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Where is the best place to intervene? How do we deal with the disease burden? How do we improve schools? And many others. This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, have had some economics, and believe that economists might have something useful to say about this question. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Does foreign aid help? What can we do about corruption? Should we leave it all to the markets? Should we leave it to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Where is the best place to intervene? How do we deal with the disease burden? How do we improve schools? And many others.

Subjects

challenge | challenge | world poverty | world poverty | economics | economics | per capita income | per capita income | health | health | fertility | fertility | mortality | mortality | birth | birth | death | death | microfinance | microfinance | NGOs | NGOs | poor | poor | education | education | colonialism | colonialism | globalization | globalization | corruption | corruption | India | India | Mexico | Mexico | United States | United States | economic growth | economic growth | development | development | credit markets | credit markets | prosperity | prosperity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT) 7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe

Subjects

ubiquitination | ubiquitination | ubiquitin | ubiquitin | proteasome | proteasome | post-translational mechanisms | post-translational mechanisms | ubiquitin-conjugation system | ubiquitin-conjugation system | neurodegenerative diseases | neurodegenerative diseases | immune response | immune response | cell cycle regulation | cell cycle regulation | apoptosis | apoptosis | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | protein degradation | protein degradation | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | ligases | ligases | translocated proteins | translocated proteins | misfolded proteins | misfolded proteins | trafficking membranes | trafficking membranes | cell cycle control | cell cycle control | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | Huntington's Disease | Huntington's Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 Cancer Biology: From Basic Research to the Clinic (MIT) 7.342 Cancer Biology: From Basic Research to the Clinic (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In 1971, President Nixon declared the "War on Cancer," but after three decades the war is still raging. How much progress have we made toward winning the war and what are we doing to improve the fight? Understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis is crucial to the development of innovative therapy for cancer patients. Insights into these processes have been gleaned through basic research using biochemical, molecular, and genetic ana This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In 1971, President Nixon declared the "War on Cancer," but after three decades the war is still raging. How much progress have we made toward winning the war and what are we doing to improve the fight? Understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis is crucial to the development of innovative therapy for cancer patients. Insights into these processes have been gleaned through basic research using biochemical, molecular, and genetic ana

Subjects

cancer | cancer | tumor | tumor | metastasis | metastasis | genetic analysis | genetic analysis | cancer biology | cancer biology | model organisms | model organisms | genetic pathways | genetic pathways | uncontrolled growth | uncontrolled growth | tumor suppressor genes | tumor suppressor genes | oncogenes | oncogenes | tumor initiation | tumor initiation | cell cycle | cell cycle | chromosomal aberration | chromosomal aberration | apoptosis | apoptosis | cell death | cell death | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | proto-oncogene | proto-oncogene | mutation | mutation | DNA mismatch repair | DNA mismatch repair | telomeres | telomeres | mouse models | mouse models | tissue specificity | tissue specificity | malignancy | malignancy | stem cells | stem cells | therapeutic resistance | therapeutic resistance | differentiation | differentiation | caner research | caner research | cancer therapeutics | cancer therapeutics | chemotherapy | chemotherapy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement Debate 2: Euthanasia

Description

The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement: Euthanasia. Julian Savulescu and Charles Camosy held two public debates in Michaelmas Term 2012 under the series title 'The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | death | philosophy | euthanasia | ethics | morality | uehiro | death | philosophy | euthanasia | ethics | morality

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.343 Protein Folding, Misfolding and Human Disease (MIT) 7.343 Protein Folding, Misfolding and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. The instructor for this course, Dr. Kosinski-Collins, is a member of the HHMI Education Group. Maintenance of the complex three-dimensional structure adopted by a protein in the cell is vital for function. Oftentimes, as a consequence of environmental stress, genetic mutation, and/or infection, the folded structure of a protein gets altered and multiple proteins stick and fall out of solution in a process known as aggregation. In many protein aggregation diseases, incorrectly folded proteins self-associate, for This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. The instructor for this course, Dr. Kosinski-Collins, is a member of the HHMI Education Group. Maintenance of the complex three-dimensional structure adopted by a protein in the cell is vital for function. Oftentimes, as a consequence of environmental stress, genetic mutation, and/or infection, the folded structure of a protein gets altered and multiple proteins stick and fall out of solution in a process known as aggregation. In many protein aggregation diseases, incorrectly folded proteins self-associate, for

Subjects

protein folding | protein folding | misfolded proteins | misfolded proteins | Mad Cow | Mad Cow | Creutzfedt-Jakob Disease | Creutzfedt-Jakob Disease | Alzheimer's Disease | Alzheimer's Disease | Huntington's Disease | Huntington's Disease | protein aggregation | protein aggregation | self-associate | self-associate | cell death | cell death | dementia | dementia | prions | prions | bovine spongiform encephalopathy | bovine spongiform encephalopathy | kuru | kuru | scrapie | scrapie | protein structure | protein structure | amyloid protein | amyloid protein | amyloidosis | amyloidosis | polyglutamine repeats | polyglutamine repeats | fibrils | fibrils

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.301 The Ancient World: Greece (MIT) 21H.301 The Ancient World: Greece (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander. It covers major social, economic, political, and religious trends. It also includes discussions on Homer, heroism, and the Greek identity; the hoplite revolution and the rise of the city-state; Herodotus, Persia, and the (re)birth of history; Empire, Thucydidean rationalism, and the Peloponnesian War; Platonic constructs; Aristotle, Macedonia, and Hellenism. Emphasis is on use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander. It covers major social, economic, political, and religious trends. It also includes discussions on Homer, heroism, and the Greek identity; the hoplite revolution and the rise of the city-state; Herodotus, Persia, and the (re)birth of history; Empire, Thucydidean rationalism, and the Peloponnesian War; Platonic constructs; Aristotle, Macedonia, and Hellenism. Emphasis is on use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Ancient | Ancient | Greece | Greece | Bronze Age | Bronze Age | death | death | Alexander | Alexander | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | Homer | Homer | heroism | heroism | Greek | Greek | identity | identity | hoplite revolution | hoplite revolution | city-state | city-state | Herodotus | Herodotus | Persia | Persia | Empire | Empire | Thucydidean rationalism | Thucydidean rationalism | Peloponnesian War | Peloponnesian War | Platonic constructs | Platonic constructs | Aristotle | Aristotle | Macedonia | Macedonia | Hellenism | Hellenism | primary sources | primary sources | translation. | translation.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.03 Good Food: The Ethics and Politics of Food Choices (MIT) 24.03 Good Food: The Ethics and Politics of Food Choices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the values (aesthetic, moral, cultural, religious, prudential, political) expressed in the choices of food people eat. It analyzes the decisions individuals make about what to eat, how society should manage food production and consumption collectively, and how reflection on food choices might help resolve conflicts between different values. This course explores the values (aesthetic, moral, cultural, religious, prudential, political) expressed in the choices of food people eat. It analyzes the decisions individuals make about what to eat, how society should manage food production and consumption collectively, and how reflection on food choices might help resolve conflicts between different values.

Subjects

food | food | hunger | hunger | human welfare | human welfare | obesity | obesity | weight | weight | omnivore | omnivore | ethics | ethics | agriculture | agriculture | poverty | poverty | ecology | ecology | locavorism | locavorism | vegan | vegan | vegetarian | vegetarian | speciesism | speciesism | activism | activism | junk food | junk food | gender | gender | animal death | animal death | nutrition | nutrition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT) 21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a

Subjects

criminal justice | criminal justice | citizenship | citizenship | nationhood | nationhood | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | religion | religion | mass incarceration | mass incarceration | poverty | poverty | class | class | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | death penalty | death penalty | drug laws | drug laws | police | police | terrorism | terrorism | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | 9/11 | 9/11 | Ferguson | Ferguson | Michael Brown | Michael Brown | Trayvon Martin | Trayvon Martin | Jim Crow | Jim Crow | felon disenfranchisement | felon disenfranchisement | plea bargaining | plea bargaining | George Zimmerman | George Zimmerman | militarization | militarization | guilt | guilt | innocence | innocence | illegal alien | illegal alien | undocumented | undocumented | immigration | immigration | deportation | deportation | civil liberties | civil liberties | internment | internment | Japanese | Japanese | WWII | WWII | police brutality | police brutality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi

Description

This free course, John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi, concentrates on Acts 1 and 2 of John Webster's Renaissance tragedy, The Duchess of Malfi. It focuses on the representation of marriage for love and the social conflicts to which it gives rise. The course is designed to hone your skills of textual analysis. First published on Wed, 06 Jan 2016 as John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi, concentrates on Acts 1 and 2 of John Webster's Renaissance tragedy, The Duchess of Malfi. It focuses on the representation of marriage for love and the social conflicts to which it gives rise. The course is designed to hone your skills of textual analysis. First published on Wed, 06 Jan 2016 as John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Literature | Literature | love | love | death | death | renaissance | renaissance | migration | migration | A230_1 | A230_1

License

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24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT) 24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern. This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern.

Subjects

pleasure | pleasure | desire | desire | satisfaction | satisfaction | objectivity | objectivity | environmentalism | environmentalism | animal rights | animal rights | immortality | immortality | egoism | egoism | skepticism | skepticism | relativism | relativism | toleration | toleration | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deontology | deontology | virtue | virtue | moral theory | moral theory | global justice | global justice | equality | equality | social justice | social justice | race | race | gender | gender | poverty | poverty | sex | sex | welfare | welfare | freedom | freedom | death penalty | death penalty | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexuality | sexuality | pornography | pornography | free speech | free speech | hate speech | hate speech

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.191 Ethics in Your Life: Being, Thinking, Doing (or Not?) (MIT) 24.191 Ethics in Your Life: Being, Thinking, Doing (or Not?) (MIT)

Description

This seminar is made possible through a collaboration between Radius and the Philosophy section of MIT. This course provides an opportunity to explore a wide range of ethical issues through guided discussions that are geared to equip students for ongoing reflection and action. Lectures and discussions with guest faculty, as well as attendance at on-and off-campus events, expose students to ethical problems and resources for addressing them. The course also encourages students to work collaboratively as they clarify their personal and vocational principles.Topics vary each term and reflect the interests of those enrolled. This seminar is made possible through a collaboration between Radius and the Philosophy section of MIT. This course provides an opportunity to explore a wide range of ethical issues through guided discussions that are geared to equip students for ongoing reflection and action. Lectures and discussions with guest faculty, as well as attendance at on-and off-campus events, expose students to ethical problems and resources for addressing them. The course also encourages students to work collaboratively as they clarify their personal and vocational principles.Topics vary each term and reflect the interests of those enrolled.

Subjects

ethics | ethics | global poor | global poor | homeless | homeless | disenfranchised | disenfranchised | death penalty | death penalty | prison | prison | Examined Life | Examined Life | famine | famine | affluence | affluence | morality | morality | racial profiling | racial profiling | justice system | justice system | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | deterrence | deterrence | military spending | military spending | federal spending | federal spending | farming | farming | gaming | gaming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.200 Ancient Philosophy (MIT) 24.200 Ancient Philosophy (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint the student with some of the ancient Greek contributions to the Western philosophical and scientific tradition. We will examine a broad range of central philosophical themes concerning: nature, law, justice, knowledge, virtue, happiness, and death. There will be a strong emphasis on analyses of arguments found in the texts. This course will acquaint the student with some of the ancient Greek contributions to the Western philosophical and scientific tradition. We will examine a broad range of central philosophical themes concerning: nature, law, justice, knowledge, virtue, happiness, and death. There will be a strong emphasis on analyses of arguments found in the texts.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | ancient | ancient | Greek western | Greek western | philosophical | philosophical | scientific | scientific | tradition | tradition | themes | themes | nature | nature | law | law | justice | justice | knowledge | knowledge | virtue | virtue | happiness | happiness | death | death | analysis | analysis | arguments | arguments | text | text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.16 Experimental Molecular Biology: Biotechnology II (MIT) 7.16 Experimental Molecular Biology: Biotechnology II (MIT)

Description

The course applies molecular biology and reverse genetics approaches to the study of apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), in Drosophila cells. RNA interference (RNAi), or double stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing, will be used to inhibit expression of candidate apoptosis-related genes in cultured Drosophila cells. Teams of 2 or 3 students will design and carry out experiments to address questions about the genes involved in the regulation and execution of PCD in this system. Some projects involve the use of DNA damaging agents or other cytotoxic chemicals or drugs to help understand the pathways that control a cell's decision to undergo apoptosis. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are provided. The course applies molecular biology and reverse genetics approaches to the study of apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), in Drosophila cells. RNA interference (RNAi), or double stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing, will be used to inhibit expression of candidate apoptosis-related genes in cultured Drosophila cells. Teams of 2 or 3 students will design and carry out experiments to address questions about the genes involved in the regulation and execution of PCD in this system. Some projects involve the use of DNA damaging agents or other cytotoxic chemicals or drugs to help understand the pathways that control a cell's decision to undergo apoptosis. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are provided.

Subjects

RNAi | RNAi | RNA interference | RNA interference | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | Drosophilia | Drosophilia | PCD | PCD | mRNA | mRNA | lab notebook | lab notebook | scientific writing | scientific writing | RT-PCR | RT-PCR | S2 RNA | S2 RNA | S2 | S2 | cell culture | cell culture | genetic transcription | genetic transcription | dsRNA | dsRNA | bioinformatics | bioinformatics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Dr. Grayson Speaking to Reporters, Announcing President Wilson's Death Dr. Grayson Speaking to Reporters, Announcing President Wilson's Death

Description

Subjects

death | death | president | president | announcement | announcement | wilson | wilson | reporters | reporters | 1924 | 1924 | carytgrayson | carytgrayson

License

No known copyright restrictions

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15.072J Queues: Theory and Applications (MIT) 15.072J Queues: Theory and Applications (MIT)

Description

This class deals with the modeling and analysis of queueing systems, with applications in communications, manufacturing, computers, call centers, service industries and transportation. Topics include birth-death processes and simple Markovian queues, networks of queues and product form networks, single and multi-server queues, multi-class queueing networks, fluid models, adversarial queueing networks, heavy-traffic theory and diffusion approximations. The course will cover state of the art results which lead to research opportunities. This class deals with the modeling and analysis of queueing systems, with applications in communications, manufacturing, computers, call centers, service industries and transportation. Topics include birth-death processes and simple Markovian queues, networks of queues and product form networks, single and multi-server queues, multi-class queueing networks, fluid models, adversarial queueing networks, heavy-traffic theory and diffusion approximations. The course will cover state of the art results which lead to research opportunities.

Subjects

modeling | modeling | queueing | queueing | queues | queues | queueing systems | queueing systems | communications | communications | manufacturing | manufacturing | computers | computers | call centers | call centers | service industries | service industries | transportation | transportation | applications | applications | birth-death processes | birth-death processes | markovian queues | markovian queues | networks | networks | single-server | single-server | multi-server | multi-server | multi-class queueing | multi-class queueing | fluid models | fluid models | adversarial queueing | adversarial queueing | heavy-traffic theory | heavy-traffic theory | diffusion approximations | diffusion approximations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.104J Chemicals in the Environment: Toxicology and Public Health (BE.104J) (MIT) 20.104J Chemicals in the Environment: Toxicology and Public Health (BE.104J) (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the challenges of defining a relationship between exposure to environmental chemicals and human disease. Course topics include epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation; biostatistical methods; evaluation of human exposure to chemicals, and their internal distribution, metabolism, reactions with cellular components, and biological effects; and qualitative and quantitative health risk assessment methods used in the U.S. as bases for regulatory decision-making. Throughout the term, students consider case studies of local and national interest. This course addresses the challenges of defining a relationship between exposure to environmental chemicals and human disease. Course topics include epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation; biostatistical methods; evaluation of human exposure to chemicals, and their internal distribution, metabolism, reactions with cellular components, and biological effects; and qualitative and quantitative health risk assessment methods used in the U.S. as bases for regulatory decision-making. Throughout the term, students consider case studies of local and national interest.

Subjects

biostatistics | biostatistics | risk | risk | risk analysis | risk analysis | risk factor | risk factor | environmental agent | environmental agent | environetics | environetics | cause and effect | cause and effect | pollution | pollution | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | toxic | toxic | genetics | genetics | disease | disease | health | health | EPA | EPA | metabolism | metabolism | endocrine | endocrine | immunity | immunity | uncertainty | uncertainty | mortality | mortality | death rate | death rate | prediction | prediction | 20.104 | 20.104 | 1.081 | 1.081 | ESD.053 | ESD.053 | BE.104J | BE.104J | BE.104 | BE.104

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT) 24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern. This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern.

Subjects

pleasure | pleasure | desire | desire | satisfaction | satisfaction | objectivity | objectivity | environmentalism | environmentalism | animal rights | animal rights | immortality | immortality | egoism | egoism | skepticism | skepticism | relativism | relativism | toleration | toleration | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deontology | deontology | virtue | virtue | moral theory | moral theory | global justice | global justice | equality | equality | social justice | social justice | race | race | gender | gender | poverty | poverty | sex | sex | welfare | welfare | freedom | freedom | famly | famly | vengeance | vengeance | retribution | retribution | reform | reform | punishment | punishment | prison | prison | body | body | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | death penalty | death penalty | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexuality | sexuality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Swiss Cottage, Cahir, Co. Tipperary Swiss Cottage, Cahir, Co. Tipperary

Description

Subjects

ireland | ireland | salmon | salmon | magnolia | magnolia | myrtle | myrtle | munster | munster | spiralstaircase | spiralstaircase | thatching | thatching | caretaker | caretaker | cahir | cahir | glassnegative | glassnegative | swisscottage | swisscottage | treetrunks | treetrunks | trove | trove | johnnash | johnnash | hobnob | hobnob | azalias | azalias | nationallibraryofaustralia | nationallibraryofaustralia | richardbutler | richardbutler | charteris | charteris | cotipperary | cotipperary | robertfrench | robertfrench | williamlawrence | williamlawrence | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | 1800’s | 1800’s | cedarshingles | cedarshingles | lawrencecollection | lawrencecollection | fishingtemple | fishingtemple | cottageorné | cottageorné | shootingaccident | shootingaccident | tragiccircumstances | tragiccircumstances | lawrencephotographicstudio | lawrencephotographicstudio | thelawrencephotographcollection | thelawrencephotographcollection | 1stearlofglengall | 1stearlofglengall | regencyarchitect | regencyarchitect | dufourwallpaper | dufourwallpaper | parisianwallpapers | parisianwallpapers | accidentaldeathklaxon | accidentaldeathklaxon | mrpeterdoherty | mrpeterdoherty | coroneramandeville | coroneramandeville | shothimselfthroughtheheart | shothimselfthroughtheheart | doublebarrelbreachloadinggun | doublebarrelbreachloadinggun | pheasantrygrounds | pheasantrygrounds | cahirpark | cahirpark | fantasticspoonbait | fantasticspoonbait | plumppheasants | plumppheasants | charterisestate | charterisestate | eugenehever | eugenehever | amasterthatcher | amasterthatcher | hugho’brien | hugho’brien | goldenreedthatch | goldenreedthatch | eugeneheavey | eugeneheavey | landcommission | landcommission

License

No known copyright restrictions

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BE.104J Chemicals in the Environment: Toxicology and Public Health (MIT) BE.104J Chemicals in the Environment: Toxicology and Public Health (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the challenges of defining a relationship between exposure to environmental chemicals and human disease. Course topics include epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation; biostatistical methods; evaluation of human exposure to chemicals, and their internal distribution, metabolism, reactions with cellular components, and biological effects; and qualitative and quantitative health risk assessment methods used in the U.S. as bases for regulatory decision-making. Throughout the term, students consider case studies of local and national interest. This course addresses the challenges of defining a relationship between exposure to environmental chemicals and human disease. Course topics include epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation; biostatistical methods; evaluation of human exposure to chemicals, and their internal distribution, metabolism, reactions with cellular components, and biological effects; and qualitative and quantitative health risk assessment methods used in the U.S. as bases for regulatory decision-making. Throughout the term, students consider case studies of local and national interest.

Subjects

biostatistics | biostatistics | risk | risk | risk analysis | risk analysis | risk factor | risk factor | environmental agent | environmental agent | environetics | environetics | cause and effect | cause and effect | pollution | pollution | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | toxic | toxic | genetics | genetics | disease | disease | health | health | EPA | EPA | metabolism | metabolism | endocrine | endocrine | immunity | immunity | uncertainty | uncertainty | mortality | mortality | death rate | death rate | prediction | prediction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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