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17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

political economy | political economy | rational choice | rational choice | legislature | legislature | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | court | court | and elections | and elections | electoral competition | electoral competition | comparative | comparative | international | international | public goods | public goods | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | multiparty competition | multiparty competition | electoral system | electoral system | voter | voter | agency models | agency models | models of political parties | models of political parties | point-valued solution | point-valued solution | set-valued solution | set-valued solution | probabilistic voting models | probabilistic voting models | structure-induced equilibrium models | structure-induced equilibrium models | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | minorities | minorities | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | government stability | government stability | informational theory | informational theory | distributive theory | distributive theory | legislative-executive relations | legislative-executive relations | representative democracy | representative democracy | direct democracy | direct democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.196 Globalization (MIT) 17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined. This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | international economy | domestic politics | domestic politics | economy | economy | and society | and society | globalization | globalization | wages | wages | inequality; social safety nets | inequality; social safety nets | production | production | innovation | innovation | developed countries | developed countries | developing countries | developing countries | democracy. | democracy. | democracy | democracy | inequality | inequality | social safety nets | social safety nets | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.196 Globalization (MIT) 17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined. This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | international economy | domestic politics | domestic politics | economy | economy | and society | and society | globalization | globalization | wages | wages | inequality; social safety nets | inequality; social safety nets | production | production | innovation | innovation | developed countries | developed countries | developing countries | developing countries | democracy. | democracy. | democracy | democracy | inequality | inequality | social safety nets | social safety nets | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.501 The American Novel (MIT) 21L.501 The American Novel (MIT)

Description

The theme for this class is "American Revolution." We will read authors who record, on the one hand, the failures of the American revolution, with its dream of democracy and freedom for all, and on the other hand the potential for narrative to reenact that revolution successfully. In different ways, these authors overturn traditional or unethical authority through their literary innovations. Although certain classic American historical, political, and cultural issues will be at the center of our study--democracy, slavery, gender equity, social reform--we will concern ourselves primarily with literary strategies, with language and its uses. Essays will pursue close readings of the texts and develop students' abilities to think creatively and critically about fictional works. The theme for this class is "American Revolution." We will read authors who record, on the one hand, the failures of the American revolution, with its dream of democracy and freedom for all, and on the other hand the potential for narrative to reenact that revolution successfully. In different ways, these authors overturn traditional or unethical authority through their literary innovations. Although certain classic American historical, political, and cultural issues will be at the center of our study--democracy, slavery, gender equity, social reform--we will concern ourselves primarily with literary strategies, with language and its uses. Essays will pursue close readings of the texts and develop students' abilities to think creatively and critically about fictional works.

Subjects

American novel | American novel | democracy | slavery | democracy | slavery | democracy | democracy | slavery | slavery | gender equity | gender equity | social reform | social reform | literary strategies | literary strategies | William Blake | William Blake | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Sarah Orne Jewett | Sarah Orne Jewett | William Faulkner | William Faulkner | Toni Morrison | Toni Morrison

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Politics, power and political economy in Latin America Politics, power and political economy in Latin America

Description

Dr Motta's research focus is the politics of subaltern resistance, with particular reference to Latin America. Dr Motta's research focus is the politics of subaltern resistance, with particular reference to Latin America. This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module explores and analyses democratic politics in Latin America since the third wave of democratization in the 1980s. It is divided into three parts: 1. Conceptualising democracy in the region with a focus on the debate between those who argue that liberal democracy and liberal markets are necessary and desirable and those who argue that only experiments that go beyond both will truly democratise the region. 2. Explaining problems in democratic development such as lack of participation, representation and citizenship with reference to the political economy of neoliberalism, dependent development and political culture, amongst other theories. 3. Asking the qu This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module explores and analyses democratic politics in Latin America since the third wave of democratization in the 1980s. It is divided into three parts: 1. Conceptualising democracy in the region with a focus on the debate between those who argue that liberal democracy and liberal markets are necessary and desirable and those who argue that only experiments that go beyond both will truly democratise the region. 2. Explaining problems in democratic development such as lack of participation, representation and citizenship with reference to the political economy of neoliberalism, dependent development and political culture, amongst other theories. 3. Asking the qu

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Module Code: M13098 | Module Code: M13098 | politics and international relations | politics and international relations | conceptualising democracy | conceptualising democracy | liberal democracy | liberal democracy | liberal markets | liberal markets | democratic development | democratic development | citizenship | citizenship | political economy | political economy | neoliberalism | neoliberalism

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Truth, Evolution and Experiment: A Reconciliation Between Pragmatic Liberalism and Epistemic Democracy

Description

Felix Gerlsbeck, DPhil student at Columbia, delivers a talk for the Inaugural Oxford Graduate Conference in Political Theory. The conference theme was Political Theory and the Liberal Tradition. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

pragmatic liberalism | felix gerlsbeck | epistemic democracy | pragmatic liberalism | felix gerlsbeck | epistemic democracy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The challenges of reporting China to the outside world

Description

Jane Macartney, the Times and former Reuters Beijing bureau chief gives a talk for the RISJ seminar series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

The Times | democracy | reporting | journalism | reuters | china | internet | politics | The Times | democracy | reporting | journalism | reuters | china | internet | politics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Challenges for Media Democratization in Brazil and Latin America

Description

Dr Carolina Matos, former LSE fellow, gives a talk for the Reuters Institute seminar series on 6th June 2012. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

brazil | democracy | media | journalism | reuters | politics | Latin America | brazil | democracy | media | journalism | reuters | politics | Latin America

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Opinion Formation and Democratic Legitimacy

Description

Nadia Urbinati (Columbia University) delivers this lecture on government, opinion formation, the media and direct democracy as part of the Anglo-German 'State of the State' Fellowship Programme, given by Creative media and direct democracy. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

opinions | italy | government | direct democracy | media | state | politics | opinions | italy | government | direct democracy | media | state | politics | 2011-06-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations. This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | security | security | anarchy | anarchy | power | power | identity | identity | domestic policy | domestic policy | war | war | conflict | conflict | military | military | peace | peace | cooperation | cooperation | compliance | compliance | democracy | democracy | politics | politics | unipolarity | unipolarity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | economics | economics | political economy | political economy | democratic | democratic | countries | countries | collective | collective | choice | choice | electoral competiton | electoral competiton | public goods | public goods | size | size | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | voting models | voting models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | information | information | learning | learning | agency models | agency models | political parties | political parties | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | resource allocation | resource allocation | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | legislatures | legislatures | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | stability | stability | informational | informational | distributive | distributive | theories | theories | executive | executive | relations | relations | representative democracy | representative democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT) 21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT)

Description

This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the wars of independence at the start of the nineteenth century to the present. Issues studied will include independence and its aftermath, Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the US, dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, and revolutions in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America. This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the wars of independence at the start of the nineteenth century to the present. Issues studied will include independence and its aftermath, Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the US, dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, and revolutions in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America.

Subjects

Latin America | Latin America | wars of independence | wars of independence | global economy | global economy | dictatorship | dictatorship | democracy | democracy | Mexico | Mexico | Cuba | Cuba | Central America | Central America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.196 Globalization (MIT) 17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined. This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | international economy | domestic politics | domestic politics | economy | economy | and society | and society | globalization | globalization | wages | wages | nequality | nequality | inequality | inequality | social safety nets | social safety nets | production | production | innovation | innovation | developed countries | developed countries | developing countries | developing countries | democracy | democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Arab Democracy Uprisings and the Prospects for Peace in the Middle East. OxPeace 2011

Description

Did the Western Media (And Everyone Else) get it Wrong? Reflections from an American Journalist. Andrew Lee Butters, Reuters Institute Fellow, Oxford, gives the third talk in session two of the 2011 OxPeace Conference. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

democracy | egypt | media | peace | journalism | Tunisia | middle east | politics | western media | democracy | egypt | media | peace | journalism | Tunisia | middle east | politics | western media | 2011-05-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.561 European Politics (MIT) 17.561 European Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the organization of political power and the dynamics of political change in Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. In particular, it focuses on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations. This course examines the organization of political power and the dynamics of political change in Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. In particular, it focuses on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations.

Subjects

European politics | European politics | political power | political power | Britain | Britain | France | France | Germany | Germany | Italy | Italy | political parties | political parties | social class | social class | citizenship | citizenship | prime ministers | prime ministers | economy | economy | dictatorship | dictatorship | democracy | democracy | capitalism | capitalism | labour | labour | liberalization | liberalization | history | history | corruption | corruption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations. This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | security | security | anarchy | anarchy | power | power | identity | identity | domestic policy | domestic policy | war | war | conflict | conflict | military | military | peace | peace | cooperation | cooperation | compliance | compliance | democracy | democracy | politics | politics | unipolarity | unipolarity | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | rationalism | rationalism | international | international

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.265 Public Opinion and American Democracy (MIT) 17.265 Public Opinion and American Democracy (MIT)

Description

This course will examine public opinion and assess its place in the American political system. The course will emphasize both how citizens' thinking about politics is shaped and the role of public opinion in political campaigns, elections, and government. This course will examine public opinion and assess its place in the American political system. The course will emphasize both how citizens' thinking about politics is shaped and the role of public opinion in political campaigns, elections, and government.

Subjects

public opinion | public opinion | politics | politics | public policy-making | public policy-making | political psychology | political psychology | political behavior | political behavior | american democracy | american democracy | war | war | economic and social policies | economic and social policies | campaigns | campaigns | elections | elections | government | government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.55J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT) 17.55J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

Interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin America, drawing on films, literature, popular press accounts, and scholarly research. Topics include economic development, ethnic and racial identity, religion, revolution, democracy, transitional justice, and the rule of law. Examples draw on a range of countries in the region, especially Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. Includes a heavy oral participation component, with regular breakout groups, formal class presentations on pressing social issues (such as criminal justice and land tenure), and a structured class debate. Interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin America, drawing on films, literature, popular press accounts, and scholarly research. Topics include economic development, ethnic and racial identity, religion, revolution, democracy, transitional justice, and the rule of law. Examples draw on a range of countries in the region, especially Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. Includes a heavy oral participation component, with regular breakout groups, formal class presentations on pressing social issues (such as criminal justice and land tenure), and a structured class debate.

Subjects

17.55 | 17.55 | 21A.430 | 21A.430 | 21G.084 | 21G.084 | Mexico | Mexico | Venezuela | Venezuela | Brazil | Brazil | Chile | Chile | Latin America | Latin America | Spanish | Spanish | conquest | conquest | authoritarianism | authoritarianism | democracy | democracy | dictators | dictators | argentina | argentina | united states foreign policy | united states foreign policy | urbanization | urbanization | poverty | poverty | Big Mama's Funeral | Big Mama's Funeral | development | development | Pinochet | Pinochet | Allende | Allende | civilian-military relations | civilian-military relations | police reform | police reform | corruption | corruption | The House of Spirits | The House of Spirits | The Battle of Chile | The Battle of Chile | chinchillas | chinchillas

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT) 17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT)

Description

This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor. This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.

Subjects

social science | social science | institutions | institutions | ideology | ideology | policymaking | policymaking | state-building | state-building | democracy | democracy | regime change | regime change | conflict | conflict | war | war | political process | political process | nationalism | nationalism | terrorism | terrorism | social movment | social movment | modernization | modernization | secularization | secularization | church-state | church-state

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.905 Forms of Political Participation: Old and New (MIT) 17.905 Forms of Political Participation: Old and New (MIT)

Description

How and why do we participate in public life? How do we get drawn into community and political affairs? In this course we examine the associations and networks that connect us to one another and structure our social and political interactions. Readings are drawn from a growing body of research suggesting that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities represented by the concepts of civil society and social capital can have important effects on the functioning of democracy, stability and change in political regimes, the capacity of states to carry out their objectives, and international politics. How and why do we participate in public life? How do we get drawn into community and political affairs? In this course we examine the associations and networks that connect us to one another and structure our social and political interactions. Readings are drawn from a growing body of research suggesting that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities represented by the concepts of civil society and social capital can have important effects on the functioning of democracy, stability and change in political regimes, the capacity of states to carry out their objectives, and international politics.

Subjects

community | community | public life | public life | social network | social network | norms | norms | association | association | civil society | civil society | international relations | international relations | politics | politics | democracy | democracy | social capital | social capital | state | state | NGO | NGO | globalization | globalization | power | power | corruption | corruption | gender | gender | citizen | citizen | rebellion | rebellion | trust | trust | participation | participation | empowerment | empowerment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism. In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism.

Subjects

social capital | social capital | civil society | civil society | social networks | social networks | community norms | community norms | associational activities | associational activities | state | state | democracy | democracy | government | government | economic development | economic development | social welfare | social welfare | democratization | democratization | pluralism | pluralism | public goods provision | public goods provision | state capacity | state capacity | international politics | international politics | globalization | globalization | social sanctions | social sanctions | political participation | political participation | social movements | social movements | civic engagement | civic engagement | politics | politics | political science | political science | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social justice | social justice

License

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17.951 Special Graduate Topic in Political Science: Public Opinion (MIT) 17.951 Special Graduate Topic in Political Science: Public Opinion (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the vast literature devoted to public opinion. In the next 12 weeks, we will survey the major theoretical approaches and empirical research in the field of political behavior (though we will only tangentially discuss political  participation and voting). For the most part we will focus on American public opinion, though some of the work we will read is comparative in nature. This course provides an introduction to the vast literature devoted to public opinion. In the next 12 weeks, we will survey the major theoretical approaches and empirical research in the field of political behavior (though we will only tangentially discuss political  participation and voting). For the most part we will focus on American public opinion, though some of the work we will read is comparative in nature.

Subjects

political science | political science | public opinion | public opinion | voting | voting | elections | elections | empirical research | empirical research | analysis | analysis | ideology | ideology | american | american | society | society | media | media | public policy | public policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | democracy | democracy | theory | theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT) 17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville. This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | social order | social order | history | history | justice | justice | democracy | democracy | state | state | philosophy | philosophy | plato | plato | aristotle | aristotle | machiavelli | machiavelli | hobbes | hobbes | locke | locke | rousseau | rousseau | marx | marx | de tocqueville | de tocqueville | individual | individual | political science | political science | political philosophy | political philosophy | politics | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.042 Citizenship and Pluralism (MIT) 17.042 Citizenship and Pluralism (MIT)

Description

This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: Do This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: Do

Subjects

citizenship | citizenship | ethnicity | ethnicity | identity | identity | democracy | democracy | nations | nations | politics | politics | class differentiation | class differentiation | pluralism | pluralism | national unity | national unity | contemporary | contemporary | political | political | philosophy | philosophy | multiculturalism | multiculturalism | racial | racial | ethnic | ethnic | groups | groups | national | national | minorities | minorities | aboriginals | aboriginals | women | women | sexual | sexual | injustice | injustice | recognition | recognition | accommodation | accommodation | democratic | democratic | states | states | group-differentiated | group-differentiated | rights | rights | exemptions | exemptions | laws | laws | representation | representation | language | language | limited | limited | self-government | self-government | theories | theories | justice | justice | conflict | conflict | liberalequality | liberalequality | citizens | citizens | multi-religious | multi-religious | multicultural | multicultural | society | society | diversity | diversity | communitarian | communitarian | civic | civic | republican | republican | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan | pluralist | pluralist | radical | radical | postmodern | postmodern | American | American | gender | gender | class | class | differentiation | differentiation | liberal | liberal | equality | equality | unity | unity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT) 17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others. This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others.

Subjects

norms of justice | norms of justice | interstate | interstate | political justice | political justice | economic justice | economic justice | human rights | human rights | skepticism about global justice | skepticism about global justice | global democracy | global democracy | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | nature of distributive justice | nature of distributive justice | pluralism and human rights | pluralism and human rights | rights to control borders | rights to control borders | Kant | Kant | Habermas | Habermas | Rawls | Rawls | Sen | Sen | Beitz | Beitz | Nussbaum | Nussbaum | Stiglitz | Stiglitz | Ignatieff | Ignatieff | 17.000 | 17.000 | 24.611 | 24.611

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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