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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | general equilibrium | externalities | Afriat's theorem | pricing | robust comparative statics | utility theory | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | revealed preference | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | increasing differences | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | government intervention | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | common property externalities | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | core | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | incentives | housing markets core mechanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.433J Real Estate Economics (MIT) 11.433J Real Estate Economics (MIT)

Description

This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate. This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate.

Subjects

real estate; property; macroeconomic factors; supply and demand; market cycles; land markets; demographic trends; transportation; government regulation; real estate market; demographic analysis; regional growth; residential construction; new home building; commercial construction; retail stores; urban location theory; predicting demand; modeling techniques; urban economics; land use; urban growth; residential development; gentrification; zoning; property taxes; neighboorhood effects | real estate; property; macroeconomic factors; supply and demand; market cycles; land markets; demographic trends; transportation; government regulation; real estate market; demographic analysis; regional growth; residential construction; new home building; commercial construction; retail stores; urban location theory; predicting demand; modeling techniques; urban economics; land use; urban growth; residential development; gentrification; zoning; property taxes; neighboorhood effects | real estate | real estate | property | property | macroeconomic factors | macroeconomic factors | supply and demand | supply and demand | market cycles | market cycles | land markets | land markets | demographic trends | demographic trends | transportation | transportation | government regulation | government regulation | real estate market | real estate market | demographic analysis | demographic analysis | regional growth | regional growth | residential construction | residential construction | new home building | new home building | commercial construction | commercial construction | retail stores | retail stores | urban location theory | urban location theory | predicting demand | predicting demand | modeling techniques | modeling techniques | urban economics | urban economics | land use | land use | urban growth | urban growth | residential development | residential development | gentrification | gentrification | zoning | zoning | property taxes | property taxes | neighboorhood effects | neighboorhood effects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | optimization | allocation | economic measurement | analysis | microeconomics | demand | supply | equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer preference | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | interior solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | individual demand | market demand | revealed preferences | substitution effect | income effect | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | network externalities | uncertainty | preference toward risk | risk premium | indifference curves | diversification | insurance | producer theory | production functions | short run | long run | returns to scale | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scope | learning | profit maximization | producer surplus | agricultural price support | tax | subsidy | exchange economy | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | monopoly | multiplant firm | social cost | price regulation | monopsony | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | bundling | monopolistic competition | game theory | oligopoly | Cournot | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.75J Airline Management (MIT) 16.75J Airline Management (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of airline management decision processes with a focus on economic issues and their relationship to operations planning models and decision support tools. It emphasizes the application of economic models of demand, pricing, costs, and supply to airline markets and networks, and it examines industry practice and emerging methods for fleet planning, route network design, scheduling, pricing and revenue management. This course provides an overview of airline management decision processes with a focus on economic issues and their relationship to operations planning models and decision support tools. It emphasizes the application of economic models of demand, pricing, costs, and supply to airline markets and networks, and it examines industry practice and emerging methods for fleet planning, route network design, scheduling, pricing and revenue management.

Subjects

airline economics | airline economics | demand models | demand models | market share | market share | differential pricing | differential pricing | revenues | revenues | airline operating costs | airline operating costs | labor productivity | labor productivity | aircraft productivity | aircraft productivity | demand stochasticity | demand stochasticity | flight leg spill models | flight leg spill models | unconstrained demand | unconstrained demand | load and spill analysis | load and spill analysis | airline schedule development | airline schedule development | passenger choice | passenger choice | decision window | decision window | airline management | airline management | fleet assignment optimization | fleet assignment optimization | route planning | route planning | network strategies | network strategies | operational constraints | operational constraints | scheduling constraints | scheduling constraints | revenue management | revenue management | overbooking | overbooking | seat inventory control | seat inventory control | 16.75 | 16.75 | 1.234 | 1.234

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.818 Pricing (MIT) 15.818 Pricing (MIT)

Description

This course, primarily discussion based, provides a framework for understanding pricing strategies and tactics. Topics covered include pricing in competitive markets, estimating demand, price discrimination, the role of price cues, anticipating competitive responses, pricing in business to business markets, and pricing of new products. Lectures and cases are the primary modes of learning. This course, primarily discussion based, provides a framework for understanding pricing strategies and tactics. Topics covered include pricing in competitive markets, estimating demand, price discrimination, the role of price cues, anticipating competitive responses, pricing in business to business markets, and pricing of new products. Lectures and cases are the primary modes of learning.

Subjects

pricing | pricing | pricing strategy | pricing strategy | marketing | marketing | value-based pricing | value-based pricing | maximizing economic value | maximizing economic value | evc | evc | behavioral pricing | behavioral pricing | measuring demand | measuring demand | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | demand | demand | competition | competition | price cut | price cut | price war | price war | segmentation | segmentation | product line pricing | product line pricing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.44 Energy Economics (MIT) 14.44 Energy Economics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission. This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission.

Subjects

supply and demand | supply and demand | competitive market | competitive market | energy demand | energy demand | income elasticity | income elasticity | multivariate regression analysis | multivariate regression analysis | natural gas | natural gas | price regulation | price regulation | deregulation | deregulation | electricity | electricity | oil | oil | energy security | energy security | risk management | risk management | futures markets | futures markets | climate change | climate change | energy | energy | coal | coal | nuclear power | nuclear power | energy efficiency | energy efficiency | policy | policy | renewable energy | renewable energy | emissions | emissions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.433J Real Estate Economics (MIT)

Description

This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate.

Subjects

real estate; property; macroeconomic factors; supply and demand; market cycles; land markets; demographic trends; transportation; government regulation; real estate market; demographic analysis; regional growth; residential construction; new home building; commercial construction; retail stores; urban location theory; predicting demand; modeling techniques; urban economics; land use; urban growth; residential development; gentrification; zoning; property taxes; neighboorhood effects | real estate | property | macroeconomic factors | supply and demand | market cycles | land markets | demographic trends | transportation | government regulation | real estate market | demographic analysis | regional growth | residential construction | new home building | commercial construction | retail stores | urban location theory | predicting demand | modeling techniques | urban economics | land use | urban growth | residential development | gentrification | zoning | property taxes | neighboorhood effects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.201J Transportation Systems Analysis: Demand and Economics (MIT) 1.201J Transportation Systems Analysis: Demand and Economics (MIT)

Description

The main objective of this course is to give broad insight into the different facets of transportation systems, while providing a solid introduction to transportation demand and cost analyses. As part of the core in the Master of Science in Transportation program, the course will not focus on a specific transportation mode but will use the various modes to apply the theoretical and analytical concepts presented in the lectures and readings. Introduces transportation systems analysis, stressing demand and economic aspects. Covers the key principles governing transportation planning, investment, operations and maintenance. Introduces the microeconomic concepts central to transportation systems. Topics covered include economic theories of the firm, the consumer, and the market, demand models, The main objective of this course is to give broad insight into the different facets of transportation systems, while providing a solid introduction to transportation demand and cost analyses. As part of the core in the Master of Science in Transportation program, the course will not focus on a specific transportation mode but will use the various modes to apply the theoretical and analytical concepts presented in the lectures and readings. Introduces transportation systems analysis, stressing demand and economic aspects. Covers the key principles governing transportation planning, investment, operations and maintenance. Introduces the microeconomic concepts central to transportation systems. Topics covered include economic theories of the firm, the consumer, and the market, demand models,

Subjects

1.201 | 1.201 | 11.545 | 11.545 | ESD.210 | ESD.210 | transportation | transportation | travel demand | travel demand | organizational models | organizational models | consumer theory | consumer theory | project finance | project finance | intelligent transportation systems | intelligent transportation systems | project evaluation | project evaluation | demand modelling | demand modelling | technology | technology | environmental | environmental | energy | energy | economic development | economic development | sustainability | sustainability | urban structure | urban structure | land use | land use | equity | equity | transportation components | transportation components | intermodal combinations | intermodal combinations | quantitative modeling | quantitative modeling | strategic regional planning | strategic regional planning | institutional change analysis | institutional change analysis | large-scale systems | large-scale systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe. This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | Planning | Planning | water supply | water supply | sanitation | sanitation | developing countries | developing countries | sanitation technologies | sanitation technologies | service pricing | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | alternative institutional structures | privatization | privatization | consumer demand | consumer demand | community participation | community participation | planning processes | planning processes | environmental health | environmental health | public health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | low-income households | case studies | case studies | policy memos | policy memos | journals | journals | environment | environment | sustainability | sustainability | pollution | pollution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT) 14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT)

Description

This is a graduate course in labor economics. The course will focus on covering theory and evidence on inequality, wage structure, skill demands, employment, job loss, and early-life determinants of long-run outcomes. Particular areas of focus are: (1) wage determination, including the Roy model, equalizing wage differentials, and models of discrimination; (2) the roles played by supply, demand, institutions, technology and trade in the evolving distribution of income. This is a graduate course in labor economics. The course will focus on covering theory and evidence on inequality, wage structure, skill demands, employment, job loss, and early-life determinants of long-run outcomes. Particular areas of focus are: (1) wage determination, including the Roy model, equalizing wage differentials, and models of discrimination; (2) the roles played by supply, demand, institutions, technology and trade in the evolving distribution of income.

Subjects

labor economics | labor economics | inequality | inequality | wage structure | wage structure | skill demands | skill demands | employment | employment | job loss | job loss | early-life determinants | early-life determinants | long-run outcomes | long-run outcomes | Roy model | Roy model | wage differentials | wage differentials | supply | supply | demand | demand | income | income

License

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15.021J Real Estate Economics (MIT) 15.021J Real Estate Economics (MIT)

Description

This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate. This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate.

Subjects

real estate | real estate | property | property | macroeconomic factors | macroeconomic factors | supply and demand | supply and demand | market cycles | market cycles | land markets | land markets | demographic trends | demographic trends | transportation | transportation | government regulation | government regulation | real estate market | real estate market | demographic analysis | demographic analysis | regional growth | regional growth | residential construction | residential construction | new home building | new home building | commercial construction | commercial construction | retail stores | retail stores | urban location theory | urban location theory | predicting demand | predicting demand | modeling techniques | modeling techniques | urban economics | urban economics | land use | land use | urban growth | urban growth | residential development | residential development | gentrification | gentrification | zoning | zoning | property taxes | property taxes | neighboorhood effects | neighboorhood effects | neighborhood effects | neighborhood effects | 15.021 | 15.021 | 11.433 | 11.433

License

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16.75J Airline Management (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of airline management decision processes with a focus on economic issues and their relationship to operations planning models and decision support tools. It emphasizes the application of economic models of demand, pricing, costs, and supply to airline markets and networks, and it examines industry practice and emerging methods for fleet planning, route network design, scheduling, pricing and revenue management.

Subjects

airline economics | demand models | market share | differential pricing | revenues | airline operating costs | labor productivity | aircraft productivity | demand stochasticity | flight leg spill models | unconstrained demand | load and spill analysis | airline schedule development | passenger choice | decision window | airline management | fleet assignment optimization | route planning | network strategies | operational constraints | scheduling constraints | revenue management | overbooking | seat inventory control | 16.75 | 1.234

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.75J Airline Management (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of airline management decision processes with a focus on economic issues and their relationship to operations planning models and decision support tools. It emphasizes the application of economic models of demand, pricing, costs, and supply to airline markets and networks, and it examines industry practice and emerging methods for fleet planning, route network design, scheduling, pricing and revenue management.

Subjects

airline economics | demand models | market share | differential pricing | revenues | airline operating costs | labor productivity | aircraft productivity | demand stochasticity | flight leg spill models | unconstrained demand | load and spill analysis | airline schedule development | passenger choice | decision window | airline management | fleet assignment optimization | route planning | network strategies | operational constraints | scheduling constraints | revenue management | overbooking | seat inventory control | 16.75 | 1.234

License

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

Microeconomics | prices | normative economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | supply | demand | equilibrium | demand shift | supply shift | government interference | elasticity | revenue | empirical economics | consumer theory | preference assumptions | indifference curves | utility functions | marginal utility | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | Engel curves | income effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | labor economics | child labor | producer theory | variable inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | productivity | perfect competition | search theory | residual demand | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | agency problem | welfare economics | consumer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | monopoly | oligopoly | market power | price discrimination | price regulation | antitrust policy | mergers | cartel | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | international trade | uncertainty | capital markets | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | compounding | inflation | investment | discount rate | net present value | income distribution | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social security | moral hazard | taxation | EITC | healthcare | PPACA

License

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests. Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests.

Subjects

labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

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14.44 Energy Economics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission.

Subjects

supply and demand | competitive market | energy demand | income elasticity | multivariate regression analysis | natural gas | price regulation | deregulation | electricity | oil | energy security | risk management | futures markets | climate change | energy | coal | nuclear power | energy efficiency | policy | renewable energy | emissions

License

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14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT) 14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment.

Subjects

labor Economics | labor Economics | public policy | public policy | applied microeconomics | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | taxes and transfers | human capital | human capital | minimum wages | minimum wages | income distribution | income distribution | unions and strikes | unions and strikes | immigration | immigration | incentives | incentives | discrimination | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance | unemployment and unemployment insurance | bargaining | bargaining | economics of the family | economics of the family | decision to work | decision to work | home production | home production | monpsony | monpsony | education | education | training | training

License

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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | Planning | water supply | sanitation | developing countries | sanitation technologies | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | privatization | consumer demand | community participation | planning processes | environmental health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | case studies | policy memos | journals | environment | sustainability | pollution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.021J Real Estate Economics (MIT)

Description

This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate.

Subjects

real estate | property | macroeconomic factors | supply and demand | market cycles | land markets | demographic trends | transportation | government regulation | real estate market | demographic analysis | regional growth | residential construction | new home building | commercial construction | retail stores | urban location theory | predicting demand | modeling techniques | urban economics | land use | urban growth | residential development | gentrification | zoning | property taxes | neighboorhood effects | neighborhood effects | 15.021 | 11.433

License

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11.203 Microeconomics (MIT) 11.203 Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Microeconomics will ground you in - surprise - basic microeconomics-how markets function, how to think about allocating scarce resources among competing uses, what profit maximizing behavior means in industries with different numbers of competitors, how technology and trade reshapes the opportunities people face, and so on. We will apply economic ideas to understand current economic problems, including the housing bubble, the current unemployment situation (particularly for high school gradutes), how Google makes its money and why healthcare costs are rising so fast. Microeconomics will ground you in - surprise - basic microeconomics-how markets function, how to think about allocating scarce resources among competing uses, what profit maximizing behavior means in industries with different numbers of competitors, how technology and trade reshapes the opportunities people face, and so on. We will apply economic ideas to understand current economic problems, including the housing bubble, the current unemployment situation (particularly for high school gradutes), how Google makes its money and why healthcare costs are rising so fast.

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | markets | markets | economy | economy | competition | competition | economic development | economic development | supply and demand | supply and demand | oligopoly | oligopoly

License

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. This course is taught in two parts: Fall term and then in the subsequent Fall term. The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. This course is taught in two parts: Fall term and then in the subsequent Fall term.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ESD.260J Logistics Systems (MIT) ESD.260J Logistics Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of analytic tools, approaches, and techniques which are useful in the design and operation of logistics systems and integrated supply chains. The material is taught from a managerial perspective, with an emphasis on where and how specific tools can be used to improve the overall performance and reduce the total cost of a supply chain. There is a strong emphasis on the development and use of fundamental models to illustrate the underlying concepts involved in both intra- and inter-company logistics operations. The following topics are covered: demand forecasting tools, inventory control algorithms, transportation operations and management, vehicle routing, scheduling, fleet dispatching algorithms and approaches, optimization of transportation carrier operations, supp This course is a survey of analytic tools, approaches, and techniques which are useful in the design and operation of logistics systems and integrated supply chains. The material is taught from a managerial perspective, with an emphasis on where and how specific tools can be used to improve the overall performance and reduce the total cost of a supply chain. There is a strong emphasis on the development and use of fundamental models to illustrate the underlying concepts involved in both intra- and inter-company logistics operations. The following topics are covered: demand forecasting tools, inventory control algorithms, transportation operations and management, vehicle routing, scheduling, fleet dispatching algorithms and approaches, optimization of transportation carrier operations, supp

Subjects

Logistics systems | Logistics systems | Supply chain management | Supply chain management | Demand planning | Demand planning | Procurement | Procurement | Inventory | Inventory | Transportation planning | Transportation planning | Reverse logistics | Reverse logistics | Flexible contracting | Flexible contracting | Postponement | Postponement | Portfolio management | Portfolio management | Dual sourcing | Dual sourcing | demand forecasting tools | demand forecasting tools | inventory control algorithms | inventory control algorithms | transportation operations | transportation operations | vehicle routing | vehicle routing | scheduling | scheduling | fleet dispatching algorithms | fleet dispatching algorithms | optimization | optimization | transportation carrier operations | transportation carrier operations | supply chain network design | supply chain network design | procurement | procurement | sourcing | sourcing | auctions | auctions | supply contracts | supply contracts | collaboration | collaboration | supply chain uncertainty | supply chain uncertainty | ESD.260 | ESD.260 | 1.260 | 1.260 | 15.770 | 15.770

License

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