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2.994 MADM with Applications in Material Selection and Optimal Design (MIT) 2.994 MADM with Applications in Material Selection and Optimal Design (MIT)

Description

This course begins with a comparative review of conventional and advanced multiple attribute decision making (MADM) models in engineering practice. Next, a new application of particular MADM models in reliable material selection of sensitive structural components as well as a multi-criteria Taguchi optimization method is discussed. Other specific topics include dealing with uncertainties in material properties, incommensurability in decision-makers opinions for the same design, objective ways of weighting performance indices, rank stability analysis, compensations and non-compensations. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course begins with a comparative review of conventional and advanced multiple attribute decision making (MADM) models in engineering practice. Next, a new application of particular MADM models in reliable material selection of sensitive structural components as well as a multi-criteria Taguchi optimization method is discussed. Other specific topics include dealing with uncertainties in material properties, incommensurability in decision-makers opinions for the same design, objective ways of weighting performance indices, rank stability analysis, compensations and non-compensations. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

materials selection | materials selection | tradeoff | tradeoff | optimization | optimization | Taguchi | Taguchi | multiple attribute | multiple attribute | decision making | decision making | multiple attribute decision making | multiple attribute decision making | performance index | performance index | rank stability analysis | rank stability analysis | decision matrix | decision matrix | multi-criteria decision making | multi-criteria decision making | multiobjective optimization | multiobjective optimization | Pareto | Pareto | TOPSIS | TOPSIS | ELECTRE | ELECTRE

License

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6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control (MIT) 6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). We will consider optimal control of a dynamical system over both a finite and an infinite number of stages (finite and infinite horizon). We will also discuss some approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces. Applications of dynamic programming in a variety of fields will be covered in recitations. This course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). We will consider optimal control of a dynamical system over both a finite and an infinite number of stages (finite and infinite horizon). We will also discuss some approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces. Applications of dynamic programming in a variety of fields will be covered in recitations.

Subjects

dynamic programming | dynamic programming | stochastic control | stochastic control | decision making | decision making | uncertainty | uncertainty | sequential decision making | sequential decision making | finite horizon | finite horizon | infinite horizon | infinite horizon | approximation methods | approximation methods | state space | state space | large state space | large state space | optimal control | optimal control | dynamical system | dynamical system | dynamic programming and optimal control | dynamic programming and optimal control | deterministic systems | deterministic systems | shortest path | shortest path | state information | state information | rollout | rollout | stochastic shortest path | stochastic shortest path | approximate dynamic programming | approximate dynamic programming

License

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2.994 MADM with Applications in Material Selection and Optimal Design (MIT)

Description

This course begins with a comparative review of conventional and advanced multiple attribute decision making (MADM) models in engineering practice. Next, a new application of particular MADM models in reliable material selection of sensitive structural components as well as a multi-criteria Taguchi optimization method is discussed. Other specific topics include dealing with uncertainties in material properties, incommensurability in decision-makers opinions for the same design, objective ways of weighting performance indices, rank stability analysis, compensations and non-compensations. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

materials selection | tradeoff | optimization | Taguchi | multiple attribute | decision making | multiple attribute decision making | performance index | rank stability analysis | decision matrix | multi-criteria decision making | multiobjective optimization | Pareto | TOPSIS | ELECTRE

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.269 Literature, Ethics and Authority (MIT) 15.269 Literature, Ethics and Authority (MIT)

Description

This course explores how we use story to articulate ethical norms. The syllabus consists of short fiction, novels, plays, feature films and some non-fiction. Major topics include leadership and authority, professionalism, the universality of ethical standards, and social enterprise, as well as questions of gender, cultural identity, the balance of family and work life, and the relation of science to ethics. Readings include work by Robert Bolt, Jane Smiley, Virginia Woolf, Ursula LeGuin, Wole Soyinka, and others; films include "Three Kings," "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," "Hotel Rwanda," and others. The course draws on various professions and national cultures, and is run as a series of moderated discussions, with students centrally engaged in the teaching process. This course explores how we use story to articulate ethical norms. The syllabus consists of short fiction, novels, plays, feature films and some non-fiction. Major topics include leadership and authority, professionalism, the universality of ethical standards, and social enterprise, as well as questions of gender, cultural identity, the balance of family and work life, and the relation of science to ethics. Readings include work by Robert Bolt, Jane Smiley, Virginia Woolf, Ursula LeGuin, Wole Soyinka, and others; films include "Three Kings," "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," "Hotel Rwanda," and others. The course draws on various professions and national cultures, and is run as a series of moderated discussions, with students centrally engaged in the teaching process.

Subjects

ethics | ethics | business | business | literature | literature | leadership | leadership | management | management | decision making | decision making | authority | authority

License

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | imaging | imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | impluse | impluse | brain imaging | brain imaging | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | mental focus | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT) 15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms. This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | interpersonal communication | business presentations | business presentations | communication strategies | communication strategies | teamwork | teamwork | running meetings | running meetings | managerial communication | managerial communication | business writing | business writing | business speaking | business speaking | group decision making | group decision making | hostile audience | hostile audience | role play exercises | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | persuading audiences | listening | listening | nonverbal communication | nonverbal communication | A | A | question and answer | question and answer | working with media | working with media | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.269A Literature, Ethics and Authority (MIT) 15.269A Literature, Ethics and Authority (MIT)

Description

This course is built around stories, because people everywhere use story to make sense of the world in which we live and act. Sense-making through story declares our ethical engagement with the world: recounting an event or action assigns it value, and asserts the authority of our unique interpretation through the story. This course is built around stories, because people everywhere use story to make sense of the world in which we live and act. Sense-making through story declares our ethical engagement with the world: recounting an event or action assigns it value, and asserts the authority of our unique interpretation through the story.

Subjects

ethics | ethics | business | business | literature | literature | leadership | leadership | management | management | decision making | decision making | authority | authority

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.094 Systems Optimization: Models and Computation (MIT) 15.094 Systems Optimization: Models and Computation (MIT)

Description

An applications-oriented course on the modeling of large-scale systems in decision-making domains and the optimization of such systems using state-of-the-art optimization tools. Application domains include: transportation and logistics planning, pattern classification and image processing, data mining, design of structures, scheduling in large systems, supply-chain management, financial engineering, and telecommunications systems planning. Modeling tools and techniques include linear, network, discrete and nonlinear optimization, heuristic methods, sensitivity and post-optimality analysis, decomposition methods for large-scale systems, and stochastic optimization. An applications-oriented course on the modeling of large-scale systems in decision-making domains and the optimization of such systems using state-of-the-art optimization tools. Application domains include: transportation and logistics planning, pattern classification and image processing, data mining, design of structures, scheduling in large systems, supply-chain management, financial engineering, and telecommunications systems planning. Modeling tools and techniques include linear, network, discrete and nonlinear optimization, heuristic methods, sensitivity and post-optimality analysis, decomposition methods for large-scale systems, and stochastic optimization.

Subjects

telecommunications system planning | telecommunications system planning | modeling of large-scale systems | modeling of large-scale systems | optimization software | optimization software | management | management | decision making | decision making | Mathematical optimization | Mathematical optimization

License

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STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT) STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. We will explore the changing political choices and ethical dilemmas of American scientists from the atomic scientists of World War II to biologists in the present wrestling with the questions raised by cloning and other biotechnologies. As well as asking how we would behave if confronted with the same choices, we will try to understand the choices scientists have made by seeing them in their historical and political contexts. Some of the topics covered include: the original development of nuclear weapons and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the effects of the Cold War on American science; the space shuttle disasters; debates on the use of nuclear power, wind power, and biofuels; abuse of human subjects in psychological and othe Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. We will explore the changing political choices and ethical dilemmas of American scientists from the atomic scientists of World War II to biologists in the present wrestling with the questions raised by cloning and other biotechnologies. As well as asking how we would behave if confronted with the same choices, we will try to understand the choices scientists have made by seeing them in their historical and political contexts. Some of the topics covered include: the original development of nuclear weapons and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the effects of the Cold War on American science; the space shuttle disasters; debates on the use of nuclear power, wind power, and biofuels; abuse of human subjects in psychological and othe

Subjects

risk | risk | science | science | society | society | ethics | ethics | politics | politics | technology | technology | history | history | controversy | controversy | atomic | atomic | whistleblowing | whistleblowing | GMO | GMO | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | nuclear | nuclear | space exploration | space exploration | energy | energy | policy | policy | debate | debate | museum | museum | archeology | archeology | war | war | terrorism | terrorism | tradeoff | tradeoff | decision making | decision making | medicine | medicine | health care policy | health care policy | biotechnology | biotechnology | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | human subjects | human subjects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ESD.932 Engineering Ethics (MIT) ESD.932 Engineering Ethics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV faculty introductions. This course introduces the theory and the practice of engineering ethics using a multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural approach. Theory includes ethics and philosophy of engineering. Historical cases are taken primarily from the scholarly literatures on engineering ethics, and hypothetical cases are written by students. Each student will write a story by selecting an ancestor or mythic hero as a substitute for a character in a historical case. Students will compare these cases and recommend action. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV faculty introductions. This course introduces the theory and the practice of engineering ethics using a multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural approach. Theory includes ethics and philosophy of engineering. Historical cases are taken primarily from the scholarly literatures on engineering ethics, and hypothetical cases are written by students. Each student will write a story by selecting an ancestor or mythic hero as a substitute for a character in a historical case. Students will compare these cases and recommend action.

Subjects

philosophy | philosophy | myth | myth | Kant | Kant | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | Kierkegaard | Kierkegaard | Augustine | Augustine | Joseph Campbell | Joseph Campbell | risk | risk | disaster | disaster | honesty | honesty | whisteblower | whisteblower | social responsibility | social responsibility | Pugwash | Pugwash | environment | environment | bioethics | bioethics | lawsuit | lawsuit | praxistics | praxistics | decision making | decision making | management | management | accident | accident | choice | choice | morals | morals | complexity | complexity | judgement | judgement | consequence | consequence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.969 Workshop on Deliberative Democracy and Dispute Resolution (MIT) 11.969 Workshop on Deliberative Democracy and Dispute Resolution (MIT)

Description

The Workshop on Deliberative Democracy and Dispute Resolution, sponsored by the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School and The Flora and William Hewlett Foundation, is a two-day conference that brings together dispute resolution professionals and political theorists in the field of deliberative democracy. The Workshop on Deliberative Democracy and Dispute Resolution, sponsored by the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School and The Flora and William Hewlett Foundation, is a two-day conference that brings together dispute resolution professionals and political theorists in the field of deliberative democracy.

Subjects

deliberative democracy | deliberative democracy | dispute resolution | dispute resolution | conflict management | conflict management | decision making | decision making | munipalities | munipalities | metropolitan areas | metropolitan areas | policy making | policy making | consensus building | consensus building | implementation of agreements | implementation of agreements | negotiated settlements | negotiated settlements | negotiated agreements | negotiated agreements

License

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11.950 Citizen Participation, Community Development, and Urban Governance in the Developing World (MIT) 11.950 Citizen Participation, Community Development, and Urban Governance in the Developing World (MIT)

Description

Citizen participation is everywhere. Invoking it has become de rigueur when discussing cities and regions in the developing world. From the World Bank to the World Social Forum, the virtues of participation are extolled: From its capacity to "deepen democracy" to its ability to improve governance, there is no shortage to the benefits it can bring. While it is clear that participation cannot possibly "do" all that is claimed, it is also clear that citizen participation cannot be dismissed, and that there must be something to it. Figuring out what that something is — whether it is identifying the types of participation or the contexts in which it happens that bring about desirable outcomes — is the goal of the class. Citizen participation is everywhere. Invoking it has become de rigueur when discussing cities and regions in the developing world. From the World Bank to the World Social Forum, the virtues of participation are extolled: From its capacity to "deepen democracy" to its ability to improve governance, there is no shortage to the benefits it can bring. While it is clear that participation cannot possibly "do" all that is claimed, it is also clear that citizen participation cannot be dismissed, and that there must be something to it. Figuring out what that something is — whether it is identifying the types of participation or the contexts in which it happens that bring about desirable outcomes — is the goal of the class.

Subjects

citizen participation | citizen participation | community development | community development | urban governance | urban governance | democracy | democracy | citizenship | citizenship | case studies | case studies | globalization | globalization | civil society | civil society | community | community | decision making | decision making | latin america | latin america | south asia | south asia | africa | africa

License

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11.959 Reforming Natural Resources Governance: Failings of Scientific Rationalism and Alternatives for Building Common Ground (MIT) 11.959 Reforming Natural Resources Governance: Failings of Scientific Rationalism and Alternatives for Building Common Ground (MIT)

Description

For the last century, precepts of scientific management and administrative rationality have concentrated power in the hands of technical specialists, which in recent decades has contributed to widespread disenfranchisement and discontent among stakeholders in natural resources cases. In this seminar we examine the limitations of scientific management as a model both for governance and for gathering and using information, and describe alternative methods for informing and organizing decision-making processes. We feature cases involving large carnivores in the West (mountain lions and grizzly bears), Northeast coastal fisheries, and adaptive management of the Colorado River. There will be nightly readings and a short written assignment. For the last century, precepts of scientific management and administrative rationality have concentrated power in the hands of technical specialists, which in recent decades has contributed to widespread disenfranchisement and discontent among stakeholders in natural resources cases. In this seminar we examine the limitations of scientific management as a model both for governance and for gathering and using information, and describe alternative methods for informing and organizing decision-making processes. We feature cases involving large carnivores in the West (mountain lions and grizzly bears), Northeast coastal fisheries, and adaptive management of the Colorado River. There will be nightly readings and a short written assignment.

Subjects

role-play simulation | role-play simulation | policymakers | policymakers | Cape Wind controversy | Cape Wind controversy | wind farms | wind farms | wind farm | wind farm | ecosystems | ecosystems | natural resources management | natural resources management | environmental policy-making | environmental policy-making | science organizations | science organizations | science | science | decision-making | decision-making | science agencies | science agencies | National Environmental Policy Act | National Environmental Policy Act | NEPA | NEPA | scientists | scientists | society | society | collaborative approaches | collaborative approaches | joint fact finding | joint fact finding | environment | environment | policy making | policy making | decision making | decision making | ethics in science | ethics in science | values | values | environmental policy | environmental policy | collaborative learning | collaborative learning | local and indigenous knowledge | local and indigenous knowledge | adaptive management | adaptive management | adaptive governance | adaptive governance | eco-system management | eco-system management | USGS | USGS | United States Geological Survey | United States Geological Survey

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.375 Role of Science and Scientists in Collaborative Approaches to Environmental Policymaking (MIT) 11.375 Role of Science and Scientists in Collaborative Approaches to Environmental Policymaking (MIT)

Description

This course examines joint fact-finding within the context of adaptive and ecosystem-based management. Challenges and obstacles to collaborative approaches for deciding environmental and natural resource policy and the institutional changes within federal agencies necessary to utilize joint fact-finding as a means to link science and societal decisions are discussed and reviewed with scientists and managers. Senior-level federal policymakers also participate in these discussions. This course examines joint fact-finding within the context of adaptive and ecosystem-based management. Challenges and obstacles to collaborative approaches for deciding environmental and natural resource policy and the institutional changes within federal agencies necessary to utilize joint fact-finding as a means to link science and societal decisions are discussed and reviewed with scientists and managers. Senior-level federal policymakers also participate in these discussions.

Subjects

science | science | scientists | scientists | society | society | collaborative approaches | collaborative approaches | joint fact finding | joint fact finding | environment | environment | policy making | policy making | decision making | decision making | ethics in science | ethics in science | values | values | environmental policy | environmental policy | collaborative learning | collaborative learning | local and indigenous knowledge | local and indigenous knowledge | adaptive management | adaptive management | adaptive governance | adaptive governance | eco-system management | eco-system management | USGS | USGS | United States Geological Survey | United States Geological Survey

License

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11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT) 11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public polic Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public polic

Subjects

policymaking | policymaking | problem-solving process | problem-solving process | political process | political process | administrative agencies | administrative agencies | legislators | legislators | the courts | the courts | the mass public | the mass public | interest groups | interest groups | media | media | policy development | policy development | empirical models | empirical models | legislative | legislative | judicial | judicial | executive | executive | stakeholders | stakeholders | public decision making | public decision making | 11.002 | 11.002 | 17.30 | 17.30

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.373 Science, Politics, and Environmental Policy (MIT) 11.373 Science, Politics, and Environmental Policy (MIT)

Description

This class examines the role of science in the US environmental policy-making process. It investigates the methods scientists use to learn about the natural world, the way scientific knowledge accumulates, the treatment of science by advocates and the media, and the role of science in legislative, administrative and judicial decision making. It also considers how other political systems use science in an effort to put the US approach in comparative perspective. This class examines the role of science in the US environmental policy-making process. It investigates the methods scientists use to learn about the natural world, the way scientific knowledge accumulates, the treatment of science by advocates and the media, and the role of science in legislative, administrative and judicial decision making. It also considers how other political systems use science in an effort to put the US approach in comparative perspective.

Subjects

environmental policy | environmental policy | sound science | sound science | legislative policy | legislative policy | media influence | media influence | public participation | public participation | policy process | policy process | regulatory science | regulatory science | public perception | public perception | judicial decision making | judicial decision making | advocacy science | advocacy science | adaptive management | adaptive management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.771 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (MIT) 14.771 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (MIT)

Description

Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings. Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings.

Subjects

productivity | productivity | health | health | education | education | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | public finance | public finance | decision making | decision making | families | families | firms | firms | contracts | contracts | technology | technology | labor | labor | migration | migration | land | land | credit | credit | savings | savings | poverty | poverty | inequality | inequality | nutrition | nutrition | school choice | school choice | school vouchers | school vouchers | subsidies | subsidies | taxes | taxes | employment | employment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT) 14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT)

Description

The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory. The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory.

Subjects

information | information | economics | economics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | money | money | risk sharing | risk sharing | moral hazard | moral hazard | adverse selection | adverse selection | signaling | signaling | screening | screening | mechanism design | mechanism design | decision making | decision making | uncertainty | uncertainty | Decision-making | Decision-making | information economics | information economics | incentive theory | incentive theory | contract theory | contract theory | choice | choice | choices | choices | microeconomic analysis | microeconomic analysis | risk | risk

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT) 15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in (15.279) Management Communication for Undergraduates or (15.280) Communication for Managers. It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms. This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in (15.279) Management Communication for Undergraduates or (15.280) Communication for Managers. It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | interpersonal communication | business presentations | business presentations | communication strategies | communication strategies | teamwork | teamwork | running meetings | running meetings | managerial communication | managerial communication | business writing | business writing | business speaking | business speaking | group decision making | group decision making | hostile audience | hostile audience | role play exercises | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | persuading audiences | listening | listening | nonverbal communication | nonverbal communication | A | A | question and answer | question and answer | working with media | working with media | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.094J Systems Optimization: Models and Computation (SMA 5223) (MIT) 15.094J Systems Optimization: Models and Computation (SMA 5223) (MIT)

Description

This class is an applications-oriented course covering the modeling of large-scale systems in decision-making domains and the optimization of such systems using state-of-the-art optimization tools. Application domains include: transportation and logistics planning, pattern classification and image processing, data mining, design of structures, scheduling in large systems, supply-chain management, financial engineering, and telecommunications systems planning. Modeling tools and techniques include linear, network, discrete and nonlinear optimization, heuristic methods, sensitivity and post-optimality analysis, decomposition methods for large-scale systems, and stochastic optimization. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5223 This class is an applications-oriented course covering the modeling of large-scale systems in decision-making domains and the optimization of such systems using state-of-the-art optimization tools. Application domains include: transportation and logistics planning, pattern classification and image processing, data mining, design of structures, scheduling in large systems, supply-chain management, financial engineering, and telecommunications systems planning. Modeling tools and techniques include linear, network, discrete and nonlinear optimization, heuristic methods, sensitivity and post-optimality analysis, decomposition methods for large-scale systems, and stochastic optimization. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5223

Subjects

decision making | decision making | management | management | Mathematical optimization | Mathematical optimization | modeling of large-scale system | modeling of large-scale system | optimization software | optimization software | telecommunications system planning | telecommunications system planning | 15.094 | 15.094 | 1.142 | 1.142 | SMA 5223 | SMA 5223

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.316 Building and Leading Effective Teams (MIT) 15.316 Building and Leading Effective Teams (MIT)

Description

This course is an intensive one-week introduction to leadership, teams, and learning communities. The class meets daily for five days. The class serves as an introduction of concepts and uses a variety of experiential exercises to develop individual and team skills, as well as supportive relationships within the Leaders for Manufacturing class. As part of the focus on leadership, it discusses the idea of the "Universe Within", the images, thoughts, and experiences that are internal to all leaders. This course is an intensive one-week introduction to leadership, teams, and learning communities. The class meets daily for five days. The class serves as an introduction of concepts and uses a variety of experiential exercises to develop individual and team skills, as well as supportive relationships within the Leaders for Manufacturing class. As part of the focus on leadership, it discusses the idea of the "Universe Within", the images, thoughts, and experiences that are internal to all leaders.

Subjects

leadership | leadership | teambuilding | teambuilding | ladder of inference | ladder of inference | learning communities | learning communities | experiences | experiences | management | management | teams | teams | skill set | skill set | facilitation | facilitation | motivation | motivation | decision making | decision making | planned change | planned change | Universe Within | Universe Within | Fifth Discipline | Fifth Discipline | Peter Senge | Peter Senge | Rick Ross | Rick Ross

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.301 Managerial Psychology Laboratory (MIT) 15.301 Managerial Psychology Laboratory (MIT)

Description

We function in our personal and professional lives based on knowledge and intuitions. Our intuition that we know a lot is very powerful. But sometimes intuitions are accurate and sometimes they are not; without research, it is hard to tell. This course combines a few different goals: develop a critical eye for making inferences from data; be able to carry out simple data analysis; learn about managerial psychology; develop interesting new questions about managerial psychology and test these questions. We function in our personal and professional lives based on knowledge and intuitions. Our intuition that we know a lot is very powerful. But sometimes intuitions are accurate and sometimes they are not; without research, it is hard to tell. This course combines a few different goals: develop a critical eye for making inferences from data; be able to carry out simple data analysis; learn about managerial psychology; develop interesting new questions about managerial psychology and test these questions.

Subjects

psychology | psychology | group dynamics | group dynamics | motivation | motivation | reward system | reward system | incentive | incentive | norms | norms | creativity | creativity | decision making | decision making | leadership | leadership | career development | career development | organization | organization | mentor | mentor | communication | communication | management | management | business | business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT) 15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments. The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | applied economics | resource scarcity | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | allocate limited resources | business choices | business choices | modeling consumer choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | market efficiency | microeconomics | microeconomics | efficiency | efficiency | supply | supply | demand | demand | consumer theory | consumer theory | producer theory | producer theory | monopoly | monopoly | imperfect competition | imperfect competition | pricing | pricing | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | group decision making | group decision making | organizational architecture | organizational architecture | international trade | international trade | equity | equity | income distribution | income distribution | economic rewards | economic rewards | managerial economics | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | corporate finance theory | network economy | network economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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